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My story as an Unemployed Pharmacist with Residency, experience, solid network

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workinhard

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I have to start this post by saying to the moderators of student doctor network, please do not move this thread to the "job outlook" mega thread. The reasons I say this is when I searched unemployed pharmacist studentdoctor does not get great hits for this bc Google indexes a lot based upon title of the actual Thread. I am hoping my story can give some good insight into some things the profession is facing and the struggle I am facing.

This is a serious post so please keep responses serious. I am also reaching out for any advice any member on these forums can offer.

To start, I am a licensed pharmacist in 2 and soon to be other states. I have a doctor of pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree, completed an ASHP accredited residency and was later certified in Geriatrics with fellowship. I worked as a hospital staff pharmacist, a clinical pharmacy specialist, a clinical pharmacy manager, and brief stint in consulting pharmacy. I do have retail pharmacy experience as well.

My references are top notch from both physicians and pharmacists.

I left a job I had to relocate for a new job; however, due to the economy the company lost the contract and went under. Due to laws regarding length of employment necessary to qualify for unemployment, I did not qualify.

I have landed Per Diem work but hours are few and far between. Hours are given based on seniority. I am willing to work any shift in any pharmacy setting and willing to do it for less than other pharmacists are paid (rate here is 48-51). We all say it is about networking but the problem is there aren't jobs to network into especially with 60+ pharmacists applying for one job. I have a strong network from pharmacists I worked with, residency people, others I knew from school, and those I met at national pharmacy meetings.

To give more light on the pharmacy situation in my area, a local Director of Pharmacy left his position in a hospital on good terms. This director has PharmD, MBA, around twenty years of experience. He could only find a per diem position and eventually an overnight 7on 7 off job as a hospital staff pharmacist when the previous pharmacist was terminated for reasons beyond my knowledge. I know this former director.

You might ask why don't you go back to where you used to work? Well after I left that position and relocated, the hospital was not doing well financially because it was mostly Medicaid type payments. The hospital consolidated the clinical manager position I had with the pharmacy manager position into one to reduce a pharmacist position for budget reasons.

Here I am today, I spend majority of my days reaching out to contacts, cold calling, stopping by every pharmacy in a 100 mile radius, handing out copies of my CV, and looking for other ways to get additional training.

I do not wish this situation on anyone. I do have large loans from pharmacy school still and a family. We are barely getting by. I spoke to a few Professor friends of mine at pharmacy colleges in the Midwest that said their graduating classes are having an incredibly hard time finding anything.

I spoke to the retail chain pharmacies about working but they want those with very high volume experience and I was told that with my hospital background I would leave the position if a hospital job opened.

I see so many people post on these forums that are directors and pharmacists elsewhere. Is there any sound advice anyone can offer? I am willing to sleep in a motel and work in a far away location if need be.

Am I able to work as a pharmacy technician? I feel liked training and work experience is going to waste. The doctors I worked with can't believe how pharmacy world is different but the pharmacists I worked with all know and some pharmacists and technicians were recently laid off.

Its Z, PHarmercyst and everyone else, if you have any sort of good advice, please advice. I can exchange telephone numbers if you private message me on here. I haven't posted in a long time but I am desperate. Please understand this is very difficult for me to share this information on such a public forum.

I look forward to any positive information anyone can share.
 

NAPLEXON

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I had to relocate to a rural area in Oregon few months ago to land an offer. Now, this area, though being rural and remote, is really saturated and no openings in the chains at all. Days ago I saw a recently graduated pharmD looking for a job and he has been trying for few months with no luck. The east coast is even worse. I hope I can pay my debt as soon as possible and just get the hell out of this career. I'm thinking of joining a PA program.
 
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WVUPharm2007

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If you are seriously willing to go anywhere and do anything, look into rural Texas. I know for a fact CVS needs people down there as of a few months ago.
 
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mustang sally

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I'm a brand new grad, no residency match, still looking for a job. My heart goes out to you.

I would think with all of your training and experience, you would have good options if you are willing to relocate wherever. Otherwise I third the idea of looking at rural areas. Personally I think it's my only hope.
 

