Smilemaker100

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Well, I must say... Two years out of dental school and there is not one day that goes by when I don't get bored and have a lack of funny annectodal stories to share. :laugh:

An emergency walk-in at the clinic this evening was particularly interesting. The patient in question was a tanned Caucasian female in her early 40s. A few things stood out when I first met her... namely, her teeth which were obviously chair side bleached and stood out like a sore thumb because of her very tanned skin.

When I checked out the patient's medical & dental history, she had written "implant surgery" so I naturally asked her which tooth was an implant. To my surprise, she said she didn't have dental implants but BREAST implants! So breast implants, fake blonde, teeth which were bleached to the point of glowing in the dark...I knew this would be a memorable patient. :laugh:

The patient's boyfriend had accidentally pushed her off her lawn chair a few days ago while she was enjoying some of her summer reading. A central incisor had been chipped and was slightly sensitive to percussion . I explained to the patient that the PDL ligaments had been stretched and would cause a bit of sensitivity for a while. There were a few craze lines on the crown but I concluded that there no fractures after completing the radiological exam and periodontal probing around the concerned tooth.

For the first time, in my dental career, I faced this little dilemna with composite shade selections. I wanted to do some bonding on the incisor but the palest shade I had ever worked with to date was an A1 (Vita). Well, today I discovered that there is a tint which is even PALER than A1- Bleach Shade Tint. The tint harmonized marvelously with the natural tooth and pleased the patient.

And finally, toward the end of the appointment, the patient inquired about placing a diamond on her superior lateral incisor. I asked her where she had heard about such procedures. She mentioned how one of her friends had had the procedure done and that the secretary showed her some new brochure we had recently received from "Brio Jewelry". She displayed a serious interest in having this service, so tomorrow we are going to contact the company in order to obtain further information.

http://www.jewellerybrio.com/brio_en.html

When I told the clinic owner about the patient in question, I jokingly asked him if he had had any rap stars walk into the clinic requesting "dental grills" to which he replied, "Not yet but I will definitely work on it ! That will have to be one of my next projects." He was kidding of course... :p :laugh:

Apparently, this dental jewellery fad is all the rage in Europe. I wonder how it started. :confused:
 

D(M)ental

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There was a fad a few years ago,where people had sparkly small ,diamond like jewels placed on their teeth.It was really, really tiny and was bonded to to tooth with composite.
It was invaribly eaten (without being aware at the time of course) with kababs/burgers/chicken..you get the idea :D
 

puncho

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I've heard of this...forget where. And every so often they'd change it to a different colour. From afar, it's supposed to look like a stain on your teeth but up close apparently it looks nice? Don't ask me how...
 
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puncho said:
I've heard of this...forget where. And every so often they'd change it to a different colour. From afar, it's supposed to look like a stain on your teeth but up close apparently it looks nice? Don't ask me how...
The secretary and I were having a good chuckle over coffee this morning in regards to this fad as well as the breast implant aspect of the story of this patient. Secretary had some wild suggestions in regards to that... :laugh:

Yes, I definitely will have to ask the patient exactly why this fad appeals to her the next time I see her other than what she told me,“ Oh, my friend has one and it looks so neat! ” :rolleyes:
 
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D(M)ental said:
There was a fad a few years ago,where people had sparkly small ,diamond like jewels placed on their teeth.It was really, really tiny and was bonded to to tooth with composite.
It was invaribly eaten (without being aware at the time of course) with kababs/burgers/chicken..you get the idea :D
The mini diamond alone costs $50 (Cdn) !
 
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Smilemaker100

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D(M)ental said:
There was a fad a few years ago,where people had sparkly small ,diamond like jewels placed on their teeth.It was really, really tiny and was bonded to to tooth with composite.
It was invaribly eaten (without being aware at the time of course) with kababs/burgers/chicken..you get the idea :D
The diamond alone costs $50 (Cdn) !
 
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Smilemaker100

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Etch the enamel for about 30-40 seconds.

Bonding. Do not use a self-etching bond because the acid can react with the metal and create less bonding.

Use a transparent fluid composite to bond the jewel to the tooth. And voilà! now you're in style and you'll be the envy of all your friends ! ;) :laugh:

Entire procedure (including cost of ornament) : $50-80 (Cdn)
 

SuzieQnMe

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Very informative. Thanks for sharing.

Smilemaker100 said:
Etch the enamel for about 30-40 seconds.

Bonding. Do not use a self-etching bond because the acid can react with the metal and create less bonding.

Use a transparent fluid composite to bond the jewel to the tooth. And voilà! now you're in style and you'll be the envy of all your friends ! ;) :laugh:

Entire procedure (including cost of ornament) : $50-80 (Cdn)
 
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SuzieQnMe said:
Very informative. Thanks for sharing.
Welcome,Suzie Q

I wonder how many requests I will get. Mrs Over Tanned/Fake Blonde/Breast Implant/Fluorescent Teeth ,called in today to do the procedure next week.
 

