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Looking to reinvent, but not sure where to start? I have taken nearly every science class in the book.

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AsILayFaulkner_8

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Hello!

I'm hoping my situation isn't super unheard of because I'm really needing some insight. I am a MD/DO hopeful looking to reinvent with a DIY postbacc. However, I have a million undergrad credits and have taken Zoology, Ecology, both sections of Human Anatomy and Physiology, Histology, Genetics, Vertebrate Physiology, Evolution, Biostatistics, Cell Biology, Micro, etc. just to name a few. I went into my most recent undergrad degrees with over 120 credits as a transfer student and basically started over.

I have a BS in Biology with a focus in Integrative Biology and a BA in Philosophy with a French Minor as of 2018. I pursued both degrees at once, which is why I think I did not do so well with my BS (focusing on writing ridiculously long philosophy papers instead of studying for that Orgo exam...) and I was working 30+ hours per week. I am unable to calculate the GPAs for both degrees separately, not that a Philosophy degree and French minor would strike any school as fascinating, but wondering if that actually makes a difference. My sGPA is sub 3.0 while my cGPA is a 3.1 including some credits from starting the DIY postbacc (I have a 4.0 so far). There was a quarter system at my school (they have since switched to semesters) and I took 2nd quarter Orgo 3 times, yes THREE TIMES and escaped with only a C-. There is really no trend for my sGPA because most of my grades were the same across quarters (it was Orgo bringing my grades down). I'm looking to take a full second semester of Orgo and achieve (much) better than that, but will that look like I took the same thing 4 times, or like I'm taking a different Orgo course?

I'm looking to apply next cycle and planning on taking 24-25 credits in addition to the few I have already taken in order to attempt to make myself a more palatable applicant. I am kind of at a loss with this though because I've taken so many science classes and I'm not really wanting to retake classes that I have a C or better in per @Goro . At this point I'm not sure I have much of an option though. I'm hoping that getting a 3.7+ during this postbacc will somehow demonstrate that I am a better student than I was three years ago.

Any advice at all would help! Thanks!
 

DocJanItor

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Agree with Goro. You likely have too many credits weighing down your GPA to make much of a dent with 1-2 semesters of courses. The only reason I would take more courses is to retake a C- or below in a prereq or to take a prereq that you haven't had yet. To get into an SMP you'd also likely need to take the MCAT first. Doing well on that will be very important.
 
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AsILayFaulkner_8

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Agree with Goro. You likely have too many credits weighing down your GPA to make much of a dent with 1-2 semesters of courses. The only reason I would take more courses is to retake a C- or below in a prereq or to take a prereq that you haven't had yet. To get into an SMP you'd also likely need to take the MCAT first. Doing well on that will be very important.
Thank you for your response! I was hoping I wouldn't have to do an SMP because finances are crazy tight. However, I did the calculations (with a GPA calculator) and you're right, the highest GPA I could achieve on this current path is a sGPA of a 3.04 and a cGPA of 3.2 with 32 more credit hours (if I can find enough classes I haven't taken already). I was hoping with a pretty decent MCAT coupled with good clinical/research experience and shadowing I could get a few interviews.

I will look into some SMPs! I heard of a few scholarships for URMs that may help out with funding this.

Thanks again!
 
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DocJanItor

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Thank you for your response! I was hoping I wouldn't have to do an SMP because finances are crazy tight. However, I did the calculations (with a GPA calculator) and you're right, the highest GPA I could achieve on this current path is a sGPA of a 3.04 and a cGPA of 3.2 with 32 more credit hours (if I can find enough classes I haven't taken already). I was hoping with a pretty decent MCAT coupled with good clinical/research experience and shadowing I could get a few interviews.

I will look into some SMPs! I heard of a few scholarships for URMs that may help out with funding this.