Its Z

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Your situation is not personal.
Find a hospital with no competition. The only game in town. Those typically do better.
Right place at the right time. Be available when a position opens up. Not a thing a DOP can do when there's no position. Be patient and keep searching. Market is bad... I am looking for per diem pharmacists. Actually a lot hours available but no full or part time position.
 

cycloketocaine

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Your situation is not personal.
Find a hospital with no competition. The only game in town. Those typically do better.
Right place at the right time. Be available when a position opens up. Not a thing a DOP can do when there's no position. Be patient and keep searching. Market is bad... I am looking for per diem pharmacists. Actually a lot hours available but no full or part time position.

That's how we are. I am employed by the COP but HCA was begging me to work PRN during my PGY2 cause they can't hire anyone full time. Oh, HCA, how I love you so....
 

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If you don't mind me asking what state do you live in and where do you hold licensures?
 

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workinhard

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I would work per diem any place that has it. I contacted recruiters and old them I will work for $10 an hour less than hospital pays their per diem. Per diem is very hard to come by here.

Would you have any recommendations? Should I try to contact the hospital pharmacy managers directly and tell them I would be interested and working for less than they pay their own per diem? What would your response be to this ITs Z?

I'm at the stage where I do not know where to go. Craigslist posts and I had applied to 100s of jobs. When I spoke to Human Resources the job postings were formalities because they hired within.
 

workinhard

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If you don't mind me asking what state do you live in and where do you hold licensures?

I am in New Jersey with license in PA, NJ, and license in DE and NY to come. I would license and travel but licensing is very expensive without having a guaranteed job to go to.

Can I work as a pharmacy technician? I can perform all their tasks with ease. Are there laws restricting this?

I am willing to work any shift in any setting. I am willing to sleep in a motel and do temporary for vacation and FMLA fill in. My family will have to stay while I relocate for work. That is ok with me.

If you have advice or any contacts please message me on here and we can exchange phone numbers. Thank you.
 

Sparda29

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I am in New Jersey with license in PA, NJ, and license in DE and NY to come. I would license and travel but licensing is very expensive without having a guaranteed job to go to.

Can I work as a pharmacy technician? I can perform all their tasks with ease. Are there laws restricting this?

You could, but why would you (pride wise?)?

I'm thinking of being a taxi driver over the summer while I wait to get licensed to make some bank. And a good taxi driver in NYC, makes some serious dough. Like well over $500/shift.
 

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I don't think he'd get hired as a tech either, same reasoning. He's obviously gonna leave as soon as he finds pharmacist work. Workinhard, did you graduate in like 08 then do a residency then work all those jobs? Maybe with your history of jumping around so much employers feel like you'll leave when something better comes along.... just a thought. Regardless I wish you luck... with your credentials you're going to eventually find something, hopefully sooner than later :\
 

workinhard

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Thanks for the kind words. I did residency then worked my way up in the hospital. I worked per diem staffing in retail and hospital staffing. This is how I had that experience. I was not a full time retail pharmacist.

Regarding the pride comment. In life you have to swallow your pride and do what is best for you and your family. Money makes the world go round. I'll work as a janitor it doesn't matter. You do what you have to do to make it through life. Sometimes you have to take a few steps backwards before you can step forward.
 
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poda521

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I'm a licensed pharmacist in DE. I got my license in November of last year and to this day I only have received one job interview (way back in January). Jobs are extremely, extremely rare to find here. All retail stores are on a hiring freeze as I'm told by 3 different DMs in DE. Heck, even independent pharmacies won't accept volunteers right now.

I was told by a Walgreens DM in Pennsylvania that you can't work as a tech or intern because the company would still have to pay you as a Pharmacist since you're already licensed.

And most likely once you get licensed, whatever meager job offering there is in DE, you'll most likely get the job over me since I have no experience whatsoever. /life

Right now I'm studying to get licensed in PA and in WI...and leaning towards moving to WI at this point.
 

awval999

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Unfortunately this is our future.

