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UTSW Class of 2009!!!

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tgerwuds

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nevermind, found it is my deleted items folder... thought it was junk mail
 

Sparky Man

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USCTex said:
I'm not going to either of these great schools. I also am aware that you can do rotations through lots of places at Baylor and I believe St. Luke's has a mission statement for helping the indigent.

However, I really really believe there is something to be said for the amount and the chaos and the variety of cases you will see by working through a huge public hospital like Parkland. I know all you smart kids have heard that argument before but... :D

To anyone who has to decide (Baylor of UTSW)...you really can't go wrong.

You are very right about the variety at Parkland. I went on rounds the day before my interview with a couple of applicants, med students, and residents. We saw some really interesting cases. They were all over the map which is why I was blown away by the clinical opportunites at UTSW...
 

MadameLULU

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USCTex said:
I believe St. Luke's has a mission statement for helping the indigent.

I'm pretty sure this isn't true, but Ben Taub does! Also, I think TCH will accept people regardless of SES.
 

dcham

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does anyone know where to find southwestern's match list from last year?
 

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Hey JDAD, why did you put class of 09/10 on your signature? Thinking of applying to a one year program or deferring or what?
 

JDAD

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Alexander Pink said:
Hey JDAD, why did you put class of 09/10 on your signature? Thinking of applying to a one year program or deferring or what?

I'm thinking about taking a year to do research after my second year. I guess I will find out more about my options at MS0 weekend. You mentioned something about the research opprotunites on the swmed website, can you hook me up with a link?

Thanks pink.
 

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JDAD said:
I'm thinking about taking a year to do research after my second year. I guess I will find out more about my options at MS0 weekend. You mentioned something about the research opprotunites on the swmed website, can you hook me up with a link?

Thanks pink.

They offer the degree with distinction in research:

http://www8.utsouthwestern.edu/utsw/cda/dept25793/files/133828.html

You don't need to take a whole year to do research man, you can do the 10 week research program during the summer between 1st and 2nd year. If you want to qualify for distinction in research, they require 16 weeks, so you can just do 6 weeks in the school year or do the same 10 week program this summer before matriculation. Of course, they also offer NIH and other research grants to do research (couldn't find the link). Overall, I am not sure how advantageous it would be to do that much research, unless u are sure that academic medicine is for you. Luck :thumbup:
 

JDAD

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Alexander Pink said:
They offer the degree with distinction in research:

http://www8.utsouthwestern.edu/utsw/cda/dept25793/files/133828.html

You don't need to take a whole year to do research man, you can do the 10 week research program during the summer between 1st and 2nd year. If you want to qualify for distinction in research, they require 16 weeks, so you can just do 6 weeks in the school year or do the same 10 week program this summer before matriculation. Of course, they also offer NIH and other research grants to do research (couldn't find the link). Overall, I am not sure how advantageous it would be to do that much research, unless u are sure that academic medicine is for you. Luck :thumbup:

Thanks for the link. I have seen that page before, I think they talked about it in our interview packet.

I like research, but I am not sure how involved I will be, that's why I put c/o 2009/10. I am pretty sure I will be there this summer doing research, but only if I can find a project I want to be a part of. I want to get involved in clinical research, rather then bench work. I will be going down to San Diego in April to present at the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and I am hoping that will give me a greater understanding of the whole research thing.

I am looking into the Dorris Duke fellowship, and that requires a full year off school. Who knows.

I signed up for the "Research" talk at UTSW for MS0 day, and hopefully I will learn more then.

Anyway, have you heard anything from Baylor?

-Back to XXXIX
 

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JDAD said:
Thanks for the link. I have seen that page before, I think they talked about it in our interview packet.

I like research, but I am not sure how involved I will be, that's why I put c/o 2009/10. I am pretty sure I will be there this summer doing research, but only if I can find a project I want to be a part of. I want to get involved in clinical research, rather then bench work. I will be going down to San Diego in April to present at the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and I am hoping that will give me a greater understanding of the whole research thing.

I am looking into the Dorris Duke fellowship, and that requires a full year off school. Who knows.

I signed up for the "Research" talk at UTSW for MS0 day, and hopefully I will learn more then.

Anyway, have you heard anything from Baylor?