Thanks again!
I mean if you can get both above a 3.0 with just 32 credit hours then you might be able to avoid an SMP, but you'd have to get a 4.0 and a very good MCAT to be competitive for some DO schools, but you still might struggle. And the vast majority of students pay for school with federal student loans, so "tight" isn't really a factor in that regard. I know the Georgetown GEMS program is designed for URMs trying to get into medical school but I have no idea about their financial support system.
 
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AsILayFaulkner_8

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I mean if you can get both above a 3.0 with just 32 credit hours then you might be able to avoid an SMP, but you'd have to get a 4.0 and a very good MCAT to be competitive for some DO schools, but you still might struggle. And the vast majority of students pay for school with federal student loans, so "tight" isn't really a factor in that regard. I know the Georgetown GEMS program is designed for URMs trying to get into medical school but I have no idea about their financial support system.
If I maintain the same attitude next semester, I may be able to get a 4.0! It is just that I can pay for an entire DIY postbacc relatively comfortably out of pocket at a few schools locally in both IL and IA and not have to possibly move across the country, and was hoping to save a little where I could. I would be thrilled to get even one interview with a DO school if I had the chance!

Also, I have heard good things from people who have done that program! And I hear there are a few others similar in nature. There are also a few medical schools "close by", so I will see if maybe they offer an SMP program or anything similar.

Thanks! :)
 

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If I maintain the same attitude next semester, I may be able to get a 4.0! It is just that I can pay for an entire DIY postbacc relatively comfortably out of pocket at a few schools locally in both IL and IA and not have to possibly move across the country, and was hoping to save a little where I could. I would be thrilled to get even one interview with a DO school if I had the chance!

Also, I have heard good things from people who have done that program! And I hear there are a few others similar in nature. There are also a few medical schools "close by", so I will see if maybe they offer an SMP program or anything similar.

Thanks! :)

What is more valuable to you? Time or money? It will likely take you 2-3 years of DIY postbacc for the same results 1 year in an SMP will give you. Of course there are no guarantees either way, but doing well in an SMP (especially one with linkages) will be far superior than anything a diy can provide. And to some degree, there is a guarantee (normally for an interview), assuming you do well in an SMP.

How will you pay for medical school?
I like to think of SMP as being 5 years (as part of medical school). It's just one additional year of loans (slightly cheaper than med school, depending on the program).

In the end what the difference between 250k in debt and 300k in debt? You will likely defer it all until after residency and when you account for interest, those numbers will be much higher. So 50k wont be that big of a deal - and some programs cost as low as 25-30k.

That being said, I urge you to find an SMP with linkages - you may very well end up at that same school for 5 years if you can get into the med school due to said linkage. But regardless any well known SMP (and doing well) will open doors to most med schools around the country.

What State do you live in? perhaps I can recommend a few programs if you want to stay local, as I recently made a comprehensive list of SMPs.
 
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theendisnigh

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I would make sure to get that sGPA above 3.0. Even in an SMP some schools have screening cutoffs below 3.0
 
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MedicallyEnthused

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I would make sure to get that sGPA above 3.0. Even in an SMP some schools have screening cutoffs below 3.0

If you have an upward trend, regardless of cutoff, they can make exceptions. I have known of many people with a sub 3.0 get into SMPs that advertise a minimum 3.0 gpa. Just saying.

MCAT will likely play a big factor.
 

theendisnigh

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If you have an upward trend, regardless of cutoff, they can make exceptions. I have known of many people with a sub 3.0 get into SMPs that advertise a minimum 3.0 gpa. Just saying.

MCAT will likely play a big factor.
Right, but to maximize your chances, you want to be the rule and not the exception.
 
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AsILayFaulkner_8

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What is more valuable to you? Time or money? It will likely take you 2-3 years of DIY postbacc for the same results 1 year in an SMP will give you. Of course there are no guarantees either way, but doing well in an SMP (especially one with linkages) will be far superior than anything a diy can provide. And to some degree, there is a guarantee (normally for an interview), assuming you do well in an SMP.

