Chamahk

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set to finish undergrad in 2 semesters (fall '14), but money's an issue, so i can't afford to stay and re-take all my "screw ups" or do an informal post-bacc and skip a masters. I heard as a masters student, you can take undergrad classes, so my plan was to get into a masters program then while doing my masters, I'll re-take some undergrad classes. When I do gpa calculations and factor in grade replacements will it count towards that? the undergrad classes i take as masters student?
 

JDMcNugent

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Yeah as long as they are undergraduate classes that match up credit-wise and have similar/the same course title and description. It wouldn't matter if the masters program was concurrent with undergrad re-takes.
 

Lost Vagus

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set to finish undergrad in 2 semesters (fall '14), but money's an issue, so i can't afford to stay and re-take all my "screw ups" or do an informal post-bacc and skip a masters. I heard as a masters student, you can take undergrad classes, so my plan was to get into a masters program then while doing my masters, I'll re-take some undergrad classes. When I do gpa calculations and factor in grade replacements will it count towards that? the undergrad classes i take as masters student?
I'm going to go ahead and say this is probably not your best course of action IMO. If you enter into any legitimate/respected masters program you wont be able to take undergraduate classes while doing a masters. Masters programs take time and money. Unless you are doing masters program that is directly linked to a medical school, it will be a waste of time. Retake your C's at a community college and concentrate on doing well your last two semesters. Try and get your gpa up above a 3.0 and as close to a 3.5 as possible and get a good mcat score and you will be fine.

But really, do not waste your time/money/effort on a masters program unless it gauntness you a spot in medical school.
 

Drrrrrr. Celty

Osteo Dullahan
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If it's a Masters in something like Biomedical science or a hard science, then medical schools will look favorably on it and consider the gpa.
That being said research never hurts and in fact significantly enhances your applicant's competitiveness.
 

Lost Vagus

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If it's a Masters in something like Biomedical science or a hard science, then medical schools will look favorably on it and consider the gpa.
That being said research never hurts and in fact significantly enhances your applicant's competitiveness.
I agree. Most osteopathic schools have a masters in biomedical science program that is some what linked to the medical school. Look into one of these. I did a masters program and it helped me big time. That being said, it cost about 30K after all things are said and done. Depending on your mcat score, you still might be better off retaking courses at community college.
 

Drrrrrr. Celty

Osteo Dullahan
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I agree. Most osteopathic schools have a masters in biomedical science program that is some what linked to the medical school. Look into one of these. I did one and it helped me big time.
Only issue is that they're massively overpriced. I mean unless your gpa is really dismal it's probably a bad deal.

That being said, tell us a little about the KCUMB masters. How are outcomes? Do people get accepted frequently to KCUMB? What about MD schools?

Any financial aid?
 

JDMcNugent

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Only issue is that they're massively overpriced. I mean unless your gpa is really dismal it's probably a bad deal.

That being said, tell us a little about the KCUMB masters. How are outcomes? Do people get accepted frequently to KCUMB? What about MD schools?

Any financial aid?
I spoke with a counselor at KCUMB and they offer interviews to their masters of biomedical sciences students to the COM if you have > 3.2 after the first semester, score above a certain percentage on their comprehensive semester exam that is over all courses (i think you need between 85-90%) and have an mcat > 25.
 

Lost Vagus

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Only issue is that they're massively overpriced. I mean unless your gpa is really dismal it's probably a bad deal.

That being said, tell us a little about the KCUMB masters. How are outcomes? Do people get accepted frequently to KCUMB? What about MD schools?

Any financial aid?
It is definitely expensive and I used financial aid to help pay for it. I thought it was most definitely worth it in my case. I'm from Kansas City and KCUMB was by far my number one choice. The program is very intense but it is also incredibly helpful. Its a year long, we took 15 hours first semester (phys 1, cell bio, anatomy with lab, epidemiology, and biochem) and then 17 hours during the second semester (phys 2, molecular biology, genetics, anatomy 2 with lab, a research class, and immunology. We then had to write a thesis over the summer and take a comprehensive exam in order to graduate. The graduate program takes up a lot of time, so nobody was able to work a job during the school year. The biggest advantage of the program is that our classes were taught by the medical school professors. I was able to build relationships with the teachers and they wrote me great letters of recommendation because they knew my personality and my academic abilities. I also made a lot of friends, which will be helpful because they will be second years while I am a first year.

