purplepower

10+ Year Member
Oct 14, 2008
68
0
in the South
Status
Pharmacy Student
Hi,

I am a nontrad. student with a family. I would like to do a residency after pharmacy school but not until 2 years after I finish because of family obligations, that will lesson dramatically then. Will it be possible for me to get a residency 2 years after graduating pharmacy school? If so, should I definitely work in a hospital for those two years as opposed to retail?

Thanks so much for your help!
 

purplepower

10+ Year Member
Oct 14, 2008
68
0
in the South
Status
Pharmacy Student
Thanks for the advice. Also, how important is it to go to a highly ranked pharmacy school in terms of getting a residency?
 
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RxWildcat

Julius Randle BEASTMODE!
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Mar 25, 2008
1,406
3
Status
Pharmacist
It's definitely possible to do a residency a couple years out of school, I personally know of 1 pharmacist that has done it and she has no regrets about taking the few years off. Going to a highly ranked pharmacy school certainly doesn't hurt when applying to a residency, but it's won't really make or break you.
 

maliciousdoc

10+ Year Member
Dec 6, 2008
29
0
Status
Non-Student
Hi,

I am a nontrad. student with a family. I would like to do a residency after pharmacy school but not until 2 years after I finish because of family obligations, that will lesson dramatically then. Will it be possible for me to get a residency 2 years after graduating pharmacy school? If so, should I definitely work in a hospital for those two years as opposed to retail?

Thanks so much for your help!

If you do well in pharmacy school and you are a good pharmacist, it does not matter where you go. But if you suck bad, then it might make a difference. But again, if you suck, then why go to high ranked school or any school from the beginning? By the way, how does high ranking schools make you a better pharmacist if you are not. You are not learning anything more or less going from one school vs. the other. Different schools might have different philosophy how to train their students but they are generally the same. You learn the same ****s, take the same damn NAPLEX. My advice to you is, go to a school that is best for your life and family, and financial status and do exceptional well in the program. When you graduate, work in a hospital because that is where your residency will be. But again, if you already worked in a hospital setting, what is the point of a residency? Think again, you might end up doing more than you need to for much lesser pay.
 

pharmacychick01

10+ Year Member
Dec 30, 2008
24
0
land of "uff da"
Status
Pharmacist
I was actually wondering if it was looked down upon to do one year of retail pharmacy (for the overtime hours and thus money to pay down student loans) and then apply for a residency?
 

bigpharmD

10+ Year Member
Aug 25, 2007
744
2
Sunny
Status
Pre-Optometry
I was actually wondering if it was looked down upon to do one year of retail pharmacy (for the overtime hours and thus money to pay down student loans) and then apply for a residency?
Not that it cant be done but I would recommend working hospital if at all possible. Most programs look more favorably on this route. I worked 1 year of hospital before going back and I am in my second year now. Its not that big of a deal.
 

rrr10

10+ Year Member
Jan 18, 2008
30
0
Status
Pharmacist
When I was in residency, I think they looked down at retail experience, but if you have a good reason (such as family) then they thought it was ok. Some places also look down if you go into retail a lot after residency and then apply for a clinical position.
 
Last edited:

billsbills

10+ Year Member
Nov 4, 2008
18
0
Status
Pre-Medical
I don't think that taking a two year break before pursuing a residency will hurt you. In fact a lot of people will view your maturity as a huge bonus. The institution I work at just matched with a very bright and motivated individual who has been out of pharmacy school for four years.

However, the people you interview with are going to wonder what steps you have taken to keep your clinical skills intact. Try to stay as current as possible with the new literature and guidelines that are published.

Graduating from a good pharmacy school won't hurt your application, however I think the single most important thing you can do is to work in a hospital position where pharmacy practice even at the staffing level is progressive. I don't think residency directors look down on retail per say, it just makes it a lot harder to to believe that you have retained your clinical skills. From the perspective of the institution, they want a qualified applicant who can build on what they know, NOT someone they have to re-teach.

Good luck!

BillsBills
 
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