Quantcast

UIC vs Lewis university

This forum made possible through the generous support of SDN members, donors, and sponsors. Thank you.

highschoolhelp

New Member
Joined
Jan 28, 2014
Messages
2
Reaction score
0

Members don't see this ad.
Hii everyone! Im a senior in high school and i have to make a decision on a college soon. I want to do pharmacy (like 80% sure) and I got accepted into Midwestern's Dual admissions program so I do 2 years of orereqs at Lewis then go to Midwestern for 4. I would not get a bachelor's but is that important "in the real world". Also, I would commute to Lewis so I would miss out in the college/city experience..is that worth taking the program? I feel like I'm smart enough to later on get into pharm school but guaranteed sounds easier and less stressful. Also, with the program im tied to Midwestern university for pharm school but with UIC i can apply to any but might still end up at Midwestern so there is not point in doing an extra year or two at UIC and taking the pcat. Sooo which should i pick, the one im guaranteed a 6 year program with (Lewis) or the one with more years and no guarantee but more experiences and opportunities???
 

Pharmd = Phake Doctor

Phorum Hedonist
2+ Year Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2016
Messages
333
Reaction score
489
Is this Midwestern University Glendale or Downer's Grove? The tuition alone is 50K or 40K per year, respectively. UIC is easily half that amount.

Don't feel pressured into pharmacy because some counselor or parent told you it was prestigious/lucrative, etc. Times have changed.

I would go with the cheaper option. Get pre-reqs out of the way at a community college, get a job as a pharmacy technician, then apply. A GPA above 3.0 these days will get you anywhere.

PS. MOST IMPORTANT QUESTION: HAVE YOU EVER WORKED IN A PHARMACY?
 
Last edited:

highschoolhelp

New Member
Joined
Jan 28, 2014
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
Is this Midwestern University Glendale or Downer's Grove? The tuition alone is 50K or 40K per year, respectively. UIC is easily half that amount.

Don't feel pressured into pharmacy because some counselor or parent told you it was prestigious/lucrative, etc. Times have changed.

I would go with the cheaper option. Get pre-reqs out of the way at a community college, get a job as a pharmacy technician, then apply. A GPA above 3.0 these days will get you anywhere.

PS. MOST IMPORTANT QUESTION: HAVE YOU EVER WORKED IN A PHARMACY?

No, I never have. I just talked to family friends that are pharmacists one being a recent grad from Midwestern. Btw its the one in downers Grove, IL but its still 40k.
 

Pharmd = Phake Doctor

Phorum Hedonist
2+ Year Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2016
Messages
333
Reaction score
489
If you're curious about what pharmacy is like, work as a tech in either retail or hospital (or both.)

Observe firsthand, the pressure that is placed on pharmacists by the general public (retail) and by the medical staff (hospital).
Understand that pharmacy is mundane and there is nothing sexy about it. I hear alot of young, naive students talk about having a "passion" for pharmacy. People with the least amount of experience seem to be the most bright-eyed and optimistic. However, it is important to be realistic and listen to those with experience.

Pharmacy is saturated. That is a fact. A lot of greedy colleges opened up pharmacy schools to boost their revenues. In the past 15 years, the number of pharmacy schools in this country has doubled. Too many students graduating, not enough jobs available to them. The majority of high-performing students have avoided the pre-pharmacy track and have gone to pursue Medicine, Dentistry, Physician Assistant, and Nursing careers.

There are several paths you can take in the healthcare field:
  • MD/DO: 7-15 years of hell, but after that a stable high-paying career in which you will never have to worry about unemployment. But be prepared to sacrifice everything you cherish for this 'calling'
  • Dentists: 4 years of intense schoolwork and lab work. But be prepared to pay astronomical tuition (we're talking 250K to 1 million dollars in debt) plus having to front a ton of cash for your own practice. But if you have good hand skills, good business skills, and good people skills you can make bank only working four days a week.
  • Physician Assistant: 2-3 years of school, maybe 1 year residency. But you get to work as a sort of midlevel physician that diagnoses and treats the easier, less-complex diseases. Minimal debt but easily 100K yearly salary. High demand now, so competition for seats is fierce.
  • Nurse: 2 years for RN, or 4 years for BSN. Always in demand as turnover is high. It is a strenuous occupation in which you will be the frontline soldier who is responsible for the well-being of the patient. Plus it offers great opportunities for advancement. If you work many years and advance to an MSN, you will be able to get to occupy more managerial positions in the hospital setting. With direct patient care experience you can apply to PA, NP, or CRNA school.
  • Nurse Practitioner: 6 years of part-time study while you work as a nurse. After graduation you get to be a mid-level doctor akin to a PA. But unlike the PAs, you answer to the nursing board and not the medical board. The brute force of the nursing lobby has allowed NPs to become independent practitioners (they don't even need to be overseen by a doctor!)
  • Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist: 3 years of intense study only after you have worked 2+ years in the ICU. You will be placed in a high stress environment (OR), but the payout is phenomenal. You may start out as low as 120K a year, but with experience and OT you can reach 180K!
If you want to go into the healthcare field, undergrad is something you don't want to waste money on. Go to a cheap public school with a decent reputation (usually the flagship state university). What matters most is you get a good GPA, good work/volunteer experience, and score well on an entrance exam.

Also, shadow or talk with people in other health careers.

Do not go into pharmacy blind. It had a great reputation... ten years ago.

And don't waste 200K+ by going to Midwestern. You can get a pharmacy degree for way less (80-90K).
 
Top