medguy24

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How much money can one make working in his own primary care private practice in NYC?
Say he's really busy.. What's the most he can make?
 
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allantois

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Let's see ... if you hire many PAs ...
 

mik30102

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deleted407021

You claim you are a junior in high school and most of your threads have been about how much money certain specialties make. We have our suspicions.
 
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mik30102

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No but I'm applying to a bs do program that's 6 years but makes you commit to primary care

If that's true sounds like a TERRIBLE deal. There are plenty of other programs where you don't have to make such a commitment. It's still to early for you to know if you want to be a physician let alone primary care.
 
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medguy24

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You claim you are a junior in high school and most of your threads have been about how much money certain specialties make. We have our suspicions.
I was a junior last year but now I'm a senior in high school and I'm trying to figure out what career to go into. And now I'm thinking about going to a 6 year bs do program which makes me commit to primary care so I want to know what I'm getting myself into- whats the salary ill be making
 

allantois

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No but I'm applying to a bs do program that's 6 years but makes you commit to primary care
What program makes someone commit to primary care? I just can't imagine a med school being able to force you into a specialty.
 

medguy24

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If that's true sounds like a TERRIBLE deal. There are plenty of other programs where you don't have to make such a commitment. It's still to early for you to know if you want to be a physician let alone primary care.
Well I know I want to go into healthcare (I want to see patients) and I want to make Atleast 200k so the only choices I have are a physician...
I don't want to have to go to school for 14 years and take 300,000+ debt to specialize when I can go to school for just 9 years and have NO debt and make the same money...
 
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deleted407021

Shadow some doctors to see if this is even the right bloody field for you, much less the right specialty and career outlook. You are skiing the wrong questions for your current place in time. Go check out the HS SDN sub-forum to get some information about what you should be doing now to prepare for college and then worry about getting into med school. Now is absolutely not the time to be fixated on things like salaries of single specialties in specific cities.
 

medguy24

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What program makes someone commit to primary care? I just can't imagine a med school being able to force you into a specialty.
Lecom primary care scholors program
It's special bevause it's a 3 year med program and undergrad is also 3 years so it's a 6 year bs do
 

medguy24

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Shadow some doctors to see if this is even the right bloody field for you, much less the right specialty and career outlook. You are skiing the wrong questions for your current place in time. Go check out the HS SDN sub-forum to get some information about what you should be doing now to prepare for college and then worry about getting into med school. Now is absolutely not the time to be fixated on things like salaries of single specialties in specific cities.
The thing is I'm thinking about applying to a 6 year med program from high school that would save me msny years and I'll graduate debt free..
 

medguy24

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Also guys I've shadowed several doctors in different settings...
From what I've learnt I don't really want to do surgery or invasive procedures... I just want to have an office and see patients... And do check ups and stuff to that sort.. So that kind of fits in with primary care... So if I'm going to end up in primary care anyway bevause that's what I like I was thinking I might as well go into a 6 year program and save the time and money
 

medguy24

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I made a list of why I like this program.
Let me know what you guys think:

Leocom pros:
-Graduate after 6 years with absolutely no debt (other college and medical school I'll have over 360,000 in loans)
-I'll be a doctor in only 9 years (other college would be 16)
- I don't need to take the mcat or do research or do volunteer work or do shadowing or go through applications and interviews and I just need a 3.2 science gpa (Other college I need to take the mcat and get a 30+ I need to do research and volunteer work and shadowing and apply and do interviews and get a 3.5+ science gpa)
- since Im just doing a internal medicine residency I don't have to worry about having to ace all my classes and my boards in medical school. (Other college I want to get into a cardiology fellowship so I need to get into a top internal medicine residency so I need to do well in medical school and the boards)
- since I'm not doing a fellowship I don't have to worry about acing my internal medicine residency and boards and having to apply to places ( other college I want to do cardiology so i need to do well in residency and boards so I can get a cardiology fellowship)
 
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medguy24

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SDN will most likely argue against this program, but I think it's wonderful if you know for certain that you want to be in primary care.

Here's information to anyone interested:
http://lecom.edu/college-medicine.php/Primary-CareScholars-Pathway/49/2205/612/2393


*You will not make a million though

There's really just three things I want:
I want to be a physician who sees patients
I want to work in NYC
And I want to make Atleast 200k
The problem I have is whether I'll be able to have that with this program.
Will I be able to get a job in NYC as a primary care physician with close to 200k pay with a DO degree from lecom
 

Hospitalized

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Well I know I want to go into healthcare (I want to see patients) and I want to make Atleast 200k so the only choices I have are a physician...
I don't want to have to go to school for 14 years and take 300,000+ debt to specialize when I can go to school for just 9 years and have NO debt and make the same money...

