May 17, 2012
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Hey I thought I had this figured out but I just wanted to be sure. I'm a little confused about what state I am considered a resident.

I lived in the same state until after college, where I moved to CA for a year and a half. I recently moved back. I am considered an independent on my taxes and paid taxes for CA last year and am registered (since a few months ago) to vote in CA. I didn't anticipate moving back home, but here I am. I never got a CA Driver's licence (still have the one from my home state) and never opened any sort of bank account there either.

I figure I am considered a CA resident, but just want to make sure.

Does anyone know for certain which state I am considered a resident? Any info would help!

Thanks in advance!
 

LizzyM

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Mar 7, 2005
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Where have you slept (laid your head) for the majority of days over the last year?

Do you have intentions to return to California (still have home there)?

Do you receive mail deliveries in California?
 
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mirimonster

Class of 2017
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Feb 28, 2012
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California is actually fairly strict on the residency requirements. I looked into this a while back because of similar circumstances.

"One cannot establish California residence for purposes of tuition and fees while maintaining legal ties (indicia of intent) to another state or country (e.g. state tax liability, driver’s license, voter’s or vehicle registration)." http://www.ucop.edu/ogc/documents/10-things-grad.pdf

The fact that you never held a driver's license in CA and that you no longer have a physical presence here (Residence requirement 1 - http://www.ucop.edu/ogc/documents/uc-residence-policy.pdf), you are not considered a California resident for tuition purposes.

That being said, you self-identify in AMCAS. I don't think there's any point in the process in which you have to prove residency until after you're admitted, and then I don't think they will rescind an acceptance if you had a justifiable reason for saying that you were a resident. This part I'm a little iffy about.
 
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mirimonster

Class of 2017
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Feb 28, 2012
497
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You remain a California resident until you meet the residency requirements of your new (old) state. Without knowing which state that is, it's impossible to give a definitive answer, but if you've been home for less than a year you're almost certainly still a legal resident of California. Welcome to the fray. ;)

The problem is that I'm not sure OP was ever technically a legal resident of California. Not sure why you never got a driver's license in CA?

Also, here's the link to the full residence policy handbook. What I linked before was the summary. http://www.ucop.edu/ogc/documents/uc-residence-policy.pdf
 
May 17, 2012
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I'm from WA (the evergreen state ;)) I didn't come down to California with the intention of staying for super long, I just ended up really liking it and found work. I came there after college and so it wasn't for tuition purposes or anything, just something new. I never needed to (really didn't want to) drive anywhere and didn't bring a car so I didn't obtain a license. In retrospect, I should have obtained a CA identifying card,but hindsight is 20/20 and alas this is my current situation and so I just need to figure it out.

And thanks for the welcome! Been a long time lurker too timid to post anything. But applications are a hairy process- good to talk to people on SDN.

Based on what everyone is saying and having read through many of the rules and regulations regarding CA residency, I'm pretty sure I'm considered a CA resident. It's rules are pretty strict and that was why I got so confused.

Thanks for everyone's help!! Hopefully it will help others too.
 

LizzyM

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Mar 7, 2005
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I guess the question should be: on what basis are you trying to determine if you are a resident of a specific state.

Qualifying for tuition is different than qualifying as a voter and certainly the qualifications to be a resident for tax purposes may be different.
 

mirimonster

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Feb 28, 2012
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I guess the question should be: on what basis are you trying to determine if you are a resident of a specific state.

Qualifying for tuition is different than qualifying as a voter and certainly the qualifications to be a resident for tax purposes may be different.

You're right. I assumed tuition and preference for California state schools, but it still is really weird and confusing... OP, I'd say identify to the best of your ability. You seem to have it figured out :)
 
May 17, 2012
3
0
Status
  1. Pre-Medical
I'm likely to return to CA this fall. For the past year and a half, up until a couple months ago, it was my primary residence (paid rent, taxes, worked, got my mail there, everything). My most recent address has changed back to my current state. It will remain so for the next few months.
 

LizzyM

the evil queen of numbers
Mar 7, 2005
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If you want to have a prayer of getting an interview at U Washington, go with the Washington address you have now. :D Otherwise, you could argue that you are a California resident (registered to vote there, taxpayer there) who is temporarily visiting Washington State. Generally, you can "visit" for up to ~180 days before you become a resident for tax purposes (big issue in the snowbird states).
 
Apr 15, 2011
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That being said, you self-identify in AMCAS. I don't think there's any point in the process in which you have to prove residency until after you're admitted, and then I don't think they will rescind an acceptance if you had a justifiable reason for saying that you were a resident. This part I'm a little iffy about.

The point in the process is after you apply and they send you paperwork to fill out to prove your residency or literally during the secondary. But, I'm sure there's a few state schools that will just assume you're a resident because you say so. I don't think those schools are very smart.
 
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