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Smilemaker100 said:
The mini diamond alone costs $50 (Cdn) !
Sounds to me like you should bill it as $50 CDN, your diamond cost, throw in another $50 CDN for bonding materials, room supplies and paying your assistant, and then add another $200 CDN so you'll be able to handle looking at "your work" afterwards :rolleyes: :D ;)

As close to that as I've come so far is I've had a patient ask me for gold crowns on their upper canines. When I asked him why he wanted them, his answer was "it's the 'in' thing right now" :rolleyes: When he asked what it would cost, I told him $1500 a tooth (more than twice my cast gold crown fee at that time), just so i wouldn't have to have someone walking around saying "Dr Jeff did these!"

It was much easier dealing with the patient I had today who is geting ready to attend her 25th high school reunion (a major cosmetic dentistry demographic population here)in about 6 weeks who wanted veneers on #7 through 11 to match her existing PFM's on 6 and 12. 30 minutes of prepping and impressing, followed by 15 minutes of temping. Fill out the lab slip for some pressed ceramic veneers in Vita 3-D shade 1M1, and a nice profitable afternoon and a fun case to do. The real interesting thing I found was that my patient owns a beauty salon and we got talking about the similarities between how we as dentists temp teeth with acrylic and how artificial acrylic nails are made. Plus then we both did a little bashing of folks with over collagened lips (we disagreed about the size of Angelina Jolie's lips) :rolleyes:
 
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DrJeff said:
Sounds to me like you should bill it as $50 CDN, your diamond cost, throw in another $50 CDN for bonding materials, room supplies and paying your assistant, and then add another $200 CDN so you'll be able to handle looking at "your work" afterwards :rolleyes: :D ;)

As close to that as I've come so far is I've had a patient ask me for gold crowns on their upper canines. When I asked him why he wanted them, his answer was "it's the 'in' thing right now" :rolleyes: When he asked what it would cost, I told him $1500 a tooth (more than twice my cast gold crown fee at that time), just so i wouldn't have to have someone walking around saying "Dr Jeff did these!"

It was much easier dealing with the patient I had today who is geting ready to attend her 25th high school reunion (a major cosmetic dentistry demographic population here)in about 6 weeks who wanted veneers on #7 through 11 to match her existing PFM's on 6 and 12. 30 minutes of prepping and impressing, followed by 15 minutes of temping. Fill out the lab slip for some pressed ceramic veneers in Vita 3-D shade 1M1, and a nice profitable afternoon and a fun case to do. The real interesting thing I found was that my patient owns a beauty salon and we got talking about the similarities between how we as dentists temp teeth with acrylic and how artificial acrylic nails are made. Plus then we both did a little bashing of folks with over collagened lips (we disagreed about the size of Angelina Jolie's lips) :rolleyes:
Thanks for sharing that one , Dr J. :laugh:

Your high school reunion patient reminds me of an emergency walk-in I had in the office this morning. The patient in question was a woman in her 70s who is going to attend her 50th reunion (undergrad in psychology).

The story briefly goes as follows : many years ago (she couldn't remember), she had an all porcelain crown placed on tooth # 8 and for some odd reason, she had what appeared to be this very old acrylic temporary crown on tooth #9 (porcelain crown never delivered? She couldn't remember... :rolleyes: ) . When I looked at the marginal gingiva around #9, it was oedematous and erythematous. I informed her that the margin of her acrylic crown was inadequate and combined with plaque deposits, contributed to localized gingivitis. She then looked at me peculiarly and asked, "Doesn't taking Vitamin C every day help prevent that?" I then proceeded to give a detailed explanation of gingivitis.

She told me that for the last months, she has been embarassed to eat in front of other people because her crowns tend to fall out. She then proceeded to manually remove the mesial portion of crown #8 and the intact
acrylic crown. I asked her when her reunion was and she said TOMORROW :eek: and she needed an immediate solution because she wanted to eat supper with her old pals ! So I ajusted the margin of the acrylic crown, I cemented the acrylic crown and the mesial portion of the porcelain crown. I informed her that the ideal treatment would be to have new porcelain crowns for both teeth.

What boggles my mind is that the patient was aware of this problem for a few months and as she told me, she has been in contact with several old college pals for many years, so I am sure she didn't hear about the reunion at the last minute! Why did she wait the day before the reunion? :rolleyes:
 

aphistis

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virginiabeach said:
rob the jewelry store and tell them to make me a grill
I'm going to give you the benefit of the doubt on this one and just assume you've started drinking early today. ;)
 

jk5177

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And this is from their website: (I think it is funny that it says "finest trend in fashion")

Brio is a dental jewellery that is fixed onto the enamel surface of the tooth. Brio is a dental ornament now part of the finest trend in fashion, it is safe and painless. Brios do not damage the teeth. They may be applied within less than five minutes without the usage of local anaesthetics. Brio may be permanent or temporary. A dental professional will remove the jewellery, damage-free in seconds if you desire.

Originally from Europe, this new trend is becoming more and more popular here in North America. Brios are conceived with the finest core products such as; 18 k gold, diamonds, precious stones and Austrian Swarovski crystals.

All occasions are pleasant to dress up your smile:
a wedding
a graduation
a special evening
a trip
any important events