-Back to XXXIX

Haven't heard from Baylor yet. Anyhow, the Dorris Duke or other similar fellowships definitely should give you a leg up in residency applications...but taking a year off medical school may not be worth it. It's really about weighing the long term benefits and losses against what your priorities are career wise. I was thinking of doing th 10-week research program this summer, but I think I am going to enjoy my last free summer and hang with friends. After I get a feel for school and after the 1st year, I would probably do the 2nd summer 10-week.
 

Bright Star

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I didn't know that all you needed was 16 weeks of research to have a distinction in research. I would not mind doing research for 16 weeks because I enjoy it but I doubt I'll do it this first summer just cause I want to take some time to relax but if i could do it btwn my 1st and 2nd year and 6 weeks in the school year that would be great.
 

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Bright Star said:
I didn't know that all you needed was 16 weeks of research to have a distinction in research. I would not mind doing research for 16 weeks because I enjoy it but I doubt I'll do it this first summer just cause I want to take some time to relax but if i could do it btwn my 1st and 2nd year and 6 weeks in the school year that would be great.

My thoughts exactly. Of course, I think you have to have a dissertation as well.
 

Bright Star

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Oh a dissertation too - that puts it all into perspective..lol..well it still doesn't seem like too bad of a deal..maybe :)
 

Bright Star

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Okay i now am rethinking the whole process..that's almost like writing your masters thesis..i want to do the research so I'm halfway there but the writing part is what I don't like about it.
 

Bright Star

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I know you need to have done research for some of the more competitive residencies but do you need to have a distinction in research to make it more worth something? I dont know if i am asking the question right but hopefully yall get what i mean.
 

Sparky Man

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Bright Star said:
I didn't know that all you needed was 16 weeks of research to have a distinction in research. I would not mind doing research for 16 weeks because I enjoy it but I doubt I'll do it this first summer just cause I want to take some time to relax but if i could do it btwn my 1st and 2nd year and 6 weeks in the school year that would be great.

It can be a little hard to get something done researchwise in 16 weeks. If you are going to write a thesis, I bet it's better to take a year. You are right, though, that's a big time committment...
 

Zondeare

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Sparky Man said:
It can be a little hard to get something done researchwise in 16 weeks. If you are going to write a thesis, I bet it's better to take a year. You are right, though, that's a big time committment...


You'd be surprised! I did the 10 week research project this summer and am now 1st author on a publication. I learned more than I ever dreamt I could learn in those 10 weeks (I did clinical research with depression). 6 more weeks and I'll be done. It's so nice they give us so many options. I could do research again this summer, or take a research rotation in my 3rd or 4th year or any combination of them. The thesis isn't as bad as it looks either. Most of them aren't 100 pages long.

I did research in undergrad, but that was nothing like this. If you find a good mentor, you'll have a great experience.
 

Bright Star

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Thanks for the info Zondeare..how do you go about picking what lab you want to do research in? I am an engineer and i did research in depression for 2 years but I was mostly doing signal processing/data analyzation stuff. If I do research again I want to do more hands on type of things. Are the researchers willing to take in someone that needs to learn how to do different techniques in the lab? I have taken microbiology so I know some stuff but I havent had to use them extensively in a lab setting.
 

Zondeare

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No experience is needed at all. Usually the mentors have the mindset of trying to teach you new things. They don't pay you(the school itself does)- in fact they have little invested in you except they might get some free labor. Most mentors just want to help you grow as a scientist and physician. What you do is usually up to you in terms of how deep into projects you want to get.

Research is a great experience to allow you to get a broader perspective on something that interests you. Pick several labs initially due to what projects sound interesting to you. From there, email the mentors in charge. Usually they'll want to set up a meeting to talk to you about their research. There, you can ask questions to your hearts content and really get a feel for the type of mentor the person is and the type of environment you'd be working in. That gives you a great jumping off point to tell what lab will suit you best. Just make sure you get into a lab that you'll really enjoy- otherwise your summer will be really tiresome and that's a terrible way to start med school.
 

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Zondeare said:
No experience is needed at all. Usually the mentors have the mindset of trying to teach you new things. They don't pay you(the school itself does)- in fact they have little invested in you except they might get some free labor. Most mentors just want to help you grow as a scientist and physician. What you do is usually up to you in terms of how deep into projects you want to get.

Research is a great experience to allow you to get a broader perspective on something that interests you. Pick several labs initially due to what projects sound interesting to you. From there, email the mentors in charge. Usually they'll want to set up a meeting to talk to you about their research. There, you can ask questions to your hearts content and really get a feel for the type of mentor the person is and the type of environment you'd be working in. That gives you a great jumping off point to tell what lab will suit you best. Just make sure you get into a lab that you'll really enjoy- otherwise your summer will be really tiresome and that's a terrible way to start med school.

