joygirlx105

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If I want to be a professor in pharmacy, what do I need to do in pharmacy school?
 

ZpackSux

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joygirlx105 said:
If I want to be a professor in pharmacy, what do I need to do in pharmacy school?

Get a PhD in pharmacology or pharmacy related topics.

With a PharmD, residency, and a fellowship, you may be able to get a clinical associate professorship.

Boring.... :smuggrin:
 

dabumba

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joygirlx105 said:
If I want to be a professor in pharmacy, what do I need to do in pharmacy school?
Several things you need to consider:

1. You need to know thoroughly what is pharmacy? pharmacy practice? pharmacology? kinetic pharmacology? dynamic pharmacology? .... something like those.

2. You should be all A's student!

3. You should do the best to impress some, if not all professors, so they will recommend you.

4. After graduating with Pharm. D., do Ph.D.

Are you dizzy now?

:laugh:
 
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VCU07

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joygirlx105 said:
If I want to be a professor in pharmacy, what do I need to do in pharmacy school?
I disagree with the other posts...it depends on what you want to teach. If you wish to focus on research and teach along the way then either a PharmD or PhD is sufficient. You do not need a PhD to teach in the pharmacy cirriculum. For example, therapy is primarily taught by PharmDs. If you want to teach with a PharmD then do a residency (or two) and apply for a facutly position. While in pharmacy school, take all the opportunities you can to teach your fellow classmates. Also, get involved in reseach and practice your presentations.
 

ZpackSux

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VCU07 said:
I disagree with the other posts...it depends on what you want to teach. If you wish to focus on research and teach along the way then either a PharmD or PhD is sufficient. You do not need a PhD to teach in the pharmacy cirriculum. For example, therapy is primarily taught by PharmDs. If you want to teach with a PharmD then do a residency (or two) and apply for a facutly position. While in pharmacy school, take all the opportunities you can to teach your fellow classmates. Also, get involved in reseach and practice your presentations.

how are you disagreeing with me if you're saying the same thing I am.
 

sdn1977

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Yep - I agree with the others. If you want to teach didactically - you need a PhD & you'll also teach in the medical or dental school of the same institution. Yes - grant funding goes along with this. They do expect you to publish & work on research.

If you want to just use your PharmD.....you'll be as someone else said, an associate professor of clinical pharmacy. You'll help teach students how to SOAP, write recommendations, adjust warfarin doses, learn how to go on rounds, etc.....I've done it. Its ok for a bit, but does get old after awhile!

But....I would never, ever join in those who do a PhD - that's just not me! But, I do admire them, for sure! Faculty positions live in an even smaller pond than pharmacists do...so you need to get to know lots of people & NEVER burn a bridge!
 

kwizard

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joygirlx105 said:
If I want to be a professor in pharmacy, what do I need to do in pharmacy school?

Well I agree w/ some of the points of ZPack and VCU. It really depends on what School of Pharmacy you are trying to teach at and how much research is a a part of your faculty appointment. Even w/ pharmacy schools associated w/ major academic medical centers the requirements for faculty can vary a lot for research requirements.

Regardless of where you want to teach if you want a primarily research positions (i.e. >80% of your time) the PhD is the best route to go. Please note that most all universities determine responsibilities in a 80:20 or 70:30 ratio (i.e. research:clinical or vice versa). So the 50:50 (research:clinical) option is really hard to come by if not impossible.

If you are looking to practice pharmacy and teach then at least 1 yr of residency training is necessary (possibly 2yrs if you are trying to specialize). You really don't need a fellowship unless you are competing for a position that requires you to compete for funding/grantsmanship. What is expected of you can vary w/ the vision of your dept head.

If you want to just focus on teaching and clinical practice spend the 1-2yrs in residency training and shoot for a pharmacy school in a liberal arts setting where teaching and clinical practice is the focus for your evaluations and promotion potential (examples: St. Johns, Shenandoah, LECOM).

The downside of many of the clinical track faculty appts is that you may not be eligible for tenure unless you are willing to incorporate some research/funding into your scope of practice. Reason being is that many of the pharmacy schools affiliated w/ major academic medical centers have a large amount of clinical assistant/associate faculty out in the community (hospitals, retail, etc.) and would depend on these colleagues more for maintaining practice sites, precepting students, and various guest lectures.

Grades really don't matter. Just network during your 4th yr of pharmacy school and during residency training will benefit you the most in getting good references and inside info to faculty positions that may not be posted to everybody. Obviously presenting at regional/national conferences helps as well, but a good residency will help you get the "ball rolling".

Check out the search engine on www.accp.com to look at what faculty positions are available and the various requirements and how they may vary from one school to the next.
 

pharmacology

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ZpackSux said:
Get a PhD in pharmacology or pharmacy related topics.

With a PharmD, residency, and a fellowship, you may be able to get a clinical associate professorship.

Boring.... :smuggrin:
Everyone starts out as an Assistant Professor and later move to an Associate Professor.

If you want to teach basic sciences then get a PhD or PhD/PharmD. If you want to teach clinical/therapeutics then a PharmD will be fine.

Either way, both PhD and PharmD will have to do a residency/fellowship of sorts. A PhD does a postdoc (or several). With a PharmD you only have to basically do a single year fellowship/residency in order to get a clinical job in academia.
 
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