GreenDuck12

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Welcome to the forums.

With post-bacs there are two major categories: formal and informal. Formal programs typically require and application and are fairly structured (i.e. class schedule is set for you and you move through the program typically in 12 months). Programs like this are Scripps, Brywn Mawr and Goucher. For these three programs, your stats aren't very competitive as they typically go for "career changers" with a strong record of academic achievement. They also are very expensive (30-40k for the program plus living expenses). That brings us to the other category of informal post-bacs. Informal post-bac is taking classes a la carte through a local university. Many programs have this option and a few have class schedules tailored to this demographic (Harvard Extension School is one). For these programs, all you need to do is register for the class and make sure you meet the minimum requirements. So, when you ask if you have a chance at a post bac, the answer is yes but it is going to depend the type of program you are looking for and how much time/money you are willing to spend.

As for whether or not it is feasible is entirely up to you to decide. As I'm sure you are aware a 3.0 GPA is not competitive for allopathic or osteopathic medical programs. If you do well in your post bac and take some extra science classes you may be able to bring up you cGPA to a 3.2-3.4 range, which is in the range for osteopathic schools but low for allopathic. One benefit to osteopathic programs is that you can retake low grade courses and replace the grade with the most recent score (hopefully higher). This is a great option for applicants who need to improve their GPA as they can retake F, D, and C grade classes for a boost. Additionally, the MCAT is going to be very important for you. A competitive score on the MCAT for medical schools is in the top 25%. If you are able to raise your cGPA and sGPA and earn a competitive score, you may be able to find a way to an admission to an osteopathic schools or some allopathic schools depending on other factors (nothing is guaranteed). In the event that you are not admitted when you apply, you can pursue an SMP. Check the forums for more on these.

If you choose to pursue medicine, you are looking at several years of undergraduate classes, a year for the application cycle and 4 years of medical school plus residency. Looking at this timeline, there is a huge tendency to rush and get started right away. Be careful of doing that. Many have made this mistake and started taking classes without being prepared and/or driven enough to do well (my close friend, for example) and put themselves back several years in the process. Spend some time volunteering/shadowing/talking to physicians to see if this is something that interests you enough to spend many years of your life training and many thousands of dollars pursuing. Additionally, keep in mind that in any year 60% of medical school applicants do not matriculate to any program. You have to respect your competition because it is fierce. PM me if you have any other questions. Best of luck to you.
 
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cottard

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GreenDuck12

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It depends on what your idea of a "good investment" is. If your question is purely financial i.e. will it pay off to go to medical school, I would say there are much better ways to accumulate wealth, though, I don't think this is what you mean. I think you're asking that if you put in the time and money, the outcome, being a doctor, will materialize. There is not a single person on the forums who can predict that with any certainty for any applicant regardless of stats. There are no guarantees. If it helps, here is data provided by the aamc regarding admissions based on gpa and mcat. https://www.aamc.org/download/321508/data/factstablea23.pdf
 

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Epi Geek
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Oh, shoot, I didn't even realize there was a dedicated sub! Sorry to clutter things up. Please move the thread if you think it should be over there. Sorry!

No prob. It's fine either location as quite a few nontrads have experience with postbacs.

You just might get more responses there, so I'll move it.
 

Moko

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Haha, I mean, we could argue about language problems and definitions until the sun blows up, but yes, I meant more the latter--I have zero interest in being wealthy. I've fiddled with that chart before (it's somehow comforting and terrifying at the same time) but was hoping for others' analagous experiences, especially re: post bac acceptances and what those led to, or a hard "no, do something else with your life because this is actually a terrible idea for you."
You're going to get mostly supportive responses here on this forum. GreenDuck12 did a fantastic job at outlining what your path will realistically look like. Only you can decide whether the potential benefit (getting accepted down the road) is worth the costs and risks (spending multiple years repairing your GPA / completing pre-reqs and not having an acceptance at the end of the day... not to mention opportunity costs etc.).

There are people who have made 'comebacks' before and successfully got admitted to med school despite starting with sub-3.0 GPAs (check the non-trad and reapplicant forums). So these anecdotal experiences do exist. But as mentioned, this is a personal decision, e.g. I would not have had the courage to pursue medicine had I started out in their position.
 

GreenDuck12

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Search the forums for non-trad success stories and low gpa recovery and you should be able to find some of what you are looking for. Be careful of relying too much on the stories of others as each situation is unique. One problem with the table I linked above is that it does not include other relevant factors that impact an admission but focuses solely on GPA and MCAT. Hope this helps.


Haha, I mean, we could argue about language problems and definitions until the sun blows up, but yes, I meant more the latter--I have zero interest in being wealthy. I've fiddled with that chart before (it's somehow comforting and terrifying at the same time) but was hoping for others' analagous experiences, especially re: post bac acceptances and what those led to, or a hard "no, do something else with your life because this is actually a terrible idea for you."
 
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