How will you pay for medical school?
I like to think of SMP as being 5 years (as part of medical school). It's just one additional year of loans (slightly cheaper than med school, depending on the program).

In the end what the difference between 250k in debt and 300k in debt? You will likely defer it all until after residency and when you account for interest, those numbers will be much higher. So 50k wont be that big of a deal - and some programs cost as low as 25-30k.

That being said, I urge you to find an SMP with linkages - you may very well end up at that same school for 5 years if you can get into the med school due to said linkage. But regardless any well known SMP (and doing well) will open doors to most med schools around the country.

What State do you live in? perhaps I can recommend a few programs if you want to stay local, as I recently made a comprehensive list of SMPs.
First, thank you for your insight and taking the time to respond to my post!

Unfortunately, I think that money at this point is more important for me. I'm currently working a hospital job that has a good tuition reimbursement option and offers a lot of scholarships (locally). I have 8 out of the 32 credit hours already at a 4.0 so hopefully the remaining 6 classes will have the same result. I should be able to finish all of the classes by May of 2022. (I currently make ~19k per year and I have a pile of medical bills due to a near death experience with the covid vaccine and a few other weird occurrences. However, I am trying to leave my job with all of my might and have three interviews this week so fingers crossed that will work in my favor!)

While I am open to SMPs because they do seem like the more valuable option, I am more open to SMPs and programs that are not going to totally financially ruin me. I would prefer not to have to come up with that much money in just a couple of months. I hope to pay for medical school through grants, scholarships, and loans. I would be doing it all myself and a lot of options for me are just private loans, so having to pay those back during school is not really much of an option for me right now, but in a year or two, who knows.

I live in Illinois, work in Iowa so SMPs in either state would be amazing! Thank you for offering to share your list! Honestly, I just want to get into med school and do my thing. So if an SMP is really what it takes then I really don't have much of a choice lol
 

MedicallyEnthused

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First, thank you for your insight and taking the time to respond to my post!

Unfortunately, I think that money at this point is more important for me. I'm currently working a hospital job that has a good tuition reimbursement option and offers a lot of scholarships (locally). I have 8 out of the 32 credit hours already at a 4.0 so hopefully the remaining 6 classes will have the same result. I should be able to finish all of the classes by May of 2022. (I currently make ~19k per year and I have a pile of medical bills due to a near death experience with the covid vaccine and a few other weird occurrences. However, I am trying to leave my job with all of my might and have three interviews this week so fingers crossed that will work in my favor!)

While I am open to SMPs because they do seem like the more valuable option, I am more open to SMPs and programs that are not going to totally financially ruin me. I would prefer not to have to come up with that much money in just a couple of months. I hope to pay for medical school through grants, scholarships, and loans. I would be doing it all myself and a lot of options for me are just private loans, so having to pay those back during school is not really much of an option for me right now, but in a year or two, who knows.

I live in Illinois, work in Iowa so SMPs in either state would be amazing! Thank you for offering to share your list! Honestly, I just want to get into med school and do my thing. So if an SMP is really what it takes then I really don't have much of a choice lol

That's all understandable. We all have different priorities.

I just think if medical school will already put you in a lot debt, whats a little extra gonna do?
To be realistic most scholarships/grants from medical school (aside from a full ride) will only cover at most 5-10k, so you will be taking loans upward of 200-300k (depending on the program) for all 4 years.

That why I think another 50k or so for an SMP isn't that big of a change, when as an attending you could pay off all your loans within 3 years (assuming you defer loans to once you complete residency).
Just my opinion though, and I get avoiding an SMP for money issues, but the financial aid/federal loans will be available for these such programs since they are graduate level and will culminate in a Master's degree.

That being said, I only really know of 2 SMPs in your area - both are in Chicago.
Loyola University and Rosalind Franklin University, both of which have conditional Interview agreements and both cost about $50k for the year.


Perhaps your job will make a larger impact on scholarship/grants than you would normally not receive for these programs.
Also keep in mind it is NOT recommended to work during an SMP.