You (or someone) said that it is possible to get the requisite 16 weeks by doing the 10-week program during summer 1->2 and then a 6 week research rotation or something or other. My question is how/when do you fit in the additional 6 weeks of research required for a distinction in research, and also, how much free time is available to work on your thesis (probably a dumb question:free time, what's that?). Thanks for the help. :thumbup:
 

heeter

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I have been thinking about doing a research project before school starts but I'm thinking that I'd rather have my pre-M1 summer free to travel and relax. What is the consensus? I've read a few students who suggest taking it easy this summer b/c there will be plenty to do very soon. Also, I'm not sure what type of lab or project I'd be interested in and maybe need a year at the institution to get the lay of the land so to speak.
 

Zondeare

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You (or someone) said that it is possible to get the requisite 16 weeks by doing the 10-week program during summer 1->2 and then a 6 week research rotation or something or other. My question is how/when do you fit in the additional 6 weeks of research required for a distinction in research, and also, how much free time is available to work on your thesis (probably a dumb question:free time, what's that?). Thanks for the help.

You can do research rotations in the 3rd and 4th years to make up the other 6 weeks. It's actually fairly common. People really love it in general because it's a lot lower stress than working in the hospital, but it's still work- it looks better than taking the rotation off.

As for free time, it does exist. I know we all say we are stressed beyond belief. But, you can do anything you want (within reason). It depends on how important it is to you. I have a fellow first year who actually kept his part time job teaching at Kaplan for the MCAT - he works about 15 hrs a week. NOT that I actually RECOMMEND that. You just have to work a lot more than you are used to working. I'm not at the top of my class because I choose NOT to study like the people at the top study. It's a conscious choice as to what's more important and what you are willing to sacrifice. You just have to be better structured.

As for writing a thesis in your 3rd/4th year, I think most people (as in most of the whole 10-15 people who get the MD with distinction in research) take a rotation off to do that. Again, it's relatively low stress and it isn't like you are just doing nothing like a lot of people- so it still looks pretty good on a CV.

Most people opt not to get the higher distinction. It depends on what residency you want to go into and on what is important to you. I have every intention on finishing my 16 weeks of research, but I still don't think I'll write the thesis. I am not interested in a really competitive residency.

I think that you have a long time to figure things out. It's doable. Don't worry about it too much now.
 

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Zondeare said:
You can do research rotations in the 3rd and 4th years to make up the other 6 weeks. It's actually fairly common. People really love it in general because it's a lot lower stress than working in the hospital, but it's still work- it looks better than taking the rotation off.

As for free time, it does exist. I know we all say we are stressed beyond belief. But, you can do anything you want (within reason). It depends on how important it is to you. I have a fellow first year who actually kept his part time job teaching at Kaplan for the MCAT - he works about 15 hrs a week. NOT that I actually RECOMMEND that. You just have to work a lot more than you are used to working. I'm not at the top of my class because I choose NOT to study like the people at the top study. It's a conscious choice as to what's more important and what you are willing to sacrifice. You just have to be better structured.

As for writing a thesis in your 3rd/4th year, I think most people (as in most of the whole 10-15 people who get the MD with distinction in research) take a rotation off to do that. Again, it's relatively low stress and it isn't like you are just doing nothing like a lot of people- so it still looks pretty good on a CV.

Most people opt not to get the higher distinction. It depends on what residency you want to go into and on what is important to you. I have every intention on finishing my 16 weeks of research, but I still don't think I'll write the thesis. I am not interested in a really competitive residency.

I think that you have a long time to figure things out. It's doable. Don't worry about it too much now.

Hey, thanks a ton for the info :thumbup: I am just trying to weigh my options, and want to plan ahead. Thanks :)
 

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Wow - our poor thread is not very active!

What is everyone up to? I am pretty excited, and eager to meet you all at the Houston meet & then MS0 day.

I've also been considering the summer research program. It really looks like some amazing projects and a hard opportunity to pass up.

Has anyone started thinking about where you are going to live? Any news on availability of the student appartments, I've heard they have filled up completely in the past - or maybe just the one bedrooms. I'm cosidering them for location & the chance to get to know people the first year.

Hope to meet some of you all on Monday in houston!
 