A lot of our classes used the same slides the medical students get, so when I start in the fall I will be very familiar with a lot of the information. The masters program is basically a med school try out, covering a lot of the same material ( some in more detail, some in less detail). We had about 30 people in our class and somewhere around 20 people were accepted into KCUMB or elsewhere. The people that weren't accepted are trying again this cycle, and they were most likely not originally accepted because of the gpa/mcat requirements or they wanted to go to dental or PA school.

All in all, its a fantastic program that really prepares you to do well during your first 2 years of med school (I think they said that graduates of the masters program are typically in the top 25% of the medical school). A lot of people have a hard time transitioning directly from undergrad to medical school. I barely had to study in undergrad, and I had to change my study habits to do well in the masters program. Studying every day was foreign to me, but I got used to it. The only downside is that it is very time consuming and it's expensive. That being said, it was well worth it for me. A lot of osteopathic schools have similar linkage programs. I believe LECOM has one, and it is significantly less expensive if that is something you are worried about.
 
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Lost Vagus

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I spoke with a counselor at KCUMB and they offer interviews to their masters of biomedical sciences students to the COM if you have > 3.2 after the first semester, score above a certain percentage on their comprehensive semester exam that is over all courses (i think you need between 85-90%) and have an mcat > 25.
The comprehensive exam is over the summer. It's required to pass in order to graduate with the degree. You need an 80%, but you have a month long review during the summer and it's really not too bad at all. They changed the program a little bit because not as many people in my class were accepted (they now have a new dean in the medical school that wants to have a more direct pipe line into the medical school). I had a couple friends that had 26/27 mcats and did very well in the program (someone with a 4.0 in the program) that didn't get in because their undergrad gpa was not above 3.25... it's good to hear they are changing the program to help the masters students. I wouldn't go into the program thinking you are definitely guaranteed an acceptance because that's just not the case. But, if you have the money and you are willing to work hard for a year I think it is worth it.

That being said, a lot of people just retake their F/D/C classes at community colleges and bump their gpa up big time. The masters program classes do not replace undergrad classes, so the program really isn't good for gpa repair. It's mostly a program to help people prove they can handle medical and if you want to go to kcumb, it is definitely a good option
 

JDMcNugent

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The comprehensive exam is over the summer. It's required to pass in order to graduate with the degree. You need an 80%, but you have a month long review during the summer and it's really not too bad at all. They changed the program a little bit because not as many people in my class were accepted (they now have a new dean in the medical school that wants to have a more direct pipe line into the medical school). I had a couple friends that had 26/27 mcats and did very well in the program (someone with a 4.0 in the program) that didn't get in because their undergrad gpa was not above 3.25... it's good to hear they are changing the program to help the masters students. I wouldn't go into the program thinking you are definitely guaranteed an acceptance because that's just not the case. But, if you have the money and you are willing to work hard for a year I think it is worth it.

That being said, a lot of people just retake their F/D/C classes at community colleges and bump their gpa up big time. The masters program classes do not replace undergrad classes, so the program really isn't good for gpa repair. It's mostly a program to help people prove they can handle medical and if you want to go to kcumb, it is definitely a good option
Thank you for the clarification. I actually sent my application in to KCUMB for their MS biomedical science program (1 year) just in case things don't work out this year for the application cycle. I would definitely love to go to KCUMB as it is just 3 hours away from home and the city is great.
 

Drrrrrr. Celty

Osteo Dullahan
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Thank you for the clarification. I actually sent my application in to KCUMB for their MS biomedical science program (1 year) just in case things don't work out this year for the application cycle. I would definitely love to go to KCUMB as it is just 3 hours away from home and the city is great.
Kansas City is a really pleasant place. Do you have to specifically apply for the program or do you just have to call them and say you agree to be in it?
 
OP
Chamahk

Chamahk

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Nov 2, 2009
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guys, haven't been here for a bit, so i need time to get used to the new changes. I don't know how to quote w/ these new changes (sorry).
@lost vagus:
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I'm going to go ahead and say this is probably not your best course of action IMO. If you enter into any legitimate/respected masters program you wont be able to take undergraduate classes while doing a masters. Masters programs take time and money. Unless you are doing masters program that is directly linked to a medical school, it will be a waste of time. Retake your C's at a community college and concentrate on doing well your last two semesters. Try and get your gpa up above a 3.0 and as close to a 3.5 as possible and get a good mcat score and you will be fine.

But really, do not waste your time/money/effort on a masters program unless it gauntness you a spot in medical school.