I hope this helps and good luck!
 
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LizzyM

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Here's the deal with SMP.... would you bet $50,000 that you could out perform the average first year medical student in the science portion of the MD curriculum? If you think you'd win that bet, go for it. If you do not, think very carefully about how you want to spend your time and money and whether medical school is a realistic option for you given your specific circumstances.

You could go through slowly accumulating more science classes while you work but at the end of the day, even with a post-bac GPA of 4.0, the response may be, "Well that's taking one course at a time, what will the student do with a full-time load?" You need to show that you can handle a full-time academic load and do exceptionally well.
 
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AsILayFaulkner_8

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Here's the deal with SMP.... would you bet $50,000 that you could out perform the average first year medical student in the science portion of the MD curriculum? If you think you'd win that bet, go for it. If you do not, think very carefully about how you want to spend your time and money and whether medical school is a realistic option for you given your specific circumstances.

You could go through slowly accumulating more science classes while you work but at the end of the day, even with a post-bac GPA of 4.0, the response may be, "Well that's taking one course at a time, what will the student do with a full-time load?" You need to show that you can handle a full-time academic load and do exceptionally well.
Hello LizzyM,
I'm happy you took the time to respond to my post!

I would totally bet on an SMP! This career path is something I am really passionate about and would probably give my left arm to pursue it (however, given that I think I want to be a surgeon that wouldn't be practical lol). I would be taking three classes at a time at 4 credit hours each for two semesters while working full time and volunteering. It would be 24 credit hours for this school year, and 31 credit hours total including last semester where I took 2 classes and worked full time and then some because of mandatory overtime hours due to hospital shortages (no one wanted to work on the Covid Unit; I still work on the Covid Unit and we're still short of course). I managed to get high A's in those classes despite burn out from Covid, so I was thinking if I kept up the same attitude I could do just as well this year.

Also- I was finding a few SMP programs with similar credit totals (~29-32) so I thought taking similar classes at "local" colleges would be okay and a way to save money for the time being.
 

LizzyM

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Undergrad classes at a local college is not the same as a SMP. The SMP is, essentially, the first year of medical school; Anatomy and physiology, biochemistry, genetics, etc at the graduate/professional level.

If you have the nerve to borrow 50K and bet it all on your success, go for it. In essence you are putting yourself out there as willing to pay for 5 years of medical school with the first year being an audition.
 
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AsILayFaulkner_8

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Undergrad classes at a local college is not the same as a SMP. The SMP is, essentially, the first year of medical school; Anatomy and physiology, biochemistry, genetics, etc at the graduate/professional level.

If you have the nerve to borrow 50K and bet it all on your success, go for it. In essence you are putting yourself out there as willing to pay for 5 years of medical school with the first year being an audition.
Hi again LizzyM!

Sorry if I didn't explain my point well enough; I know you can't read my mind as I type this stuff. I know that each can have vastly different impacts on an application. I was speaking about the DIY post-bac route, just saying that I would not be taking one class at a time and would be taking on a full course load with more than a few credits. Not saying they were the same at all! Just saying I would be taking the same amount of credit hours that an SMP would offer and thought it may also illustrate my maturation as a student!

Thank you again for your advice! I'm researching SMPs every hour of every day it seems.
 

LizzyM

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Adcoms don't care about your "maturation as a student". They want to know if you will be able to do well in medical school, pass the board exams, and land a residency placement. Excellent performance in the pre-reqs are a good indicator. If a student didn;'t do well in the pre-reqs but the school is willing to look at those who did not take the straight path through college to medical school (crooked arrows) then other evidence is needed to show that the student has what is takes to do well in med school and the SMP, because it is often the M1 classes, in the same room with M1 students, is the gold standard for demonstrating one's ability to succeed in medical school. I think that is is a huge gamble and don't generally recommend it as it has no market value if you don't accomplish the goal of getting into med school (not many employers hiring people with a special masters degree in anatomy).
 
