Drogo

hakuna matata
Jul 13, 2011
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Pre-Medical
It can't possibly be as bad as having an online degree from University of Phoenix. :D
 
K

kpcrew

Oh man people, you guys definitely have it out for Liberty.

I actually ATTEND there right now and this is my senior year. I am an International Relations Major, but I have taken all of the med school pre-reqs and was a biology major when I started school. (I switched to IR due to an interest in the field and its application to my future) I also have a lot of friends in the Biology department...

Anyways, you guys for the most part are totally wrong about Liberty. Most of the proffessors believe in creation (or at least not in evolution), but we are not at all indoctrinated as you all seem to believe. I was a little worried about that too, but was very surprised about how little creation is ever mentioned in class. We cover everything the exact same way as a secular school, including chapters dealing directly with evolution. If we did not, we would not be able to maintain our accreditation...

You could argue that we look at the topic from a christian worldview, but everyone has presuppositions. But a teacher has NEVER discussed evolution and then said "this is wrong" or "let me tell you about creation". We actually have never discussed creation in a Biology class, and evolution is discussed just the same as everything else.

The creation museum is pretty embarrassing I will admit. Not so much the content, but the overall presentation is poor.

As for reputation and getting into medical school, I have noticed no discrimination or chronically low acceptance rates for pre-med majors graduation from Liberty. I know people who have done very well on the MCAT (35+) and have been accepted to a number of schools. I have a friend that was accepted to Johns Hopkins and was also offered a full ride to Columbia. (I promise you I am not BS-ing this) As for myself, I am still completing secondaries so I will have to see. I do not feel like Liberty has hindered me at all, and my education has been very rigorous. I had a literal 4.2 gpa in a public NON CHRISTIAN high school and found it tough to get all A's here. (i actually got 4 B's)

Our chemistry department is a little weak, (the profs are very smart, but bad teachers) but the Bio department is very good here. Many of you claim that Liberty is sub par or is full of ignorant red-neck creationists, but frankly it is you guys who are being very ignorant yourselves and are stereotyping a lot of people in a program you have never seen first hand.
cool story bro


dude you're replying to an op from over a year ago which is probably an ad for a school that many people have probably never even heard of. also your only posts are here and in an mcat thread. looks suspicious mr. champion for christ.
 

phltz

7+ Year Member
May 13, 2010
889
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Medical Student
Anyways, you guys for the most part are totally wrong about Liberty. Most of the proffessors believe in creation (or at least not in evolution), but we are not at all indoctrinated as you all seem to believe. I was a little worried about that too, but was very surprised about how little creation is ever mentioned in class. We cover everything the exact same way as a secular school, including chapters dealing directly with evolution. If we did not, we would not be able to maintain our accreditation...

You could argue that we look at the topic from a christian worldview, but everyone has presuppositions. But a teacher has NEVER discussed evolution and then said "this is wrong" or "let me tell you about creation". We actually have never discussed creation in a Biology class, and evolution is discussed just the same as everything else.
If the teachers have never said that evolution is wrong, or discussed creation, how do you know their beliefs on it?

It's hard for me to understand how this is not as big of a deal as we think. To my mind, a biology professor who doesn't believe in evolution is just as big of a deal as a physics teacher who believes in the geocentric model, a math professor who believes pi is 4, a chemistry teacher who thinks there are five elements, or a geology professor who believes the great lakes are Paul Bunyan's footsteps. People are entitles to have wacky and incorrect beliefs, but a university science professor should at least have a sound understanding of how scientific knowledge is gained.
 

Tin Man

Man o' Tin Extraordinaire
10+ Year Member
Feb 11, 2008
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No, they do not just find the creation museum strange. They are making assumption about the educational quality of the whole institution and believe for some reason that no one from Liberty gets into medical school.
It's not an unfair assumption to connect an institution's unwillingness to endorse a evolution and the quality of their program.

"We don't believe in a fundamental scientific fact that has revolutionized our understanding of all of science, since the Bible tells us it's wrong. But that doesn't mean that we don't know what we're doing!"

Right.

There's a difference between an individual professor who manages to be a creationist biologist and an institution that espouses that sort of faith. If an institution permits itself to forgo the scientific process, then we have absolutely no reason to assume that the rest of college is any more credible. An academic institution can't simply ignore an academic fact and expect people not to question where else they might creatively ignore facts inconvenient to their faith.
 
K

kpcrew

It's not an unfair assumption to connect an institution's unwillingness to endorse a evolution and the quality of their program.

"We don't believe in a fundamental scientific fact that has revolutionized our understanding of all of science, since the Bible tells us it's wrong. But that doesn't mean that we don't know what we're doing!"

Right.

There's a difference between an individual professor who manages to be a creationist biologist and an institution that espouses that sort of faith. If an institution permits itself to forgo the scientific process, then we have absolutely no reason to assume that the rest of college is any more credible. An academic institution can't simply ignore an academic fact and expect people not to question where else they might creatively ignore facts inconvenient to their faith.
Well there are young-earth geologists who believe that the earth is only about 10,000 years old but have to acknowledge scientific facts in their academic papers. For example, Marcus R. Ross, who wrote about mosasaurs in his dissertation, acknowledging that they existed more than 65 million years ago. It's like double-think from 1984 except in real life. So yeah, people somehow do ignore academic facts even in their own field of study when they go to church and believe in the Bible.
 
Jan 17, 2010
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You could argue that we look at the topic from a christian worldview,
You could also argue that you don't do as you describe. Most Christians and Christian denominations don't agree with or support the literal/non-allegorical position of evangelicals that underpins the whole creationism nonsense.

The majority Christian world view supports evolution. It's mostly just the evangelicals, a minority, who don't.

Carry on
 

aSagacious

Moderator Emeritus
7+ Year Member
Nov 16, 2010
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So a one year old thread discussing the merits of an online degree was bumped in order to carry on an evolution vs creationism debate? Sounds like a productive use of one's time.
 
K

kpcrew

Oh, and I have had Dr. Ross as a professor... He says that he had to use evolutionary dating in his work to have the dissertation actually reviewed and accepted by his peers. Judging from the attitude of the people in this thread I can see why.

And to the OP which I have completely ignored, don't do online.
rofl op is from over a year ago and is not a poster here

"judging from the attitude of the people in this thread"
yea sorry for not believing your 10,000 year old earth nonsense lmao