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mdfirst

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ok, I am a smart, inquisiive person, who loves to problem solve. Sorta like a trouble shooter. I also get bored with mundane detail and routine. I will also admit that im kinda lazy too. With that said, what specialties would you suggest for a person like me?:confused:
 

San_Juan_Sun

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ok, I am a smart, inquisiive person, who loves to problem solve. Sorta like a trouble shooter. I also get bored with mundane detail and routine. I will also admit that im kinda lazy too. With that said, what specialties would you suggest for a person like me?:confused:

So you're basically wondering what specialty will tolerate a lazy, inattentive resident?
 

mdfirst

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well actually, im not that lazy, i mean, i get **** done. doesnt mean i want to do it.
 
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Dejavu

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ok, I am a smart, inquisiive person, who loves to problem solve. Sorta like a trouble shooter. I also get bored with mundane detail and routine. I will also admit that im kinda lazy too. With that said, what specialties would you suggest for a person like me?:confused:

ER might fit the bill because aren't they the guys that, within 2 hours, send pts home, to the floor or to the morgue?:)

Seriously, at your residency interviews, I wouldn't mention anything about the boredom with details and "kinda lazy" part.

Plus, please stay out of anesthesia. We don't need people like that. But, on second thought, no specialty does.

A person who is lazy and easily tires of details doesn't sound like a person who could survive the medical school I went to.
 

Drawing Dead

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Well, in the ER, things can get mundane for the OP. I mean after all, my collegue and I joked yesterday that if I had a shift where I DIDN'T have to do a pelvic on a female, something would be wrong. Then again, attention to detail may mean the difference between life and death of a patient. And laziness? I don't think we are right for him as well, at least when he would be on shift.

How about Path? At least he can't kill anyone there with his attitude.
 
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How about Path? At least he can't kill anyone there with his attitude.

Not necessarily.

Don't forget that Path can perform biopsies (e.g. into a breast or neck mass) and that they're depended on to read frozen sections, etc. So a wrong diagnosis can be quite costly.
 

Drawing Dead

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Not necessarily.

Don't forget that Path can perform biopsies (e.g. into a breast or neck mass) and that they're depended on to read frozen sections, etc. So a wrong diagnosis can be quite costly.

Touche. Well, there's always research or academia then. :thumbdown:
 

DD214_DOC

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From my experience, I would recommend psychiatry. Apparently you can check your email during the diagnostic interview and just have the patient read the DSM criteria and tell you if he thinks he meets them or not to get a dx.
 
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