Aug 28, 2016
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I was doing rotations back in April and ended up having a deep needle stick to a needle of unknown source. It was towards the end of my shift, i bled it out and ended up going home. Fast forward a couple of days, i start panicking. I regret not reporting it and now i feel as if its too late to do so (its been 4 months). I tested at 4 months for HIV and hep c. So far so good. Has anyone else had similar experiences? I'm pretty darn terrified at this point.
 

theseeker4

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I was doing rotations back in April and ended up having a deep needle stick to a needle of unknown source. It was towards the end of my shift, i bled it out and ended up going home. Fast forward a couple of days, i start panicking. I regret not reporting it and now i feel as if its too late to do so (its been 4 months). I tested at 4 months for HIV and hep c. So far so good. Has anyone else had similar experiences? I'm pretty darn terrified at this point.
Obviously, you should have reported this when it happened, but what is done is done. Rest assured that transmission of HIV is highly unlikely from a simple needle stick. Hep B you are hopefully immunized against, and Hep C is potentially curable now. Just don't make a mistake like that, not reporting a stick, in the future.
 

Mad Jack

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Your chances of seroconversion at this point are basically nil. I had a bad needlestick event back in the day (HIV and Hep C positive patient with vital loads that were incalculably high on the Hep side of things and on no HIV meds) and I still came up clean. I know it's terrifying, but if you haven't covered on the Hep side of things at this point, you're fine. The HIV end, your chances at this point are one in millions. Your odds of a partner cheating on you or a new sexual partner and giving you either are probably infinitely higher at this point lol. Always report though, and always be careful with needles, because you don't want to have this occur again.
 
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Psai

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4 months is more than enough. Your chances of getting positive even from someone with known virus and fluids is relatively low.

That said, you're not supposed to try to bleed it.
 
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Aug 28, 2016
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What do you guys think about PCR/RNA testing at this point for hiv and hep c? yay or nay?
 

Syncrohnize

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What do you guys think about PCR/RNA testing at this point for hiv and hep c? yay or nay?
YouvE already had a ELISA. If it's negative, you're good to go. That's the point of screening tests...


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VisionaryTics

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Always get tested and always go through the proper process (your school usually tells you what to do, i.e. go to ER vs. employee health etc).

God forbid you ended up contracting something or needing post-exposure prophylaxis, your employer has insurance to cover the costs. Otherwise it's YOU covering the costs. And I hear Harvoni is expensive.

I've stabbed myself twice in residency so far and never regretted scrubbing out to get tested. Look at all the worry you're dealing with.