Quantcast

Type of Publication vs. Name of Journal

This forum made possible through the generous support of SDN members, donors, and sponsors. Thank you.

Marquis_Phoenix

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
May 6, 2006
Messages
95
Reaction score
0

Members don't see this ad.
Do admissions even care about the content of the publication or its type (as long as it is peer-reviewed)?

Say an editorial or case report to the NEJM, Nature, etc. is better than a primary or review article in some lesser journal.
 

silverlining1

Full Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
Oct 10, 2006
Messages
1,810
Reaction score
3
This is just a somewhat-educated guess, but when you're applying to med school, I'd think that having any sort of publication is impressive, regardless of the journal that it made it into. Going into residency, however, I think you might be held to a higher standard.
 

chutzpah

Medic!
10+ Year Member
Joined
Oct 4, 2008
Messages
146
Reaction score
2
I suppose you could always put the impact factor of the journal next to the publication.

I think they care about # author, impact factor, etc.

Plus they're sure to test you on the information by asking about your research.
 

Kaustikos

Antibiotics 4 Lyfe
10+ Year Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2008
Messages
12,699
Reaction score
4,819
This is just a somewhat-educated guess, but when you're applying to med school, I'd think that having any sort of publication is impressive, regardless of the journal that it made it into. Going into residency, however, I think you might be held to a higher standard.
I would take that advice with a grain of salt. I cannot tell you how many "publications" I read that are not even remotely noteworthy and sometimes a rehash of someone elses work with a simple addition.

But then again, it could work to your advantage considering you have a "publication".
 

Kaustikos

Antibiotics 4 Lyfe
10+ Year Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2008
Messages
12,699
Reaction score
4,819
I suppose you could always put the impact factor of the journal next to the publication.

I think they care about # author, impact factor, etc.

Plus they're sure to test you on the information by asking about your research.

Doc, C'mon Man!

MEDIC!
MEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEDIC!!!

MMMMMDCCCC!
 

JackInTheBox

Full Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2006
Messages
848
Reaction score
0
I suppose you could always put the impact factor of the journal next to the publication.

I think they care about # author, impact factor, etc.

Plus they're sure to test you on the information by asking about your research.

phd120808s.gif
 

URHere

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Nov 20, 2007
Messages
1,784
Reaction score
583

I adore PhDcomics! But anyway, as other people have said, simply having a publication as an applicant is impressive, but be aware that anything you publish now will have your name on it forever. This means that you should only publish if you are convinced that your research is sound, your writing is good, etc. If you have a good paper, then just aim for the best journal for your topic. Many very specific research topics are better suited for lesser-known, tailored journals, than for lit powerhouses like Nature.

While medical schools will always be impressed if you publish something in Nature, the goal of your publication should be to build your reputation as a researcher, not to look good to a medical school. Aim for the journal that is the best for your topic and that will be best for you in the long run.
 
Top