MadameLULU

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Yes, I agree--our thread is almost dead...

www.inwoodonthepark.com
I think this is where a lot of med students live...the floor plans seem pretty nice

If all goes well, I'm thinking of purchasing a condo somewhere though..I HATE paying rent

Anyhow look forward to meeting you on Monday!
 

JDAD

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MadameLULU said:
Yes, I agree--our thread is almost dead...

www.inwoodonthepark.com
I think this is where a lot of med students live...the floor plans seem pretty nice

If all goes well, I'm thinking of purchasing a condo somewhere though..I HATE paying rent

Anyhow look forward to meeting you on Monday!


That's strange, I just found a brochure regarding Inwood on the Park. It's a pretty nice place, and it is right next to the medical school. Walking distance would be really nice.

LuLu, I got an email from my interviewer today also. These little things that UTSW is doing to attract people are pretty impressive.
 

mwhou

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JDAD said:
LuLu, I got an email from my interviewer today also. These little things that UTSW is doing to attract people are pretty impressive.

Thanks for the appartment info LuLu - looks like a nice place, and good prices - at least compared to current houston $$$.

UTSW really does seem to go that extra mile to attract people. I ran across this post earlier, and what they do for the MD/PHD interviewees is amazing. Read the 3rd (last) interview review: link The guy describes the all expense paid, 4 day, 2nd look experience. The student was seated with ross Perot and a nobel laureate at dinner! To me, this just confirms that thier attitude is not simply the result of one or two good people, but instead a positive institutional culture. Very impressive. Others have confirmed that this attitude remains once you become a student. The amount of alumni & community support also seems to confirm this. :thumbup:
 

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Hi y'all. Regarding inwoodonthepark...it sure does look like a nice place, but the reviews from apartmentratings.com aren't very good, albeit most folks who review anything are usually those with the worst experiences...still...just a thought. from what i have heard and read, MedPark (student apts) >>> Inwood. lots of folks also live at 5225 Maple or something like that.
 

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mwhou said:
Thanks for the appartment info LuLu - looks like a nice place, and good prices - at least compared to current houston $$$.

UTSW really does seem to go that extra mile to attract people. I ran across this post earlier, and what they do for the MD/PHD interviewees is amazing. Read the 3rd (last) interview review: link The guy describes the all expense paid, 4 day, 2nd look experience. The student was seated with ross Perot and a nobel laureate at dinner! To me, this just confirms that thier attitude is not simply the result of one or two good people, but instead a positive institutional culture. Very impressive. Others have confirmed that this attitude remains once you become a student. The amount of alumni & community support also seems to confirm this. :thumbup:

Yeah, I agree. I also got an email from my interviewer. I must now say that after all that they have done to make me feel like they actually want me adn want to work with me (and all students) I am 50/50 Baylor, UTSW! What a decision that will be to make!
 

runner1979

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MadameLULU said:
So who besides mwhou and I are attending the dinner tomorrow?

Wish I could be there, but I'm off to NYC for a while....See you guys at MSZero Day!

Quick Question: When the MSZero stuff says casual are we talking jeans casual or business casual?

Ya'll have a good one!
 

Zondeare

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runner1979 said:
Wish I could be there, but I'm off to NYC for a while....See you guys at MSZero Day!

Quick Question: When the MSZero stuff says casual are we talking jeans casual or business casual?

Ya'll have a good one!

Jeans :) It's worth being casual.
 

ndi_amaka

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AAAAAAAAAAW!!! Congrats to everyone who got accepted!! :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup:
 

JDAD

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Can some of the veteran give us newbies a quick rundown on housing options?

Gracianks
 

ndi_amaka

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JDAD said:
Can some of the veteran give us newbies a quick rundown on housing options?

Gracianks


*shrugs* I live with my parents. My commute is 20 minutes and it hasn't been a problem. I have classmates that live in Denton (30 minutes) and some as far as 45.

There is inwood at the park (closer and cheaper than med park), med park (too expensive), lots of places around uptown (very very very pricey).

If I had a choice I'd probably live in Irving. It's a ten minute commute to downtown and a $200 a month difference. My boyfriend lives in Irving has a 2 bedroom apartment for $650 a month in a nice neighborhood. one of my classmates lives in Inwood in a studio apt for around the same price.
 

Zondeare

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JDAD said:
Can some of the veteran give us newbies a quick rundown on housing options?

Gracianks

No sweat.

What's been said on this thread is all really accurate.