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AsILayFaulkner_8

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Adcoms don't care about your "maturation as a student". They want to know if you will be able to do well in medical school, pass the board exams, and land a residency placement. Excellent performance in the pre-reqs are a good indicator. If a student didn;'t do well in the pre-reqs but the school is willing to look at those who did not take the straight path through college to medical school (crooked arrows) then other evidence is needed to show that the student has what is takes to do well in med school and the SMP, because it is often the M1 classes, in the same room with M1 students, is the gold standard for demonstrating one's ability to succeed in medical school. I think that is is a huge gamble and don't generally recommend it as it has no market value if you don't accomplish the goal of getting into med school (not many employers hiring people with a special masters degree in anatomy).
Hello again!

Okay then, I guess I was misunderstanding the purpose of the two. Is there a difference (to adcoms) of whether or not I do a DO SMP vs an MD SMP? An online SMP or in person SMP? I have seen some programs say you have to be vaccinated to attend their school. I cannot get vaccinated yet (health reasons), so I was thinking online would be a viable option.

Thanks again for your advice!
 

LizzyM

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I don't see applicants who have done SMP (they generally don't apply to T20 schools). I have never heard of an online SMP.
If you can't get vaccinated for health reasons, then you might have a hard time meeting the expectations that adcoms have of pre-meds (activities, etc) until you have your health under control..
@Goro knows about the SMP at his school and might be able to help with this question.
 

AsILayFaulkner_8

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I don't see applicants who have done SMP (they generally don't apply to T20 schools). I have never heard of an online SMP.
If you can't get vaccinated for health reasons, then you might have a hard time meeting the expectations that adcoms have of pre-meds (activities, etc) until you have your health under control..
@Goro knows about the SMP at his school and might be able to help with this question.
Oh okay. And my health itself is pretty much fine, but I had a severely life threatening reaction to the first vaccine shot so whenever I try to get my second one I'm just immediately turned away.

I will do more research on SMPs in the meantime!

Thanks again LizzyM for all of your advice :)
 
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RespectTheChemistry

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I'm sorry that happened to you, @AsILayFaulkner_8. This may be a silly question, but have you tried obtaining the necessary vaccine through your PCP and explaining the situation? I notice pharmacies are much more strict about their vaccine administration rules than regular doctor's offices are.

If you feel that isn't a good option for you either, think it's worth an email to the schools requiring COVID shots for attendance to ask if they'd be willing to take a note from your own physician saying you can't get vaccinated because of serious health concerns. That's what our PK-12 schools do for kids with cancer.

P.S. Congratulations on the 4.0 on your post-bacc so far. :)
 

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I'm sorry that happened to you, @AsILayFaulkner_8. This may be a silly question, but have you tried obtaining the necessary vaccine through your PCP and explaining the situation? I notice pharmacies are much more strict about their vaccine administration rules than regular doctor's offices are.

If you feel that isn't a good option for you either, think it's worth an email to the schools requiring COVID shots for attendance to ask if they'd be willing to take a note from your own physician saying you can't get vaccinated because of serious health concerns. That's what our PK-12 schools do for kids with cancer.

P.S. Congratulations on the 4.0 on your post-bacc so far. :)
Hello RespectTheChemistry!

I have talked to my PCP and 4 other physicians and they all have said absolutely not. I even tried to get my second vaccine in the emergency room just in case and even they said absolutely not. I'm trying to wait for other vaccines to be available here so I can give them a try. Another physician said to just get the J&J vaccine in addition to my first shot and see how that goes.

I will ask around at some of the programs I'm interested in and see if they can make exceptions!

Thanks again :)
 
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I don't see applicants who have done SMP (they generally don't apply to T20 schools). I have never heard of an online SMP.
If you can't get vaccinated for health reasons, then you might have a hard time meeting the expectations that adcoms have of pre-meds (activities, etc) until you have your health under control..
@Goro knows about the SMP at his school and might be able to help with this question.
Agree with this. It might be worth a shot if OP already has great ECs and you get an SMP to accept you without one. If you don’t have great activities, I’d pause just because SMP won’t fix activities and the vast majority of activities require you to be vaxxed.
 

