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Tulane Neurology- Avoid at all costs

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BrainNOLA

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I'm in that program and I would not do it again. Here's why:

1. They're on probation again. They've been on probation twice in the last 10 years.

2. They've had 4 different program directors in 5 years. Wtf?!?!

3. The biggest complaint in the resident survey was NO education. You will not learn to be a competent practicing neurologist when you leave.

4. You will be overworked just to make the attending life easier and in return no education.

I can go into more specifics but that should be enough.

Not worth it.
 

rebel1

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I'm so sorry to hear that you're in such a bad position. Thank you for sharing your experience with the rest of us. I hope your experience improves significantly over time :unsure:
All the best!
 

bustbones26

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I'm in that program and I would not do it again. Here's why:

1. They're on probation again. They've been on probation twice in the last 10 years.

2. They've had 4 different program directors in 5 years. Wtf?!?!

3. The biggest complaint in the resident survey was NO education. You will not learn to be a competent practicing neurologist when you leave.

4. You will be overworked just to make the attending life easier and in return no education.

I can go into more specifics but that should be enough.

Not worth it.

Well, let's face it, even if you are at a top program, you exist to make your attending's life easier. While some programs may offer some awesome didactics, they can't teach you everything. Despite your gripes, I suggest staying well read. Continuums are a good resource and free while you are a resident so take advantage. Study hard for your board exam, pretend as if you are taking the real exam next week, constantly study, you will pass, no problems. Focus in on what you like. I enjoyed headache medicine and have never failed to learn something new with every AHS conference that I attended. Take full advantage of discounted and/or free courses while you are in GME!!

Why so many PDs and on probabation again? I can only guess, but I think others have seen this happen before. Once the well known attendings fizzle out, leave, retire, etc. Now, I know nothing about NOLA and never trained there, but back in my day, everybody talked about how much they learned rotating at Charity (particularly those seeking ER and trauma training). Which is now closed after Hurricane Katrina. I'm sure that hurt! Sometimes programs begin to flop. Hopefully, they can make a recovery.
 
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neglect

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Well, let's face it, even if you are at a top program, you exist to make your attending's life easier. While some programs may offer some awesome didactics, they can't teach you everything. Despite your gripes, I suggest staying well read. Continuums are a good resource and free while you are a resident so take advantage. Study hard for your board exam, pretend as if you are taking the real exam next week, constantly study, you will pass, no problems. Focus in on what you like. I enjoyed headache medicine and have never failed to learn something new with every AHS conference that I attended. Take full advantage of discounted and/or free courses while you are in GME!!

Why so many PDs and on probabation again? I can only guess, but I think others have seen this happen before. Once the well known attendings fizzle out, leave, retire, etc. Now, I know nothing about NOLA and never trained there, but back in my day, everybody talked about how much they learned rotating at Charity (particularly those seeking ER and trauma training). Which is now closed after Hurricane Katrina. I'm sure that hurt! Sometimes programs begin to flop. Hopefully, they can make a recovery.

I just wanted to say that I liked your response. I'm sure many residents are in the OP's position. But "there is no teaching?" Seriously? You're exactly right, no program will be able to spoon feed someone all the knowledge and practical experience that will make them a neurologist. But more than that, how about the other residents? Senior residents are the best sources of teaching. And it is hard to imagine an attending neurologist at an academic place who won't teach during rounds, between outpatient cases, over lunch, or just demonstrate how they do.

I'd suggest finding friends and mentors, identifying the best ones and acting like they do, bringing concerns to trusted attendings, getting through, devoting oneself to learning neurology by practicing neurology.
 

Sitagliptin

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From the program's website:

Neurology Didactics are scheduled Monday afternoons from 1pm to 5pm. Conferences are required and the time is protected with help from the faculty.

Can BrainNOLA elaborate on this?
 

neurogirl5

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I'm a student here and while it is true that they are on probation and have changed PD's, I think that saying someone 'won't be a competent neurologist' is far from true. Working at Tulane/New Orleans is not easy because the patients are very sick, have a lot of social barriers, and lots of times you're all the hope they've got. It creates a double edged training sword. While I find this rewarding in many ways and would choose Tulane a million times over ( I'm a more efficient worker, a better person, and I can make things happen in seemingly impossible hospital situations), this also means that everyone at every level works really hard. I'm sorry that BrainNola feels overworked and not supported. New Orleans is a very unique city with a challenging system to navigate. But while I can only imagine how transitioning to Tulane or starting a residency here can be extremely exhausting at times, in my opinion, the proof is in the pudding. Just while I've been a student, grads left to do fellowships at Harvard, UCLA and Wash U. And I know that upcoming grads are leaving to do fellowships in movement at Ochsner, neuro-ophtho at UMiami....and I can't remember what a couple others said they are doing.

I was obviously concerned about probation, so I asked several attendings/the new PD why this was the case (esp since the graduating residents have been so impressive/great teachers). And the theme seems to be that they were criticized for being heavy in stroke (no surprise in nola) and for residents wanting more protected teaching times. They've hired an epileptologist as the new PD, and are working to expand to have more in-house Tulane faculty in more sub-specialties (As a med student, I can't speak to how they normally cover sub specialties. It's been my understanding that if Tulane didn't have it, they have relationships with other places in the city). And as far as the teaching conferences, I've seen workload force residents to skip going. I think the "Monday 1-5pm" time is a way to address that, but I guess they'll see how this helps. As I've gone through my rotations, the motto has been "once you've made it through Tulane, you can navigate any system". But having tried to jump from city to city in my life and as a non-southerner, I can say that there's no place like nola. As I've been on the interview trail, people seem to respect the skills that you inherently gain by making it through our system. So long story lol just to say, Tulane can certainly be rough, they've had to address criticisms, but the residents leave with good opportunities.
 
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neuroNOLA

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Better listen to more residents who is currently in the program. Website is wild west, anyone can post anything anonymously without consequences.
 
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neglect

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Medical students are tough though. Well, at least one of them.
 

neuroNOLA

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100% agree with neurogirl 5, for an efficient worker and a better person, you know how to manage your time and know how to learn. The quiet and hard-working residents are the backbones of any program.
 

Mjolner

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Is Tulaneneurology ever going to respond?
 
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