All I do is continue to rent and pay down my student loans. Girlfriend (teacher) can't find a certified position, just long-term subbing. This is the future, with hundreds of thousands of dollars of student loans.

Enjoy what you can.
We warned you pre-pharms.
 
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WVUPharm2007

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Well, location is your problem. Coastal California and the Boston-NYC-Philly-DC corridor are the most saturated markets in the country. You have to have special connections and people willing to do you favors in order to find work in this area.
 

Conflagration

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Unfortunately this is our future.

All I do is continue to rent and pay down my student loans. Girlfriend (teacher) can't find a certified position, just long-term subbing. This is the future, with hundreds of thousands of dollars of student loans.

Enjoy what you can.
We warned you pre-pharms.

You live in California, which is where the most pained job market is in the country. Your experience would probably land you a job anywhere in the middle of the country. Would you be willing to move?

Personally, to avoid this, I'm going to sign up for Spanish classes in college and attempt to get certification for being bilingual.
 

awval999

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You live in California, which is where the most pained job market is in the country. Your experience would probably land you a job anywhere in the middle of the country. Would you be willing to move?

Personally, to avoid this, I'm going to sign up for Spanish classes in college and attempt to get certification for being bilingual.

I don't think you meant to quote me. I live in Ohio. And I have a job. I am thankful because I see what my classmates/forummates suffer through.
 

Conflagration

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I don't think you meant to quote me. I live in Ohio. And I have a job. I am thankful because I see what my classmates/forummates suffer through.
Whoops! Sorry.

So, you'd warn people considering pharmacy to get out?

I've lurked the boards more frequently as of late, and it seems like the majority of posters here are trying to get the pre-pharmacy students to change careers. Why is that, though?

Would you have backed out of pharmacy if these things were being said to you? Just curious, I'm a senior, if I decide I don't want this as a career, it's no skin of my nose.
 

mission707

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I have to start this post by saying to the moderators of student doctor network, please do not move this thread to the "job outlook" mega thread. The reasons I say this is when I searched unemployed pharmacist studentdoctor does not get great hits for this bc Google indexes a lot based upon title of the actual Thread. I am hoping my story can give some good insight into some things the profession is facing and the struggle I am facing.

This is a serious post so please keep responses serious. I am also reaching out for any advice any member on these forums can offer.

To start, I am a licensed pharmacist in 2 and soon to be other states. I have a doctor of pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree, completed an ASHP accredited residency and was later certified in Geriatrics with fellowship. I worked as a hospital staff pharmacist, a clinical pharmacy specialist, a clinical pharmacy manager, and brief stint in consulting pharmacy. I do have retail pharmacy experience as well.

My references are top notch from both physicians and pharmacists.

I left a job I had to relocate for a new job; however, due to the economy the company lost the contract and went under. Due to laws regarding length of employment necessary to qualify for unemployment, I did not qualify.

I have landed Per Diem work but hours are few and far between. Hours are given based on seniority. I am willing to work any shift in any pharmacy setting and willing to do it for less than other pharmacists are paid (rate here is 48-51). We all say it is about networking but the problem is there aren't jobs to network into especially with 60+ pharmacists applying for one job. I have a strong network from pharmacists I worked with, residency people, others I knew from school, and those I met at national pharmacy meetings.

To give more light on the pharmacy situation in my area, a local Director of Pharmacy left his position in a hospital on good terms. This director has PharmD, MBA, around twenty years of experience. He could only find a per diem position and eventually an overnight 7on 7 off job as a hospital staff pharmacist when the previous pharmacist was terminated for reasons beyond my knowledge. I know this former director.

You might ask why don't you go back to where you used to work? Well after I left that position and relocated, the hospital was not doing well financially because it was mostly Medicaid type payments. The hospital consolidated the clinical manager position I had with the pharmacy manager position into one to reduce a pharmacist position for budget reasons.

Here I am today, I spend majority of my days reaching out to contacts, cold calling, stopping by every pharmacy in a 100 mile radius, handing out copies of my CV, and looking for other ways to get additional training.

