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So hypothetical scenario
if the algorithm is applicant-proposing, if i were to rank program x at #10 on the ROL, and program x ranks me as #1 or #2 in their list and they have 2 spots, does that mean I am guaranteed to match at program x as long as I don’t match at programs 1-9, even if other applicants rank program x as #1?

In other words, the only way to NOT match at a program who ranks the applicant in their top 2 (out of 2 spots) is if the applicant does not rank that program at all?
 
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Matthew9Thirtyfive

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In other words, the only way to NOT match at a program who ranks the applicant in their top 2 (out of 2 spots) is if the applicant does not rank that program at all?

Or the applicant matches higher on their list. But yes, in your scenario, the only way you wouldn’t match there is if you didn’t rank them.
 
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Matthew9Thirtyfive

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The actual answer to your question is no. I’m not sure if the users who answered “yes” above misread your question or if they just don’t understand how the match works.

It is absolutely possible to end up unmatched even if your last-ranked program ranks you as its #1. The rank lists of residency programs aren’t prioritized over those of applicants; if enough other applicants assign a higher rank to the program than you did, then you may not get a spot at the program.

You might want to watch the quick video by the NRMP or read a quick description of the GS algorithm. It is applicant proposing, but it still takes program rank lists into account.

If applicant A is ranked number 1 by program Z, then if applicant A goes down to program Z on their waitlist, there is no chance of another applicant taking their spot.
 
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NotAProgDirector

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Agreed, but to be a nerd about it, this is independent of the fact that it's applicant proposing. The same result/answer if the alg was program proposing.
 
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Cognovi

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As far ranking behavior goes, the applicant-proposing part of it is only relevant to the question of if you had truncated your list at one rank above which you would have matched, what is the chance that you would have still matched? In the older, program-proposing algorithm, there is a tiny chance, on the order of 1 in 1000. In the newer, applicant-proposing algorithm, there is an even tinier chance. Vice versa is true if a program decided to truncate their list.

It's more of an academic question. The overwhelming outcome in either system if you truncated your list is that you would become unmatched.

Source: Design of applicant proposing matching algorithm; comparison with existing NRMP algorithm

The change from program-proposing to applicant-proposing was to benefit a few applicants (again on the order of 1 in 1000) who might find their fate caught up in the complexities of the algorithm's solution due to the so-called Match variations from a simple market, such as couples matching, programs that can shift positions if unfilled, etc.

Source: The effects of the change in the NRMP matching algorithm. National Resident Matching Program - PubMed
 

Matthew9Thirtyfive

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As far ranking behavior goes, the applicant-proposing part of it is only relevant to the question of if you had truncated your list at one rank above which you would have matched, what is the chance that you would have still matched? In the older, program-proposing algorithm, there is a tiny chance, on the order of 1 in 1000. In the newer, applicant-proposing algorithm, there is an even tinier chance. Vice versa is true if a program decided to truncate their list.

It's more of an academic question. The overwhelming outcome in either system if you truncated your list is that you would become unmatched.

Source: Design of applicant proposing matching algorithm; comparison with existing NRMP algorithm

The change from program-proposing to applicant-proposing was to benefit a few applicants (again on the order of 1 in 1000) who might find their fate caught up in the complexities of the algorithm's solution due to the so-called Match variations from a simple market, such as couples matching, programs that can shift positions if unfilled, etc.

Source: The effects of the change in the NRMP matching algorithm. National Resident Matching Program - PubMed

Yep. Applicant proposing ensures out of all stable pairings, the applicants will get their best possible match while programs will get their worst (note: this just means that it favors the applicant—programs obviously can and do fill with their top choices).
 
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Matthew9Thirtyfive

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Would you be displaced by another applicant who ranked program X higher?

No. The algorithm is applicant proposing, but it still takes the program’s list into account.

If you rank program X at number n and you drop down to number n on your list, and program X has ranked you number m, and they have at least m spots, then you will match at program X.
 

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