AsILayFaulkner_8

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Agree with this. It might be worth a shot if OP already has great ECs and you get an SMP to accept you without one. If you don’t have great activities, I’d pause just because SMP won’t fix activities and the vast majority of activities require you to be vaxxed.
Hello LondonVibes!

I'm really trying to get some more ECs together!

A physician just agreed to let me shadow her, and I start a new position soon as a clinical trials research assistant at a university with a top tier med school. I'm hoping these help out with my application on top of thousands of hours of clinical experience in various settings, volunteering in an underserved neighborhood and some leadership roles.

I'm finding my state is a little more relaxed when it comes to being vaccinated and doing different activities.
 
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Dave1980

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Hello LondonVibes!

I'm really trying to get some more ECs together!

A physician just agreed to let me shadow her, and I start a new position soon as a clinical trials research assistant at a university with a top tier med school. I'm hoping these help out with my application on top of thousands of hours of clinical experience in various settings, volunteering in an underserved neighborhood and some leadership roles.

I'm finding my state is a little more relaxed when it comes to being vaccinated and doing different activities.

You aren't getting vaccinated? Somehow I'm not surprised.
 

DocJanItor

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You aren't getting vaccinated? Somehow I'm not surprised.
She supposedly had a life-threatening reaction to the first shot. So if true it's a rare justification for not getting vaccinated.
 

Dave1980

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She supposedly had a life-threatening reaction to the first shot. So if true it's a rare justification for not getting vaccinated.
I don't believe that but even if it were true there are multiple different vaccines. J&J is totally different from Pfizer and Moderna.

If you want to be in healthcare get the vaccine. Otherwise remain a Philosophy major and French minor and oh by the way I like splenda in my coffee not real sugar.
 
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AsILayFaulkner_8

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I don't believe that but even if it were true there are multiple different vaccines. J&J is totally different from Pfizer and Moderna.

If you want to be in healthcare get the vaccine. Otherwise remain a Philosophy major and French minor and oh by the way I like splenda in my coffee not real sugar.
Hello @Dave1980
Thank you for your response.

I'm assuming you didn't read my previous post so I will go into detail with some of the reactions that sent me to the ED and why I've been turned away by several physicians in terms of getting a different shot.

I unfortunately have the medical bills and the physician rejections to prove my situation. I tried to get my second shot, showed up to get it to my appointment and was turned away by several doctors.

After my first shot, my temperature dropped dangerously low, I was going in and out of consciousness, I had seizures (with no previous history), anaphylaxis, increased blood pressures, trimmers, slurred speech, blurred vision, etc. I asked to have a different vaccine and the facility doctors said they were unable to give me something different than what I had received previously (pfizer). So I'm waiting for mixing vaccines to be approved where I live so that I am able to obtain my second shot. Until then, I will do the best I can.

I am passionate about healthcare and it's frankly people like you that strengthen my need to do this even more. Doctors who don't believe patients when they have adverse reactions is a major reason why I want to become a physician. There is a big issue in healthcare where some doctors do not believe patients or brush off symptoms (especially in women, black people, indigenous people, and people of color, but I won't really get into that) and that can end up causing more harm than good, for instance, creating more health disparities in underserved communities.

I want to help people that look like me understand that it is okay to go the the doctor, it is okay to ask for help without the fear that you will not be taken seriously.

I didn't think I had to justify me not getting the vaccine, but here we are. I want to get my second vaccine, but cannot for the time being.

Again, thank you for your response.

Update: Primary care physician said no to J&J vaccine due to current implanted birth control and age? She says the hospital will absolutely not let her mix vaccines regardless. She will consult other physicians to get their opinion on next steps. The waiting game continues.
 
