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Recommendation Letter Help!!

bruinpredent

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you still have time. make sure to go to office hours and rock your classes this quarter and then ask the professors for a letter of rec beginning of next quarter. make sure to give them some other supplemental info so that they can write you a good letter; this is rather common at a large university from what i understand, since it is hard for professors to really get to know their students, especially at research based universities.

as for non-science...see if you can get a counselor to write one for you, i.e an honors counselor or one of your department counselors


:thumbup:
 

OregonDent

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I have a great pre-dental advisor that says letters of recommendation from professors will never help you, but can hurt you. You are in the same situation as probably 60% of people applying. What you need to do is find a professor that will write the basic "good student" letter. However, make sure that the professor is the type of person that would just write this type of letter about anybody. You do not want a letter that is blatantly going to state that they don't know you, or something worse. Frankly, I do not believe that admissions even looks at this letter. More importantly, you need a GREAT letter from a dentist. If you do not have some one to do this already, set up a job shadow with a dentist you know personally. Shadow for a few days. While shadowing be on your best behavior and show a lot of interest in every procedure. Most dentists have a slight inferiority complex and they will love to show their skill. After a minimum of two days explain your situation and ask for a letter. If at this point you don't feel like the person is the type to write a flattering letter ask for the letter anyways and set up another shadow with a different dentist (the more dentists the better). I don't know what to do about the non-science professor though, sorry.
 
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nazeeuh

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I attend a fairly large university and even though my classes have been getting smaller and smaller as I have progressed, I don't feel like I have developed any strong relationships with any of my professors. So now its about time to start thinking about who I want to ask for recommendation letters and I have no idea! I know some professors who at least know my first name and know if I set the curve on a test or something, but like I said, I haven't gone out of my way to get to know any of them that well (I know I probably should have been doing this for a while now). My problem is that I don't know what I should do to get the best letters possible in my situation. Also, my state school requires a letter from a non-science professor and I haven't taken a non-science class in about a year. Has anybody else had this problem at a larger university or anywhere?? What should I do? Any help/comments/suggestions you guys can give me would be awesome. Thanks!!!

omg im in exactly the same situation and im starting to freak out too
 

slashnroses19

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ive already approached two science teachers. and they've agreed. i havent asked the teacher who knows me best which is something i need to take care of next week. then i need to ask my volunteer director and dentist my dentist said anytime i need a letter just let him know... my concern is that i'm applying to a large amount of schools and i'm confused about the LOR requirements for each. like one school wanted 3 science teachers but another wants 2 science teachers and a non science teacher. so do i go ahead and get all 4 (3 science , one non ) and turn them in on my aadsas? will aadsas sort out which letters the school wants for me? confused:scared:
 
If you attend a large University the task is upon yourself to establish relationships with your professors. Chances are that they are highly reputable in their fields and would make excellent references. Here are the best ways to get noticed:

1. Sit in front and be an active student
2. Intriduce yourself formally within the first week of class
3. Attend office hours and have good questions about the material
4. Discuss your career path
5. Try to go more in-depth into the class and learn some extra information to chat about.
6. Read one of their papers and discuss it with them
7. Don't be a kiss ass, call them Dr., but speak with confidence
8. Start early, even Freshman year, most schools (Big Ten, and other large research based institutions) have reference letter banks where a letter can sit for the duration of your study time to be used at a later date.


The "Good Student" letter is what 95% of people recieve, its lame and adcoms will not give a sh## about them, if its personal and there is character reference as well it will help you exponetially.
 

pmantz

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If you attend a large University the task is upon yourself to establish relationships with your professors. Chances are that they are highly reputable in their fields and would make excellent references. Here are the best ways to get noticed:

1. Sit in front and be an active student
2. Intriduce yourself formally within the first week of class
3. Attend office hours and have good questions about the material
4. Discuss your career path
5. Try to go more in-depth into the class and learn some extra information to chat about.
6. Read one of their papers and discuss it with them
7. Don't be a kiss ass, call them Dr., but speak with confidence
8. Start early, even Freshman year, most schools (Big Ten, and other large research based institutions) have reference letter banks where a letter can sit for the duration of your study time to be used at a later date.


The "Good Student" letter is what 95% of people recieve, its lame and adcoms will not give a sh## about them, if its personal and there is character reference as well it will help you exponetially.