I do not wish this situation on anyone. I do have large loans from pharmacy school still and a family. We are barely getting by. I spoke to a few Professor friends of mine at pharmacy colleges in the Midwest that said their graduating classes are having an incredibly hard time finding anything.

I spoke to the retail chain pharmacies about working but they want those with very high volume experience and I was told that with my hospital background I would leave the position if a hospital job opened.

I see so many people post on these forums that are directors and pharmacists elsewhere. Is there any sound advice anyone can offer? I am willing to sleep in a motel and work in a far away location if need be.

Am I able to work as a pharmacy technician? I feel liked training and work experience is going to waste. The doctors I worked with can't believe how pharmacy world is different but the pharmacists I worked with all know and some pharmacists and technicians were recently laid off.

Its Z, PHarmercyst and everyone else, if you have any sort of good advice, please advice. I can exchange telephone numbers if you private message me on here. I haven't posted in a long time but I am desperate. Please understand this is very difficult for me to share this information on such a public forum.

I look forward to any positive information anyone can share.

My heart goes out to you! And I pray you find something. I just got accepted to pharmacy school. It felt like the best day of my life, and now after reading your post I am scared :/
 

awval999

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Whoops! Sorry.

So, you'd warn people considering pharmacy to get out?

I've lurked the boards more frequently as of late, and it seems like the majority of posters here are trying to get the pre-pharmacy students to change careers. Why is that, though?

Would you have backed out of pharmacy if these things were being said to you? Just curious, I'm a senior, if I decide I don't want this as a career, it's no skin of my nose.

I graduated high school in 2004.

Here's pretty much the factual statements about our profession:
1. Very few people find retail pharmacy rewarding (high pressure, low help, customers, etc)
2. More people find hospital pharmacy rewarding but even staffing positions are requiring years of experience or a PGY-1 residency
3. Clinical speciality jobs, which are very rare (<1% of our profession) nearly always require PGY-2 or >10 years experience.
4. 80% of the jobs are in retail pharmacy
5. The number of pharmacy schools has increased from ~80 in 2000 to ~130 in 2012. We are looking at ~50% more graduates than one decade ago.
6. Costs of pharmacy school are outrageous and almost always > $100K and nearing $200K for many students.
7. The pharmacist is the most expensive payroll expense for the retail pharmacies, who by law, hold fiduciary duty to their shareholders (ie: by law need to pay as little as possible)
8. Healthcare consumes http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505123_...ts-173-percent-of-gdp-in-largest-annual-jump/ 17% of our GDP. This is by all measures is unsubstainable. We pay twice as much as every other 1st-world country. This will eventually change.

So what am I doing? Paying off loans. Renting. Traveling the world when I can because when this musical chairs is over I want to at least know it was fun while it lasted.
 
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Conflagration

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I graduated high school in 2004.

Here's pretty much the factual statements about our profession:
1. Very few people find retail pharmacy rewarding (high pressure, low help, customers, etc)
2. More people find hospital pharmacy rewarding but even staffing positions are requiring years of experience or a PGY-1 residency
3. Clinical speciality jobs, which are very rare (<1% of our profession) nearly always require PGY-2 or >10 years experience.
4. 80% of the jobs are in retail pharmacy
5. The number of pharmacy schools has increased from ~80 in 2000 to ~130 in 2012. We are looking at ~50% more graduates than one decade ago.
6. Costs of pharmacy school are outrageous and almost always > $100K and nearing $200K for many students.
7. The pharmacist is the most expensive payroll expense for the retail pharmacies, who by law, hold fiduciary duty to their shareholders (ie: by law need to pay as little as possible)
8. Healthcare consumes http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505123_...ts-173-percent-of-gdp-in-largest-annual-jump/ 17% of our GDP. This is by all measures is unsubstainable. We pay twice as much as every other 1st-world country. This will eventually change.

So what am I doing? Paying off loans. Renting. Traveling the world when I can because when this musical chairs is over I want to at least know it was fun while it lasted.