---------------------------------------
I don't have money to retake classes at a community college. staying at home for 6months means I start repayment of loans. I need to get into school. I'm on an upward trend starting this semester, so hoping to keep it going for the last 2. UMDNJ is the only masters on my list w/ a guaranteed med school seat. Everything else is just a regular masters where I'm hoping to be able to re-take undergrad classes while doing my masters. I can stretch my masters out to more than a year (if need be). there were threads about people getting into schools after completing masters, I just wanted to know if retaking undergrad classes as a masters student, they'll calculate the undergrad classes (re-taken as a grad student) into the gpa retakes. I don't mind taking out loans, and after a really bad undergrad, demonstration of capability w/ upper-level science classes is what I need, don't you think?

@serenade:

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If it's a Masters in something like Biomedical science or a hard science, then medical schools will look favorably on it and consider the gpa.
That being said research never hurts and in fact significantly enhances your applicant's competitiveness

-----------------------
that's what I'm looking into. chem, bio, biochem, molecbio, and anything along those lines. I didn't do well in undergrad, so I need to really demonstrate that I can handle rigorous science classes. it's part of the reason I want to get into a masters program; glad to know that it(masters) will make a difference!
 
OP
Chamahk

Chamahk

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Nov 2, 2009
397
3
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Pre-Medical
I agree. Most osteopathic schools have a masters in biomedical science program that is some what linked to the medical school. Look into one of these. I did a masters program and it helped me big time. That being said, it cost about 30K after all things are said and done. Depending on your mcat score, you still might be better off retaking courses at community college.
figured out how to quote :banana::

my plan was to take both the GREs, MCAT during the fall ('14) and apply for entering class of spring '15 for both masters programs, d.o. schools. considering how that will be a financial challenge, i thought to forget about the mcat and medical school for now and focus on getting into a masters program and using that 1-year period to strengthen myself before applying for d.o. medical schools the following year.

but after your advice, i should look into schools w/ linkage programs attached to their masters, right?

i don't plan to take the MCATs until halfway into the linkage/masters program so any of these schools accept GREs?
 

JDMcNugent

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Kansas City is a really pleasant place. Do you have to specifically apply for the program or do you just have to call them and say you agree to be in it?
I had to apply to the program, specifically. It was pretty straightforward. One essay on how the program will lead your to your goal(s), MCAT, transcripts, basic background info and thats about it. You just need >3.0 science gpa along with their DO science requirements & MCAT > 22 (25 for guaranteed DO school interview) to get into the masters program.
 

Drrrrrr. Celty

Osteo Dullahan
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I had to apply to the program, specifically. It was pretty straightforward. One essay on how the program will lead your to your goal(s), MCAT, transcripts, basic background info and thats about it. You just need >3.0 science gpa along with their DO science requirements & MCAT > 22 (25 for guaranteed DO school interview) to get into the masters program.
And if you applied and interviewed for the COM?
 
Nov 14, 2013
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Pre-Dental
If it's a Masters in something like Biomedical science or a hard science, then medical schools will look favorably on it and consider the gpa.
That being said research never hurts and in fact significantly enhances your applicant's competitiveness.
Yes, i do agree with you.
 

JDMcNugent

5+ Year Member
May 5, 2013
459
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And if you applied and interviewed for the COM?
I believe in order to get a guaranteed interview for COM if you are a student in their masters program, you need to have a 3.2 or greater in their program after semester 1, and your mcat needs to be greater than a 25. To get into the masters program you just need a 3.2 science gpa and greater than a 22 mcat. If you have lower than a 25 mcat and enroll in the program, you would have to somehow fit in a successful mcat attempt (>25) before the end of 1st semester in the program. The admissions counselor made it sounds like the COM loves their masters students and they have a high acceptance rate for those offered guaranteed interviews.
 

JDMcNugent

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May 5, 2013
459
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And if you applied and interviewed for the COM?
I believe in order to get a guaranteed interview for COM if you are a student in their masters program, you need to have a 3.2 or greater in their program after semester 1, and your mcat needs to be greater than a 25. To get into the masters program you just need a 3.0 science gpa and greater than a 22 mcat. If you have lower than a 25 mcat and enroll in the program, you would have to somehow fit in a successful mcat attempt (>25) before the end of 1st semester in the program. The admissions counselor made it sounds like the COM loves their masters students and they have a high acceptance rate for those offered guaranteed interviews.
 

JDMcNugent

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OP, do some research on the school's websites. I am sure that most accept the GRE but if I were in your shoes, I would say screw the GRE and just put in your best effort on the MCAT. I think it would be a waste of time to study for the GRE if you ultimately want to get into a DO school. Check out other DO schools websites to see if they have Master's programs in biomedical sciences or something linked to the medical school. Then find out what criteria needs to be met in order to be granted an interview.