question about best state to establish state residency

Which state to establish state residency for best chance of admissions?

  • Arkansas (University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences)

    Votes: 8 32.0%
  • Vermont (The Robert Larner, M.D. College of Medicine)

    Votes: 3 12.0%
  • Other (please post the other school below)

    Votes: 14 56.0%

  • Total voters
    25

wmd95

2+ Year Member
Dec 28, 2016
68
4
Status
Pre-Medical
hey guys, I realize this topic has been posted multiple times, but I couldn't find an exact discussion that I was looking for. Basically, I have some time before I plan to apply to medical school. I wanted to determine which state is best to establish state residency in. I think Vermont or Arkansas are the two states I narrowed it down to. I realize that there is only 1 medical school in each state, whereas other better states could be bettter because they have more state schools. But IMO, I would rather put all my eggs in one basket, and go against the grain because my stats aren't that good. I wanted to get some opinions regarding which state/med school is better and what you guys think.

From what I understand: both have over 90% of IS applicants interviewed, and around 40% of those that interviewed eventually matriculate. Am I analyzing that correctly?

In addition to that, what are the pros and cons to each school?
 
Last edited:
Jun 4, 2017
30
152
Status
Medical Student
You hardly could've picked two states that are more different. Live where you want to be!
 

md-2020

The Immaculate Catch
2+ Year Member
Jun 29, 2015
2,298
3,010
Status
Medical Student
West Virginia is the best in the U.S. if you're just trying to get into any M.D. school, and it's not even close.

Somewhere in the Pac Northwest if you're trying to secure a cheap, in-state, well ranked program that has decent in-region acceptance rates (~20% for WWAMI at UW).
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: 700825 and Goro
About the Ads

Goro

Gold Donor
7+ Year Member
Jun 10, 2010
54,355
80,663
Somewhere west of St. Louis
Status
Non-Student
ND, SD, MS and NM come to mind as states that do not accept OOSers. Then add GA, for Mercer, and AL, for U SAB.
 

DBC03

2+ Year Member
Dec 28, 2016
2,432
2,975
Florida
www.thegracefuldwelling.com
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
I second Texas. Those are some of the cheapest medical schools of all time and they accept heavily from in-state applicants.
 

Welshman

He runs like a Welshman
2+ Year Member
May 11, 2016
1,003
1,332
Status
Pre-Medical, Medical Student
Between the two I'd pick Vermont, I think I was reading they get ~90 IS applicants and interview ~80 IS of them
 
OP
W

wmd95

2+ Year Member
Dec 28, 2016
68
4
Status
Pre-Medical
West Virginia is the best in the U.S. if you're just trying to get into any M.D. school, and it's not even close.

Somewhere in the Pac Northwest if you're trying to secure a cheap, in-state, well ranked program that has decent in-region acceptance rates (~20% for WWAMI at UW).
Between the two I'd pick Vermont, I think I was reading they get ~90 IS applicants and interview ~80 IS of them
At the same time, Arkansas interviews all its applicants, so why VT?
 

Carmiche

2+ Year Member
Jun 21, 2015
391
424
Status
Pre-Medical
Definitely Texas. Why move to a state with only 1-2 in-state schools when Texas has 10 MD programs. Baylor might as well be public bc it takes like 70% texas and is also cheap.

EDIT: Why do you think it is smart to put all of your eggs in one basket.? That is the least smart thing to do with medical school applications. What exactly are your stats?
 
OP
W

wmd95

2+ Year Member
Dec 28, 2016
68
4
Status
Pre-Medical
Definitely Texas. Why move to a state with only 1-2 in-state schools when Texas has 10 MD programs. Baylor might as well be public bc it takes like 70% texas and is also cheap.

EDIT: Why do you think it is smart to put all of your eggs in one basket.? That is the least smart thing to do with medical school applications. What exactly are your stats?
Around a 503 MCAT, 3.66cGPA, 3.6 uGPA. I don't think I'd get in anywhere in TX with those stats, and there's way more applicants in TX (interview rate and matriculation rate isn't as high based on stats in MSAR)
 

Carmiche

2+ Year Member
Jun 21, 2015
391
424
Status
Pre-Medical
Around a 503 MCAT, 3.66cGPA, 3.6 uGPA. I don't think I'd get in anywhere in TX with those stats, and there's way more applicants in TX (interview rate and matriculation rate isn't as high based on stats in MSAR)
Your chances are not so great at getting in anywhere with those stats -- 35% to be specific. You should certainly consider retaking the MCAT or applying DO + MD.
 