In fairness, though, all the jobs are going downhill. Pharmacy is the few and the proud professions that can boast a 100k+ salary and decent working hours.

Healthcare costs are skyrocketing, but with attention comes reform. This reform that comes about will (hopefully) streamline the system by getting rid of extraneous insurance BS and also provide tort reform, which would in exchange help lower costs without lowering quality(which, we still are ahead of just about every country when it comes to healthcare).

I didn't consider pharmacy because of the pay, though. I wanted reasonable hours and still being able to help people without getting exposed to the coding situations.

To remove ambiguity, I'm a high school senior. I start freshman year of college in late August. =)
 

joetrisman

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In fairness, though, all the jobs are going downhill. Pharmacy is the few and the proud professions that can boast a 100k+ salary and decent working hours.

Healthcare costs are skyrocketing, but with attention comes reform. This reform that comes about will (hopefully) streamline the system by getting rid of extraneous insurance BS and also provide tort reform, which would in exchange help lower costs without lowering quality(which, we still are ahead of just about every country when it comes to healthcare).

I didn't consider pharmacy because of the pay, though. I wanted reasonable hours and still being able to help people without getting exposed to the coding situations.

To remove ambiguity, I'm a high school senior. I start freshman year of college in late August. =)
Not really. In comparing the US healthcare to 13 other similarly developed countries, the US ranks 12th in an average of 16 national public health indicators[1].

1. Starfield, B. (2000). Is U.S. Health Care Really the Best in the World. Journal of the American Medical Association, 284 (4), 483-485.
 

rxlea

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Not really. In comparing the US healthcare to 13 other similarly developed countries, the US ranks 12th in an average of 16 national public health indicators[1].

1. Starfield, B. (2000). Is U.S. Health Care Really the Best in the World. Journal of the American Medical Association, 284 (4), 483-485.

2000? Is there an update?
 

Conflagration

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Not really. In comparing the US healthcare to 13 other similarly developed countries, the US ranks 12th in an average of 16 national public health indicators[1].

1. Starfield, B. (2000). Is U.S. Health Care Really the Best in the World. Journal of the American Medical Association, 284 (4), 483-485.

Sorry I took a bit to respond, I was reading the article and the abstract. Very interesting!

However, we somehow placed behind Canada, which is notorious for waiting for procedures.

Seeing this, I can agree that we did(and probably do, but the study's from 2000) have room to improve, but these sorts of issues would be able to be mended for the most part with reform(especially tort, to reduce the CYA medicine that is at times at practice, which would reduce costs for unnecessary tests).
 

joetrisman

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OP, in all seriousness, why not apply to teach at a COP? You sound like your CV would be right up their alley.
 

Pharmpills

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Wow sounds pretty sad, as a recent grad I can tell you that there are still positions available but maybe not in the location you want. Alot of the ideal locations are no longer there unless you have connections or are lucky and jobs are now in the rural areas for pharmacists.
I think the first thing you need to do is to think broader and think outside your state. Also, there isn't any reason to hand out so many CV's usually sending a CV to a recruiter for a chain is enough for that chain then they will guide you. Same thing goes for an entire hospital just one CV. I have gotten 3 job offers this year (not all were ideal locations) but i did get one in the location i wanted which was certainly ideal :laugh:. Finding a job now is about patience and willing to relocate. I think the class of 2013 will fill up the remaining jobs and the class of 2014 onwards will have an enormously hard time finding jobs but thats just me.
 

Its Z

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That's how we are. I am employed by the COP but HCA was begging me to work PRN during my PGY2 cause they can't hire anyone full time. Oh, HCA, how I love you so....

HCA sucks.

I will never work for them again.
 
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I didn't consider pharmacy because of the pay, though. I wanted reasonable hours and still being able to help people without getting exposed to the coding situations.

Pharmacy is still a great healthcare field -- as far as "helping people" are concerned. It's always nice to interact with a patient that you genuinely felt you've made a difference in their lives. But still, that will often times be overlooked by the stress of the environment and internal politics. And IMHO, hours are changing now. I'm sure with reduced staffing, hours will be decreased. What also I'm seeing is that the opposite, where the only shifts that are left for jobs will be 12-14+ hour shifts with no breaks.
 