Student housing at Med Park is the most popular option. You'll have a chance to see these at MS0 day. UTSW pushes these a lot and they are great if you want to be in a place where a lot of other first years are at. There is a shuttle that runs to your classes from 7a-10a and 4p-10p.

Inwood on the park (where I live) is a better alternative if you are looking to save some cash. It's actually closer to campus and there is a shuttle across the street that runs from 7a-7p. It's much less expensive because they have discounts if you make under a certain amount of money, for which almost all of us qualify. The rates on the website are all about $100 or more over what you'll actually end up paying.

5225 Maple is a little farther away, but it's still a good option. It's a little more modern than the other two options and also reasonable priced (again, they have discounts if you don't make much money). In these apts, you can have exposed ducts and concrete floors if you want them. It's also closer to grocery stores/etc than the other two apartment complexes.

The village is another popular option. It's a lot further away, but a lot cheaper and has a mandatory minimum age of 21- which cuts down on the college kids. It's very close to SMU, so you still get some of the college atmosphere, without too much of the college atmosphere. I'd guess it's about 10 miles away (15-20 minute drive or more in rush hour)

Buying is an option. People live in Irving, Duncanville, Carrollton, Farmer's branch and Highland park to name a few (but Highland park is really expensive in comparison). Most of the people who buy homes are married and choose places between UTSW and where their spouse works.

Other than that, most everyone else lives on Cedar Springs - there are dozens of complexes near there.

All of these apts (except for the village) are no more than 5 miles away from school. All of them have about the same crime problems (mainly car break-ins which can be avoided if you're careful).

If you have any other questions, feel free to PM me. If I don't know the answer, I can find out for you pretty easily.
 

JDAD

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Thanks for the quick replies. I am interested at Innwood, but the prices on thieir webiste were a little steep. If what you say is true regarding the discounts to medicals students, that is probably be where I will live next yeay unless I can find a cool garage-appartment in the Highland/University Park area. That would be ideal, quite and peaceful.

Is Innwood very loud? I am looking for an apartment without all the distractions.

My girlfriend lives at the Village right now, although her commute to SMU Law school is much shorter than mine would be. It's a pretty sweet deal, (She only pays 405 a month for a studio) but I don't think I want to drive that far. Mockingbird traffic SUCKS!

Thanks again for the info, and anything else specific about your Innwood experience would be great.
 

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JDAD said:
Thanks for the quick replies. I am interested at Innwood, but the prices on thieir webiste were a little steep. If what you say is true regarding the discounts to medicals students, that is probably be where I will live next yeay unless I can find a cool garage-appartment in the Highland/University Park area. That would be ideal, quite and peaceful.

Is Innwood very loud? I am looking for an apartment without all the distractions.

My girlfriend lives at the Village right now, although her commute to SMU Law school is much shorter than mine would be. It's a pretty sweet deal, (She only pays 405 a month for a studio) but I don't think I want to drive that far. Mockingbird traffic SUCKS!

Thanks again for the info, and anything else specific about your Innwood experience would be great.

5225 Maple looks like the best option of the apartment complexes mentioned (Assuming that the discount is true). I am still debating if I want a roomate or not. I wondered if any of the current SW students roomed with a stranger their first year (esp using the roommate website) and if so, how it was.
 

Zondeare

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I do want to give you one word of warning about Inwood. There's a lot of construction across the street. It's not fun to wake up at 7 every morning (thankfully not Sundays, but yes, even Saturdays). I HIGHLY suggest asking for an apt on the West side of the complex so you don't have as much of the noise.

As for roommates, I have a roommate, we went to the same college but didn't really know each other until we hooked up on the roommate bulletin board. I think it's a great way to meet people that you may want to live with. Most people who live by themselves love it, but it's really expensive to live by yourself in the Medical District. Most apt complexes have long wait lists for one bedrooms and the rents on them are usually outrageous. I have to admit though, the life of living by yourself is so attractive that I'm debating on whether I want to live by myself next year.

Things to consider in deciding to get a roommate:
1. Having someone else in med school who is studying a lot as well helps keep you motivated and reminds you that you aren't alone. It is so much easier to study with other people who are studying instead of talking to college friends who still go out every night of the week.
2. all first years take the same classes together, so you'll be stressed out at the same time - big way to get in big fights, but at least you know he/she'll be quiet when you need to study.
3. You'll have to respect each other's need for quiet to study in. If you're dont studying for the night, but your roommate isn't (or vice versa), it's hard to find a place to relax (or study) without bothering each other.
4. At Inwood, all bills included (cable, phone, internet, etc) I pay less than $600/month because I have a roommate. That can easily be about $800 without a roommate (in a 600 sq ft apt vs my 1100 sq ft apt)

It's a personal choice for everyone, and not an easy one.