You shouldn't be going into medicine for the money. It's a driving factor, yes. "Making at least 200k" should not be a goal. Happinss, satisfaction, and fulfillment from your career should be your goal. If you really want to just "see patients" there are other options available. Any job in the ER you get to see a lot of patients. I won't discourage you from becoming a physician, but you should have the right motives before committing.
 
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mik30102

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DO's and MD's make the same assuming the same job of course. 10 years from today (when you hypothetically will be a pcp) I think yes you will make at least 200k due to inflation :p.
 

Lucca

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NYC is a super competitive place to have a job - and that goes for anyone. It is very saturated with physicians. This is something you might not realize until undergrad but the job you get and where you get it is more about you, politics, resume building and networking than your degree or your school - admittedly, the latter do influence the former.

I strongly advise against this program, personally. High school students shouldn't commit to anything right from the get-go, that is what undergrad is for. You are young, time is cheap.
 
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medguy24

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You shouldn't be going into medicine for the money. It's a driving factor, yes. "Making at least 200k" should not be a goal. Happinss, satisfaction, and fulfillment from your career should be your goal. If you really want to just "see patients" there are other options available. Any job in the ER you get to see a lot of patients. I won't discourage you from becoming a physician, but you should have the right motives before committing.
I'm not going into medicine just for the money...
Based on where I'm loving right now, I need to make At least 200k to continue this lifestyle, so I need to make sure I'll make that much before I choose a career..
 

medguy24

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You shouldn't be going into medicine for the money. It's a driving factor, yes. "Making at least 200k" should not be a goal. Happinss, satisfaction, and fulfillment from your career should be your goal. If you really want to just "see patients" there are other options available. Any job in the ER you get to see a lot of patients. I won't discourage you from becoming a physician, but you should have the right motives before committing.
And that's not what I mean when I say "I just want to see patients" I mean I don't want to see patients that are "unconscious". I want to see regular "healthy" people who are coming for a check up or to ask a question about something, to get a prescription. You know basic stuff...
 
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deleted407021

You are living a 200k/year lifestyle in HS?

Your idea of "basic stuff" is what nurse practitioners do, with some autonomy even. Why not look into that?
 

medguy24

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You are living a 200k/year lifestyle in HS?

Your idea of "basic stuff" is what nurse practitioners do, with some autonomy even. Why not look into that?
When I say 200k I mean my parents.. My parents make about 250k a year a we have a pretty decent life in NYC (nothing spectacular but it's great) and I want to know that when I grow up I'll be able to continue this lifestyle that my parents are having with me for my kids...
As for np, well I shadowed one and I didn't see much difference between a np and internal medicine doctor. however, the np barely made 100k whereas the internal medicine made 188k. That's why I'm being swayed towards the internal medicine
 

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And that's not what I mean when I say "I just want to see patients" I mean I don't want to see patients that are "unconscious". I want to see regular "healthy" people who are coming for a check up or to ask a question about something, to get a prescription. You know basic stuff...

Here's the low-down man:

1. We cannot tell you how much a primary care physician in NYC will make in 10 years when you are an attending physician. We just can't and anyone who tells you they can is a liar. Medicine is going through a lot of change right now and a lot can change in a decade. I can tell you that PCPs in NYC make between 120k - 250k, based on data I googled, but these numbers mean nothing. These numbers mean nothing because their pay will depend on how their practice is structured, if they are employed or self-employed, what their lifestyle is like, what part of the city they practice in, what kind of insurance they take (if at all), etc. Primary care practice has a lot of variables.

2. Physicians see a lot more than see patients. Based on how the practice is structured you could do a lot of seeing patients or virtually none at all. These are questions we cannot answer for you, they are decisions you will have to make in the future as a physician and it is impossible to say what options will be open to you or what you will find more enjoyable.

Have you looked at other careers in other parts of the US? NYC isn't the only place to live - although it is an awesome place to live.
 