ACE Rx

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If you are seriously willing to go anywhere and do anything, look into rural Texas. I know for a fact CVS needs people down there as of a few months ago.

Yup. I have many friends who actually live in rural Texas. They have NO problems getting internships and job offers over there!

Regarding the pride comment. In life you have to swallow your pride and do what is best for you and your family. You do what you have to do to make it through life. Sometimes you have to take a few steps backwards before you can step forward.

True but even a cog, in the grand scheme of things, has its pride.
 

PharmDstudent

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I spoke to the retail chain pharmacies about working but they want those with very high volume experience and I was told that with my hospital background I would leave the position if a hospital job opened.

I see so many people post on these forums that are directors and pharmacists elsewhere. Is there any sound advice anyone can offer? I am willing to sleep in a motel and work in a far away location if need be.

As far as retail goes, people with very high volume experience will always be in demand, because they can hang at the crazy stores where no one else wants to work. :smuggrin:

If you're open to anything, I would try to get a PRN retail job and eventually move up to pharmacy manager since you have management experience already. People are quiting Walgreens left and right around here because of the Express Scripts fallout.
 

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I find your story difficult to swallow. Perhaps you really need to try harder. Pursue actively instead of going in and handing your CV and leave.
 

workinhard

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I find your story difficult to swallow. Perhaps you really need to try harder. Pursue actively instead of going in and handing your CV and leave.

If you find my story difficult to swallow, imagine how I feel right now.

I keep relationships with all the independents. A few just closed here with new walmart and Walgreens. I don't just walk in and handout a CV though. Active pursuit is what I do. Passive would be posting a resume on monster as waiting for someone to call you.

I would not post my story on here unless I was at a point to look for serious recommendations or good advice.

In reference to the teaching comments above. I have applied to schools not just pharmacy to teach. Waiting to hear. This is when they usually hire. Hopefully something pans out.
 

workinhard

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As far as retail goes, people with very high volume experience will always be in demand, because they can hang at the crazy stores where no one else wants to work. :smuggrin:

If you're open to anything, I would try to get a PRN retail job and eventually move up to pharmacy manager since you have management experience already. People are quiting Walgreens left and right around here because of the Express Scripts fallout.

Are big chains hiring per diem? I was hired by grocery pharmacy chain staffing company to do fillin shifts and trained with them for free. However, no hours have materialized from that. I am still technically on the list but I know the current pharmacists do not get overtime as are employed by the owners collective staffing company where they get priority of extra shift at straight pay.

Does Wags and Cvs offer per diem? I got some manager names given to me and called corporate.

The problem in this area is ACME grocery chain closed a bunch of stores along with path mark too. Those pharmacists were displaced as well. I spoke to some pharmacies in really bad crime areas. I figure many people won't go there for fear of safety and where robberies have been before.
 

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Are big chains hiring per diem? I was hired by grocery pharmacy chain staffing company to do fillin shifts and trained with them for free. However, no hours have materialized from that. I am still technically on the list but I know the current pharmacists do not get overtime as are employed by the owners collective staffing company where they get priority of extra shift at straight pay.

Does Wags and Cvs offer per diem? I got some manager names given to me and called corporate.

The problem in this area is ACME grocery chain closed a bunch of stores along with path mark too. Those pharmacists were displaced as well. I spoke to some pharmacies in really bad crime areas. I figure many people won't go there for fear of safety and where robberies have been before.
Yes. Chains have pharmacists who work PRN (per diem is construction industry talk and different from PRN).

This is my suggestion to you. Whatever chains have the most stores in your area, contact those district pharmacy supervisors, and tell them that you want to work PRN, because the greater the number of stores within a chain, the more PRN pharmacists it will need. No matter how well an area is staffed, last minute shifts that need to be covered are unavoidable... which is where you come in. People get sick, emergencies come up, schedules get mixed up, etc.