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Bonne Nuit

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Hello @Dave1980
Thank you for your response.

I'm assuming you didn't read my previous post so I will go into detail with some of the reactions that sent me to the ED and why I've been turned away by several physicians in terms of getting a different shot.

I unfortunately have the medical bills and the physician rejections to prove my situation. I tried to get my second shot, showed up to get it to my appointment and was turned away by several doctors.

After my first shot, my temperature dropped dangerously low, I was going in and out of consciousness, I had seizures (with no previous history), anaphylaxis, increased blood pressures, trimmers, slurred speech, blurred vision, etc. I asked to have a different vaccine and the facility doctors said they were unable to give me something different than what I had received previously (pfizer). So I'm waiting for mixing vaccines to be approved where I live so that I am able to obtain my second shot. Until then, I will do the best I can.

I am passionate about healthcare and it's frankly people like you that strengthen my need to do this even more. Doctors who don't believe patients when they have adverse reactions is a major reason why I want to become a physician. There is a big issue in healthcare where some doctors do not believe patients or brush off symptoms (especially in women, black people, indigenous people, and people of color, but I won't really get into that) and that can end up causing more harm than good, for instance, creating more health disparities in underserved communities.

I want to help people that look like me understand that it is okay to go the the doctor, it is okay to ask for help without the fear that you will not be taken seriously.

I didn't think I had to justify me not getting the vaccine, but here we are. I want to get my second vaccine, but cannot for the time being.

Again, thank you for your response.

Damn, sounds rough. I'm sorry that happened to you. What did the CDC say to you when they followed up with you about your reaction?
 
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AsILayFaulkner_8

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Damn, sounds rough. I'm sorry that happened to you. What did the CDC say to you when they followed up with you about your reaction?
Hello JanetSnakehole,

I don't know if reporting is just slow here, but the facility that reported this reaction hasn't gotten back to me and I haven't had a follow up with anyone but my primary.

Update: VAERS rep says CDC will only follow up with a physician or vaccine recipient if they are missing information or need to do more research. He says most likely the physician did report it, but they will not contact me or the physician regarding it. He discourages making a duplicate report? He made sure to get the state I was calling from though for their records. I don't know much about how the process works though. Also for you @stinkycheeseperson . Thanks for recommending I look into this!
 
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stinkycheeseperson

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Hello JanetSnakehole,

I don't know if reporting is just slow here, but the facility that reported this reaction hasn't gotten back to me and I haven't had a follow up with anyone but my primary.
dont rely on them to submit it unless you got the report number. you can put it into VAERS
 
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Dave1980

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I am passionate about healthcare and it's frankly people like you that strengthen my need to do this even more. Doctors who don't believe patients when they have adverse reactions is a major reason why I want to become a physician.

If you ever become a physician you will learn that the majority of "allergic reactions" are not true allergic reactions. No need to get all up in arms about "people like me" unless of course by people like me you mean people who give advice based on actual knowledge and experience.
 
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AsILayFaulkner_8

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If you ever become a physician you will learn that the majority of "allergic reactions" are not true allergic reactions. No need to get all up in arms about "people like me" unless of course by people like me you mean people who give advice based on actual knowledge and experience.
Hello Dave1980,

I mean I get that too. I didn't think I had an allergic reaction to the vaccine per se, but just a weird reaction to it and whatever medication I was currently taking (my birth control or something), which is what I explained to the physicians. Unfortunately they weren't having it (valid because I'm not a physician nor have I done the research on this).

When I said people like you, I meant people that make judgements while not having the complete story. It seemed (to me) that you made the assumption that I did not try to get my second vaccine, and, I think, that I would maybe be better suited for getting your coffee based on my philosophy degree? But I'm honestly not entirely sure what that comment was really saying.

I appreciate all perspectives, especially that of a seasoned physician. However, it came off (again, to me) as rude and it seemed like a judgement was made without having the entire story or reading the previous comments first.


But, thanks for your response nonetheless.
 
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