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"There is not enough data to support..."

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jowens817

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Hey guys - I have been struggling with answering questions (mostly Chem/Phys and Biological Sciences sections) that have this answer choice or one similar. Often, I am confident in my answer, but once I see this as an option I find it difficult to not second-guess. Also, I am often confused why this answer is correct when I thought my answer was sufficient.

Any global advice for answering questions with this answer choice as an option?
 

theonlytycrane

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I'm still practicing and these are always tricky for me too. One rule that I follow is if the question says "Based on the figure...", then I know that this choice may be appropriate if the figure or experiment doesn't support whatever is asked. If the question says "What might happen if..." then an inference is expected and this choice is less appropriate.
 

aldol16

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The key to these questions is to eliminate the alternatives. Usually if "There is not enough data..." the conclusion that it's referring to will not be directly supported by the figure(s). You will have to make some assumption in order for it to be supported. Look for the assumption. If it's really supported by the data, then the answer choice will usually be pretty directly supported without any assumptions needed.
 

jowens817

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The key to these questions is to eliminate the alternatives. Usually if "There is not enough data..." the conclusion that it's referring to will not be directly supported by the figure(s). You will have to make some assumption in order for it to be supported. Look for the assumption. If it's really supported by the data, then the answer choice will usually be pretty directly supported without any assumptions needed.
Thank you aldol16. That's what I've concluded, too.
 
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