About the Ads
OP
W

wmd95

2+ Year Member
Dec 28, 2016
68
4
Status
Pre-Medical
Your chances are not so great at getting in anywhere with those stats -- 35% to be specific. You should certainly consider retaking the MCAT or applying DO + MD.
Yeah, I know. I'm going to apply DO definitely. But there is a chance with VT or Arkansas b/c I looked around the 25% mark, which is right in that range. Obviously it's a reach, which is why I wanted to get in-state residency to give myself the best chance I can.
 

Carmiche

2+ Year Member
Jun 21, 2015
391
424
Status
Pre-Medical
Yeah, I know. I'm going to apply DO definitely. But there is a chance with VT or Arkansas b/c I looked around the 25% mark, which is right in that range. Obviously it's a reach, which is why I wanted to get in-state residency to give myself the best chance I can.
Look @ the 25th percentile of matriculated students at UThealth San Antonio, UTMB, and TT Lubbock. Right at 503. Furthermore, TT El Paso or UT Rio Grande should be around the same since they are new schools (no data published yet).
 

DBC03

2+ Year Member
Dec 28, 2016
2,432
2,975
Florida
www.thegracefuldwelling.com
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
Wait a minute, you can establish residency in any state you want, and be considered "in-state" for that school? I was under the impression that there were ridged requirements to be considered in-state.
There are, but if you move to a location for a full year and pay taxes there, that's generally sufficient to be considered in-state. If you're planning a few years in advance, this isn't a bad idea. Heck, if I get passed over this year, I'll even consider moving to Texas.
 
  • Like
Reactions: CAFFEINE! and wmd95
OP
W

wmd95

2+ Year Member
Dec 28, 2016
68
4
Status
Pre-Medical
Look @ the 25th percentile of matriculated students at UThealth San Antonio, UTMB, and TT Lubbock. Right at 503. Furthermore, TT El Paso or UT Rio Grande should be around the same since they are new schools (no data published yet).
that's true. but at the same time, look at how many people get interviews out of how many apply. Not as high as VT or Arkansas. So that's also a question. Would you rather have less interview chances but more schools to apply to (TX, etc.), or only one school and a very high interview chance (VT, AR)?
 

Carmiche

2+ Year Member
Jun 21, 2015
391
424
Status
Pre-Medical
that's true. but at the same time, look at how many people get interviews out of how many apply. Not as high as VT or Arkansas. So that's also a question. Would you rather have less interview chances but more schools to apply to (TX, etc.), or only one school and a very high interview chance (VT, AR)?
Is this data you're referencing from the entire pool of TX applicants? Because if it is, where is the percentage of applicants interviewed published for all TX applicants? If you're referencing statistics for individual schools, that does not adequately represent the chance of getting an interview if you apply to all of the Texas state schools.
 
OP
W

wmd95

2+ Year Member
Dec 28, 2016
68
4
Status
Pre-Medical
Is this data you're referencing from the entire pool of TX applicants? Because if it is, where is the percentage of applicants interviewed published for all TX applicants? If you're referencing statistics for individual schools, that does not adequately represent the chance of getting an interview if you apply to all of the Texas state schools.
Oh yeah, I'm referencing each individual TX school. How does it not adequately represent the chances of getting an interview if you apply to all of them? Excuse my misinformed self by the way haha. Just trying to understand
 

Carmiche

2+ Year Member
Jun 21, 2015
391
424
Status
Pre-Medical
Oh yeah, I'm referencing each individual TX school. How does it not adequately represent the chances of getting an interview if you apply to all of them? Excuse my misinformed self by the way haha. Just trying to understand
Unless you have the cumulative data, there's no way to tell how many unique applicants got an interview at one of the TX schools. Even the data published by TMDSAS is difficult to interpret because there's no telling how many people who applied to Texas schools decided to matriculate somewhere outside of Texas.
 
About the Ads
OP
W

wmd95

2+ Year Member
Dec 28, 2016
68
4
Status
Pre-Medical
Unless you have the cumulative data, there's no way to tell how many unique applicants got an interview at one of the TX schools. Even the data published by TMDSAS is difficult to interpret because there's no telling how many people who applied to Texas schools decided to matriculate somewhere outside of Texas.
That's true. I really appreciate this perspective. Perhaps moving to TX would help because there's more schools to apply to
 

Carmiche

2+ Year Member
Jun 21, 2015
391
424
Status
Pre-Medical
So that's about a 30% matriculation rate out of number of applicants applied. This also includes the TX DO school. Is that worth it vs. a 90% interview rate at VT or Arkansas, and around 40% matriculation rate at VT and Arkansas?
Like I said before, the matriculation numbers are not indicative of "ease of getting in," which is what we are discussing. The 40% matriculation rate vs. 30% matriculation rate tells us nothing except more applicants who applied to VT ended up there. That could be due to applicant choice. For instance, there could be a 100% interview and acceptance rate at Caribbean school X, but only a 10% matriculation rate because people decide to go elsewhere. Matriculation rate =/= ease of getting in.