If they hire you, wake up by 7am M-F and 8am Sat and Sun and wait for them to call you last minute... and do not tell them "no" until you are their go-to guy.
 

PharmDstudent

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And why are you playing around with a CV? :mad:

You need a resume, and it all better fit on a single page.
 

iFarm

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I find your story difficult to swallow. Perhaps you really need to try harder.

OP doesn't need to "try harder" though. Just be more flexible. OP, you don't seem serious about being willing to move. Otherwise, you would have likely found something in a rural area... or even a small town. And your family wouldn't necessarily have to stay behind if you had a full-time $100k+ job.

Anecdotal: I've had two people contact me within the past month with job openings. And at least two hospitals within 5 miles of here are looking for pharmacists (they are not the ones who contacted me). The nearest "big city" is ~2 hours away. But I don't mind, I enjoy my work.
 

IndustryPharmD

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I am in New Jersey with license in PA, NJ, and license in DE and NY to come. I would license and travel but licensing is very expensive without having a guaranteed job to go to.
I recently received a couple e-mails about home infusion services in NJ looking for pharmacists... though that was a couple months ago, so they are probably filled already.

Does Wags and Cvs offer per diem? I got some manager names given to me and called corporate.

In NJ - only if you already have experience with the chain. Too many people who want these positions for them to take someone who needs to be trained first. I know a ton of pharmacists (myself included) who work either PRN or on a regular schedule but very few days (once a week/once every two weeks/once a month but we all have been with our respective chains or hospitals for years...

I have more seniority with the chain where I work twice a month than half the pharmacists in that entire district. :rolleyes: One of the reasons I kept my retail part-time job through all these years is that I would have something to fall back on should I lose my full-time job (which happened a couple years ago in one of the big pharma layoffs).

As far as jobs... I know that every pharma industry job requires experience, but NovoNordisk is expanding like crazy right now in the Princeton area, check out whether they have any openings in the drug safety or med info - you will fit well into those positions with your experience, if you want to make a transition to pharma and articulate that well.

Often, medical writing firms are looking for people too, and market research firms - check them out, there might be vacancies that would be a fit for you, and there are a lot of them all over New Jersey.

Good luck!
 

WVUPharm2007

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It's definitely a misnomer on SDN, as far as I'm concerned.

Let's go to wiki on this, shall we? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Per_diem
Or dictionary.com? http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/per+diem

Per diem is latin...it literally means "by day."

So how the hell is a job where you are paid by the days you get hours not able to be called "per diem?"

Since when have they started speaking latin in construction?

Tons of people call the person that picks up the occasional shift as needed the "per diem" worker. In fact, my wife's official title at CVS is "Pharmacist - Per Diem." (She's gonna get like 20 hours a week or so.)

Lordy...this forum...:laugh:
 

All4MyDaughter

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Per diem is latin...it literally means "by day."

So how the hell is a job where you are paid by the days you get hours not able to be called "per diem?"

Since when have they started speaking latin in construction?

Tons of people call the person that picks up the occasional shift as needed the "per diem" worker. In fact, my wife's official title at CVS is "Pharmacist - Per Diem." (She's gonna get like 20 hours a week or so.)

Lordy...this forum...:laugh:

Yep. I have a per diem job... and I promise it's not in construction. :laugh:
 

rxlea

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So would truck drivers be per diem?
 

rxlea

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OP, I'm sorry you're going through this. If you want to move to the desert, there are some openings here but you gotta act quick before 2012 gets licensed :(
 

JonPrePharmD

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Well, location is your problem. Coastal California and the Boston-NYC-Philly-DC corridor are the most saturated markets in the country. You have to have special connections and people willing to do you favors in order to find work in this area.
Bingo! If you're not willing to look for jobs in other parts of the country, then be prepared for the job search to be excruciating. Move south, stay out of the west. It doesn't have to be "rural texas" either, try the southeast states. AL/MS/GA/FL/SC/TN/NC. Obviously stay away from large metros, but it doesn't have to be rural either. When people say they can't find jobs in Atlanta, I want to slam my head against the wall repeatedly.
 
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