EUA

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....so, because we don't have to do the internship (*weeping with joy for the third time today*) do we still have to take the ACLS course during orientation for residency, or does that vary by institution? Some of the residents where I matched took it and some didn't. I know it's piddly on the grand scheme of things, but if I can avoid 8 hours of that torture I would rather...
 

cytoborg

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EUA said:
....so, because we don't have to do the internship (*weeping with joy for the third time today*) do we still have to take the ACLS course during orientation for residency, or does that vary by institution? Some of the residents where I matched took it and some didn't. I know it's piddly on the grand scheme of things, but if I can avoid 8 hours of that torture I would rather...
I think if you have to take it, they will tell you. It would probably be part of orientation in June.

Doesn't matter for me...we have to take it to graduate med school. :mad: :scared:
 

cytoborg

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yaah said:
I had to take it to graduate too. And at my program it is required, although I wouldn't be surprised if some residents just ignored the requirement and never got certified.

It does vary by hospital though.
Considering that we do have patient contact on several services (BB/trans med, cyto, bone marrow, etc) it seems like we would need to be ACLS certified in case somebody crumps and we are the first responder.
 

geddy

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cytoborg said:
Considering that we do have patient contact on several services (BB/trans med, cyto, bone marrow, etc) it seems like we would need to be ACLS certified in case somebody crumps and we are the first responder.
Hey, good luck with that :)
 

b&ierstiefel

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cytoborg said:
Considering that we do have patient contact on several services (BB/trans med, cyto, bone marrow, etc) it seems like we would need to be ACLS certified in case somebody crumps and we are the first responder.
another reason for you to not to CP wheels. :laugh:

i'm just kidding.
 

yaah

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cytoborg said:
Considering that we do have patient contact on several services (BB/trans med, cyto, bone marrow, etc) it seems like we would need to be ACLS certified in case somebody crumps and we are the first responder.
Yeah but the nurses and support staff know ACLS. All you really have to know is how to go call for help. Wouldn't hurt to know CPR, but the chances of you being alone and having to run an ACLS protocol (at least past the initial few minutes BLS stage) is vanishingly small.
 

cytoborg

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yaah said:
Yeah but the nurses and support staff know ACLS. All you really have to know is how to go call for help. Wouldn't hurt to know CPR, but the chances of you being alone and having to run an ACLS protocol (at least past the initial few minutes BLS stage) is vanishingly small.
Well, that's good to know.
 

stormjen

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I was in one or two situations on clinical rotations where I thought that help was needed but literally did not know the best way to get it. One was in the ER: my patient was unstable (tachypnea, and hemodynamically unstable), I was there for a consult, and I didn't even know who the ER docs were. All I could do was stick my head out the curtain and tell the nearest person.

The second situation resulted in my patient going into cardiac arrest and becoming a vegetable. This patient was sent to the general medicine floor from the ER. He may very well have been stable in the ER, but they gave him a bolus of fluid that sent him from stable into extreme respiratory distress. I was sent to do the H&P on the patient by myself and at least had the wherewithall to see that I wasn't adequately trained to handle the situation. I went and got the person above me, the intern. God help us but he was too incompetent to deal with it too, and I think the time lag between the patient getting sent to the floor then finally getting sent to the ICU where he needed to be intubated was too long... he ended up going into cardiac arrest during transport.

Why god why don't they teach med students how to respond to critical situations like that? We should know who to call if there's a serious situation like that. Going up the hierarchy like we're supposed to results in terrible delays in medical treatment.

Sorry for the tangent, but this is probably one of the worst stories from my training. If this had been a patient of higher socioeconomic status, I believe the hospital would have been sued. "Luckily" for them, he was a poor African American male whose family lacked the education to even know they'd been wronged.
 

cytoborg

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stormjen said:
I was in one or two situations on clinical rotations where I thought that help was needed but literally did not know the best way to get it. One was in the ER: my patient was unstable (tachypnea, and hemodynamically unstable), I was there for a consult, and I didn't even know who the ER docs were. All I could do was stick my head out the curtain and tell the nearest person.

The second situation resulted in my patient going into cardiac arrest and becoming a vegetable. This patient was sent to the general medicine floor from the ER. He may very well have been stable in the ER, but they gave him a bolus of fluid that sent him from stable into extreme respiratory distress. I was sent to do the H&P on the patient by myself and at least had the wherewithall to see that I wasn't adequately trained to handle the situation. I went and got the person above me, the intern. God help us but he was too incompetent to deal with it too, and I think the time lag between the patient getting sent to the floor then finally getting sent to the ICU where he needed to be intubated was too long... he ended up going into cardiac arrest during transport.

Why god why don't they teach med students how to respond to critical situations like that? We should know who to call if there's a serious situation like that. Going up the hierarchy like we're supposed to results in terrible delays in medical treatment.

Sorry for the tangent, but this is probably one of the worst stories from my training. If this had been a patient of higher socioeconomic status, I believe the hospital would have been sued. "Luckily" for them, he was a poor African American male whose family lacked the education to even know they'd been wronged.
As for the former story, I've been in the same situation in the ED. Dignity goes to the wind as you're dashing from a room yelling, "Help! Help! Some help in here!" As for the second story, wow....that must have been sad and difficult for you. Like you I didn't even know how to call a code until my 4th yr...I don't know why they don't bother to mention this critical piece of information the first day on the wards!!! :mad:
 

yaah

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Indeed - they teach you BLS prior to 3rd year but BLS doesn't really help you in those situations. I guess it's just hard to teach. You sort of just have to know what to do, which comes from seeing codes and participating in them. I mean if someone gave a lecture on how to run a code would it really have helped in that situation? I am not sure it would have.