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medguy24

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Here's the low-down man:

1. We cannot tell you how much a primary care physician in NYC will make in 10 years when you are an attending physician. We just can't and anyone who tells you they can is a liar. Medicine is going through a lot of change right now and a lot can change in a decade. I can tell you that PCPs in NYC make between 120k - 250k, based on data I googled, but these numbers mean nothing. These numbers mean nothing because their pay will depend on how their practice is structured, if they are employed or self-employed, what their lifestyle is like, what part of the city they practice in, what kind of insurance they take (if at all), etc. Primary care practice has a lot of variables.

2. Physicians see a lot more than see patients. Based on how the practice is structured you could do a lot of seeing patients or virtually none at all. These are questions we cannot answer for you, they are decisions you will have to make in the future as a physician and it is impossible to say what options will be open to you or what you will find more enjoyable.

Have you looked at other careers in other parts of the US? NYC isn't the only place to live - although it is an awesome place to live.
I understand that it's hard to predict how much one can make-,thanks fir being honest... It's just that 120-250 is such a big range with one side being extremely little while the other side is more than enough.. That's what bothers me...
And as far as moving well all my family and friends live here and I like my life here and I've seen other places and I just really like my life here and I don't want to have to move.... But it's just so expensive here and if I don't make Atleast 200k I'll have to move...
And if you want to make 200k while still having At least decent hours and have job stability and the pleasure of knowing your doing something good with your time, there's nothing else that comes to mind besides becoming a doctor... However I don't want to spend14 years in school and accumulate 300k+ in debt. and going to this bs do program will fix that because it will only be 9 years and no debt but I'm just worried that from a degree from lecom and being a primary care physician I won't be able to find a job in NYC that will pay over 200k
 

medguy24

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I hate to make it sound like I just want to make a lot of money... I really don't.. I really want to be a doctor. it's just that I also want to continue living at my current lifestyle and I'm scared I won't make enough to do so..
 

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I understand that it's hard to predict how much one can make-,thanks fir being honest... It's just that 120-250 is such a big range with one side being extremely little while the other side is more than enough.. That's what bothers me...
And as far as moving well all my family and friends live here and I like my life here and I've seen other places and I just really like my life here and I don't want to have to move.... But it's just so expensive here and if I don't make Atleast 200k I'll have to move...
And if you want to make 200k while still having At least decent hours and have job stability and the pleasure of knowing your doing something good with your time, there's nothing else that comes to mind besides becoming a doctor... However I don't want to spend14 years in school and accumulate 300k+ in debt. and going to this bs do program will fix that because it will only be 9 years and no debt but I'm just worried that from a degree from lecom and being a primary care physician I won't be able to find a job in NYC that will pay over 200k

Again, there's no way for us to assuage this concern. There's just too many variables - you either take the dive or you don't.

I think that going to undergrad the traditional way - perhaps trying to graduate in three years if you are so adamant about cutting costs and going straight into the workforce - because it will give you room to explore other careers, other options through your university's career services, your interactions with other students, continued engagement in the medical world, etc. Debt is a reality in this country. You are right to be debt averse, that certainly isn't a bad thing and I'm glad you understand what it would take to continue your lifestyle and be able to provide it for your children but this time in your life right now - graduating high school and going off to college - is about self-discovery, self-actualization, and figuring out what is truly important to you when you are pushed outside of your comfort zone. A lot could change from now until you graduate undergrad, I know I have changed a lot. You might never change your career choice, but I can almost guarantee your priorities certainly will.
 
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If you get an interview, make sure to let them know you need a guaranteed 200k salary. They like the initiative.
 
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medguy24

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Again, there's no way for us to assuage this concern. There's just too many variables - you either take the dive or you don't.

I think that going to undergrad the traditional way - perhaps trying to graduate in three years if you are so adamant about cutting costs and going straight into the workforce - because it will give you room to explore other careers, other options through your university's career services, your interactions with other students, continued engagement in the medical world, etc. Debt is a reality in this country. You are right to be debt averse, that certainly isn't a bad thing and I'm glad you understand what it would take to continue your lifestyle and be able to provide it for your children but this time in your life right now - graduating high school and going off to college - is about self-discovery, self-actualization, and figuring out what is truly important to you when you are pushed outside of your comfort zone. A lot could change from now until you graduate undergrad, I know I have changed a lot. You might never change your career choice, but I can almost guarantee your priorities certainly will.
Wow that was deep.. thank you for that.
I guess your right. Maybe I should just go down the traditional path..
 