Great advice, and don' forget about your one non-science letter. :D
 

OregonDent

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If you attend a large University the task is upon yourself to establish relationships with your professors. Chances are that they are highly reputable in their fields and would make excellent references. Here are the best ways to get noticed:

1. Sit in front and be an active student
2. Intriduce yourself formally within the first week of class
3. Attend office hours and have good questions about the material
4. Discuss your career path
5. Try to go more in-depth into the class and learn some extra information to chat about.
6. Read one of their papers and discuss it with them
7. Don't be a kiss ass, call them Dr., but speak with confidence
8. Start early, even Freshman year, most schools (Big Ten, and other large research based institutions) have reference letter banks where a letter can sit for the duration of your study time to be used at a later date.

Doesnt step 7 contradict 1-6?
 
Funny!

No don't be a duesche and constantly raise your hand, asking questions you and the class either know are not going to be on the test, or that you understand perfectly well before asking. Simple put, don't speak just to hear yourself "sound" smart. Most people prefer to be spoken to at a certain level, make the appropriate assumption on how a professor wants to addressed and go from there.

To be a gunner, you can not say that you are a gunner. Its like being cool, you can't establish that with your own words.

Be active and mature and you will go far.
 

pmantz

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Funny!

No don't be a duesche and constantly raise your hand, asking questions you and the class either know are not going to be on the test, or that you understand perfectly well before asking. Simple put, don't speak just to hear yourself "sound" smart. Most people prefer to be spoken to at a certain level, make the appropriate assumption on how a professor wants to addressed and go from there.

To be a gunner, you can not say that you are a gunner. Its like being cool, you can't establish that with your own words.

Be active and mature and you will go far.

Asking questions that go beyond what might be on the test is not being a kiss a$$, it means your interested in the subject. I don't know about anyone else I am not a chem major just to get good grades and to get into dental school, I am sincerely interested in the science. Halfway through my undrgrad I decided on dentirstry. I was the person in the front who asked a ton of questions, not just ones that would be on tests.
Teachers respond well to students who are curious and ask a lot of questions, there are some who come to class to get a degree so they can get a job, some other people are there to do that to, but really love science.
And some people, if they don't participate actively will fall asleep.
 
I agree, and that is not what I am saying. In a class of 250 students, say organic at a Big Ten school, there is a time and place for probing questions. If you are interested in the topic, save the extra or tangent questions for after the lecture or office hours. There is finite amount time in class and should be devoted to the curriculum. The extra questions are fantastic and may lead to research opportunites or TA positons. Questions are great but they should be on topic during class time.
 

pmantz

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I agree, and that is not what I am saying. In a class of 250 students, say organic at a Big Ten school, there is a time and place for probing questions. If you are interested in the topic, save the extra or tangent questions for after the lecture or office hours. There is finite amount time in class and should be devoted to the curriculum. The extra questions are fantastic and may lead to research opportunites or TA positons. Questions are great but they should be on topic during class time.[/QUOTE


I agree, I have had the benefit of attending of a smaller institution.
 

nazeeuh

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If you attend a large University the task is upon yourself to establish relationships with your professors. Chances are that they are highly reputable in their fields and would make excellent references. Here are the best ways to get noticed:

1. Sit in front and be an active student
2. Intriduce yourself formally within the first week of class
3. Attend office hours and have good questions about the material
4. Discuss your career path
5. Try to go more in-depth into the class and learn some extra information to chat about.
6. Read one of their papers and discuss it with them
7. Don't be a kiss ass, call them Dr., but speak with confidence
8. Start early, even Freshman year, most schools (Big Ten, and other large research based institutions) have reference letter banks where a letter can sit for the duration of your study time to be used at a later date.


The "Good Student" letter is what 95% of people recieve, its lame and adcoms will not give a sh## about them, if its personal and there is character reference as well it will help you exponetially.

what if its too late for all that? :(
 

DentalBoarder

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I went to a big school. I didn't really take the time to get to know ANY of my professors. But one professor mentioned in class that if we wanted an LOR, to get an A in the class. I would recommend going to a professor from whom you received an A, and just ask him/her. Make sure it's a recent class. Make sure to bring your personal statement, cover letter, and resume. Email first to make sure he/she will write a POSITIVE letter of recommendation, not just an LOR. Then if he/she OKs it, ask him/her if they would want to have the stuff dropped off at their office or if they have time for a meal. My professors have been really receptive. Despite teaching large classes, they are REALLY nice people. So don't be intimidated. Just ask nicely. Be sincere.
 

vize

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Not sure if someone has already said it, but I know in my situation I approached the professors I didn't know with a Curriculum Vitae. I also sat down in their office and explained to them what I was trying to do with my life. You'll be surprised at how well people treat you if you are just straightforward with them.
 
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