If we wanted to see "ease of getting in," a better measure would be # of acceptances given out to the entire pool of in-state applicants divided by total # of in-state applicants.

And wow @ arkansas... Pretty low IS numbers. Must feel bad to be the 25 people who did not get an interview.

Edit: here is some more data to mull over, but unfortunately Arkansas didn't report :(
 
OP
W

wmd95

2+ Year Member
Dec 28, 2016
68
4
Status
Pre-Medical
Like I said before, the matriculation numbers are not indicative of "ease of getting in," which is what we are discussing. The 40% matriculation rate vs. 30% matriculation rate tells us nothing except more applicants who applied to VT ended up there. That could be due to applicant choice. For instance, there could be a 100% interview and acceptance rate at Caribbean school X, but only a 10% matriculation rate because people decide to go elsewhere. Matriculation rate =/= ease of getting in.

If we wanted to see "ease of getting in," a better measure would be # of acceptances given out to the entire pool of in-state applicants divided by total # of in-state applicants.

And wow @ arkansas... Pretty low IS numbers. Must feel bad to be the 25 people who did not get an interview.

Edit: here is some more data to mull over, but unfortunately Arkansas didn't report :(
True. But I figure that VT and TX both have very high matriculation:accepted ratios (almost close to 1).
 
OP
W

wmd95

2+ Year Member
Dec 28, 2016
68
4
Status
Pre-Medical
West Virginia is the best in the U.S. if you're just trying to get into any M.D. school, and it's not even close.

Somewhere in the Pac Northwest if you're trying to secure a cheap, in-state, well ranked program that has decent in-region acceptance rates (~20% for WWAMI at UW).
Why WV over schools in TX, VT, or, AR?
 

Carmiche

2+ Year Member
Jun 21, 2015
391
424
Status
Pre-Medical
True. But I figure that VT and TX both have very high matriculation:accepted ratios (almost close to 1).
Potentially, but it's really hard to get this data. It's all speculation honestly.
 
OP
W

wmd95

2+ Year Member
Dec 28, 2016
68
4
Status
Pre-Medical
Potentially, but it's really hard to get this data. It's all speculation honestly.
That's true. I actually called VT admissions today to just ask if they had any data regarding the #accepted in-state vs. matriculated, and they didn't have the data, but she told me that most kids who are accepted will matriculate. I'm assuming that's anywhere from 75-95%
 

mellie0

2+ Year Member
Apr 23, 2015
386
447
Status
Medical Student
There are, but if you move to a location for a full year and pay taxes there, that's generally sufficient to be considered in-state. If you're planning a few years in advance, this isn't a bad idea. Heck, if I get passed over this year, I'll even consider moving to Texas.
Except for Massachusetts. They require SEVEN years of having lived in the state. SEVEN. :boom:
 

DBC03

2+ Year Member
Dec 28, 2016
2,432
2,975
Florida
www.thegracefuldwelling.com
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
Except for Massachusetts. They require SEVEN years of having lived in the state. SEVEN. :boom:
Good for everyone to know! Must be why we have so many Massachusetts folks living in Florida now ...

It should also be noted that you often can't get state residency in a state other than your parents' if you are still listed on their taxes as a dependent. This may vary state-to-state as well.


Sent from my iPhone using SDN mobile
 
  • Like
Reactions: mellie0
OP
W

wmd95

2+ Year Member
Dec 28, 2016
68
4
Status
Pre-Medical
Good for everyone to know! Must be why we have so many Massachusetts folks living in Florida now ...

It should also be noted that you often can't get state residency in a state other than your parents' if you are still listed on their taxes as a dependent. This may vary state-to-state as well.


Sent from my iPhone using SDN mobile
Good point. I think all you really need to do is have a salary that is sufficient enough to be classified as independent, correct?
 

DBC03

2+ Year Member
Dec 28, 2016
2,432
2,975
Florida
www.thegracefuldwelling.com
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
Good point. I think all you really need to do is have a salary that is sufficient enough to be classified as independent, correct?
It might vary by state - I'll see if I can find out. My husband had a really hard time when he was younger - he had a full time job and rented in his own name, but couldn't get SC residency. But I'm sure each state has its own requirements


Sent from my iPhone using SDN mobile
 
About the Ads