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Wow that was deep.. thank you for that.
I guess your right. Maybe I should just go down the traditional path..

Perhaps. I'm not saying that I'm right or wrong. I would say my way is more prudent. Mostly, what I want you to take away from what I said is that a career choice and what you do in undergrad is a complex decision that entails more than just money, lifestyle, and what job you get. Those three things are largely consequences of answering the underlying questions "what makes me happy?", "why do I want to work?", "what kind of atmosphere do I want to work in?", "what kind of person do I want to be?", "why do I want the things I want?". I wholeheartedly believe these are things one cannot answer as a high school senior, or even as a senior in undergrad in some cases. There are always exceptions. I have met some very clear minded high school seniors who know exactly what they want, why, and how to get it and I have met people in their 40s who just figured out what they want to do with their lives. It's a process.
 
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allantois

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If you want to go into primary care, you better get there with the least amount of debt otherwise it will haunt you a while preventing you from having the "lifestyle" you describe.


I also want to comment that my undegrad experience has been (sadly) largely influenced by being occupied with activities that med schools "expect" us to do. Had I not have to do them, maybe I would have done something that interests me more, but does not necessarily look great on paper.
 
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DoctorSynthesis

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Why has no one addressed the fact that your life now and 9 years from now is going to be different? You can't plan that far ahead and locking yourself into this program is a bad idea. If you want to reduce debt go to a state undergrad or CUNY or go on scholarship to college. Go to a state medical school. Take summer classes to graduate in 3 years and save time.

Don't lock yourself into primary care from highschool and you aren't promised a 200k salary. You might make less you might make more.
 

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OP, your motivation to go into medicine brings tears to my eyes. If anyone deserves to become a doctor, it is you. Bravo!
 

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After looking at your other posts you have mentioned the NHSC scholarship. You need to examine that much more closely. You will not be working in NYC with that scholarship so 5+ years of your life would be stuck in the sticks. If you really want to consider this scholarship you also need to know it is competitive and that they will be looking for volunteering experience and desire to work with the underserved.
 

medguy24

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After looking at your other posts you have mentioned the NHSC scholarship. You need to examine that much more closely. You will not be working in NYC with that scholarship so 5+ years of your life would be stuck in the sticks. If you really want to consider this scholarship you also need to know it is competitive and that they will be looking for volunteering experience and desire to work with the underserved.
I called them up they said they had sites in Brooklyn that I could work in that's near nyc...
And besides it's not even that necessary it was just a bonus...
 

medguy24

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Why has no one addressed the fact that your life now and 9 years from now is going to be different? You can't plan that far ahead and locking yourself into this program is a bad idea. If you want to reduce debt go to a state undergrad or CUNY or go on scholarship to college. Go to a state medical school. Take summer classes to graduate in 3 years and save time.

Don't lock yourself into primary care from highschool and you aren't promised a 200k salary. You might make less you might make more.
I'm not the best standernized test taker and if I were to go down the traditional route i would need a lot of time to study for the mcat so finishing in 3 years is not going to be possible.. If anything I might need to take a gap year to finish studying...
This program exempts me from taking the mcat that's one of the reasons I really like it
 

medguy24

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If you want to go into primary care, you better get there with the least amount of debt otherwise it will haunt you a while preventing you from having the "lifestyle" you describe.


I also want to comment that my undegrad experience has been (sadly) largely influenced by being occupied with activities that med schools "expect" us to do. Had I not have to do them, maybe I would have done something that interests me more, but does not necessarily look great on paper.
This is also true. If I go the traditional way I'll have to do tons of shadowing, volunteer work, research, studying for mcat, studying extra hard for classes, etc
In this program I don't have to do any of that... The only requirement is a 3.2 science gpa... I'll have tons of free time
 

mimelim

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Based on your two active threads, going to medical school right now would be a mistake. You don't know what you are getting into. Risk of burnout/depression/failure is relatively high. Go do undergrad. You are clearly someone that needs the extra time to figure this stuff out. So do it.
 
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DoctorSynthesis

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This is also true. If I go the traditional way I'll have to do tons of shadowing, volunteer work, research, studying for mcat, studying extra hard for classes, etc
In this program I don't have to do any of that... The only requirement is a 3.2 science gpa... I'll have tons of free time

KCOM has a program with no MCAT. Go there.

You can't be affaird of the MCAT though. Don't worry about it now.
 
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