Sorry I talk so much *smiles* I'm avoiding studying for physiology and this is the most productive, non-productive thing for me to do :)
 

JDAD

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Zondeare said:
I do want to give you one word of warning about Inwood. There's a lot of construction across the street. It's not fun to wake up at 7 every morning (thankfully not Sundays, but yes, even Saturdays). I HIGHLY suggest asking for an apt on the West side of the complex so you don't have as much of the noise.

As for roommates, I have a roommate, we went to the same college but didn't really know each other until we hooked up on the roommate bulletin board. I think it's a great way to meet people that you may want to live with. Most people who live by themselves love it, but it's really expensive to live by yourself in the Medical District. Most apt complexes have long wait lists for one bedrooms and the rents on them are usually outrageous. I have to admit though, the life of living by yourself is so attractive that I'm debating on whether I want to live by myself next year.

Things to consider in deciding to get a roommate:
1. Having someone else in med school who is studying a lot as well helps keep you motivated and reminds you that you aren't alone. It is so much easier to study with other people who are studying instead of talking to college friends who still go out every night of the week.
2. all first years take the same classes together, so you'll be stressed out at the same time - big way to get in big fights, but at least you know he/she'll be quiet when you need to study.
3. You'll have to respect each other's need for quiet to study in. If you're dont studying for the night, but your roommate isn't (or vice versa), it's hard to find a place to relax (or study) without bothering each other.
4. At Inwood, all bills included (cable, phone, internet, etc) I pay less than $600/month because I have a roommate. That can easily be about $800 without a roommate (in a 600 sq ft apt vs my 1100 sq ft apt)

It's a personal choice for everyone, and not an easy one.

Sorry I talk so much *smiles* I'm avoiding studying for physiology and this is the most productive, non-productive thing for me to do :)

Thanks, I plan on hunting for apartments during MS0 weekend, not leasing, just scouting out the area
 

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tokyo robotic
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Zondeare said:
I do want to give you one word of warning about Inwood. There's a lot of construction across the street. It's not fun to wake up at 7 every morning (thankfully not Sundays, but yes, even Saturdays). I HIGHLY suggest asking for an apt on the West side of the complex so you don't have as much of the noise.

As for roommates, I have a roommate, we went to the same college but didn't really know each other until we hooked up on the roommate bulletin board. I think it's a great way to meet people that you may want to live with. Most people who live by themselves love it, but it's really expensive to live by yourself in the Medical District. Most apt complexes have long wait lists for one bedrooms and the rents on them are usually outrageous. I have to admit though, the life of living by yourself is so attractive that I'm debating on whether I want to live by myself next year.

Things to consider in deciding to get a roommate:
1. Having someone else in med school who is studying a lot as well helps keep you motivated and reminds you that you aren't alone. It is so much easier to study with other people who are studying instead of talking to college friends who still go out every night of the week.
2. all first years take the same classes together, so you'll be stressed out at the same time - big way to get in big fights, but at least you know he/she'll be quiet when you need to study.
3. You'll have to respect each other's need for quiet to study in. If you're dont studying for the night, but your roommate isn't (or vice versa), it's hard to find a place to relax (or study) without bothering each other.
4. At Inwood, all bills included (cable, phone, internet, etc) I pay less than $600/month because I have a roommate. That can easily be about $800 without a roommate (in a 600 sq ft apt vs my 1100 sq ft apt)

It's a personal choice for everyone, and not an easy one.

Sorry I talk so much *smiles* I'm avoiding studying for physiology and this is the most productive, non-productive thing for me to do :)

Thanks :thumbup: I also think that it would be beneficial to have a roommate during the first year, for the exact reasons you said. $600 a month is not bad at all for such a nice place with all bills included. I also plan on looking around at these apartrments on MS0 weekend if I can find a ride. Thanks for the helpful info!
 

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tokyo robotic
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Wow, so I am really impressed by the modern look of the 5225 apartments. Contemporary living, architecture, and furniture are very important to me, and this probably would be a great fit. How is the crime rate in the area? I noticed that at 5225 you enter your room from inside, something that seems more appealing to me than having a door to the outside. I can't wait to visit!
 
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