Apr 30, 2019
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I have a working interview as a veterinary assistant in surgical unit at my local humane society this week and the veterinarian wanted to bring me in for a working interview since I was a recent graduate that majored in Animal/Veterinary science in undergrad that’s taking a gap year to increase my chances for vet school and gain experience to see how vet clinics operate. I’m glad I got the opportunity but this is my first working interview. Can anyone give me advice on how I can I impress them in an working interview?
 
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mmmdreamerz

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Wear scrubs since its a working interview. Be honest about your experience level. Be helpful. Show enthusiasm.
 
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LetItSnow

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What mmmdreamerz said.

Be eager to learn, willing to enthusiastically do whatever tasks are asked of you, honest when you aren't sure how to do something, friendly and affable.

Worry less about how much you know, worry more about how you present yourself. It's not always true, but for most of us our attitude is "I can teach this person what I want, but I can't change their personality to make them tolerable to be around every day."

Once you're hired, you do need to start showing skill growth, though, or you won't last in my hospital. Don't care where you START from, but you need to steadily move toward 'expert'.
 
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TheGirlWithTheFernTattoo

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I did working interviews for vet assistants at an ER/referral centre all summer. Here’s how I decided what I thought of them and whether I would tell management to hire them:

1. First impressions/impressions I got chatting to them. Be friendly, be willing to small talk, and put in an effort to socialize with me. Our clinic is very friendly and people-oriented (and most vet clinics are). I’m very chatty, so if you can’t manage to hold a conversation with me it makes me wonder how you will fit in with the clinic culture. If their chatting consists of constant complaining (especially about their last workplace), pessimism, or inappropriate topics, they won't get hired. The last thing we want is people coming in and encouraging an environment that could become toxic. The more positive and friendly you seem, the better.

2. Interest and enthusiasm in the job/field/facilities. It’s pretty obvious when someone is interested vs not. Ask questions, be engaged, use your non-verbal body language. My two favourite interviews this summer were both for people who had never worked in a vet clinic in their lives; however, they were super friendly people who were fascinated by everything they saw. Both of them are now incredibly strong assistants after only a few months. That being said, if you haven't worked in the field before be aware of a few red flag statements: "I just love animals and want to save them all" "I want to work with animals because I hate people" etc. Being an ER clinic we are especially worried about people not being able to accept financial/aggression/"convenience" euths. I expect this will also be something that would be important for a humane society.

3. Be willing to pitch in. If there is some laundry piling up, ask if someone can show you how to do it so you can throw in a load or two. If someone is trying to put in a catheter and you know how to restrain safely, offer to hold for them. If the floor is covered in fur, find a broom. If anyone offers to show/teach you something, accept! (Unless you don't feel safe or comfortable). That being said, don't go ahead and do things without checking that it is okay. Liability is a thing and a lot of places won't be comfortable with you doing something that puts you at risk for being injured/bitten/scratched.

4. If the person doing your working interview is another assistant (and not management/vet/tech), treat them the exact same that you would have treated the others. I had one interviewee this summer that immediately lost all air of respect after finding out that I was an assistant, and became overly casual with me during the day (complaining about the offered wage, etc). They did not get hired.

At the end of the day, the goal is to answer the question "would I want to work with this person?". If you are friendly, have social skills, and seem teachable, the answer will be yes. Good luck, I'm sure you will do great!
 
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biomajor2019

LMU-CVM C/O 2025
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Jan 12, 2018
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As someone who also does working interviews for potential vet assistants at the hospital I work at, I 1000% agree with @TheGirlWithTheFernTattoo ! Show enthusiasm, respect, interest, and a willingness to learn and help!
 
Apr 30, 2019
8
2
Status
  1. Pre-Veterinary
I did working interviews for vet assistants at an ER/referral centre all summer. Here’s how I decided what I thought of them and whether I would tell management to hire them:

1. First impressions/impressions I got chatting to them. Be friendly, be willing to small talk, and put in an effort to socialize with me. Our clinic is very friendly and people-oriented (and most vet clinics are). I’m very chatty, so if you can’t manage to hold a conversation with me it makes me wonder how you will fit in with the clinic culture. If their chatting consists of constant complaining (especially about their last workplace), pessimism, or inappropriate topics, they won't get hired. The last thing we want is people coming in and encouraging an environment that could become toxic. The more positive and friendly you seem, the better.

2. Interest and enthusiasm in the job/field/facilities. It’s pretty obvious when someone is interested vs not. Ask questions, be engaged, use your non-verbal body language. My two favourite interviews this summer were both for people who had never worked in a vet clinic in their lives; however, they were super friendly people who were fascinated by everything they saw. Both of them are now incredibly strong assistants after only a few months. That being said, if you haven't worked in the field before be aware of a few red flag statements: "I just love animals and want to save them all" "I want to work with animals because I hate people" etc. Being an ER clinic we are especially worried about people not being able to accept financial/aggression/"convenience" euths. I expect this will also be something that would be important for a humane society.

3. Be willing to pitch in. If there is some laundry piling up, ask if someone can show you how to do it so you can throw in a load or two. If someone is trying to put in a catheter and you know how to restrain safely, offer to hold for them. If the floor is covered in fur, find a broom. If anyone offers to show/teach you something, accept! (Unless you don't feel safe or comfortable). That being said, don't go ahead and do things without checking that it is okay. Liability is a thing and a lot of places won't be comfortable with you doing something that puts you at risk for being injured/bitten/scratched.

4. If the person doing your working interview is another assistant (and not management/vet/tech), treat them the exact same that you would have treated the others. I had one interviewee this summer that immediately lost all air of respect after finding out that I was an assistant, and became overly casual with me during the day (complaining about the offered wage, etc). They did not get hired.

At the end of the day, the goal is to answer the question "would I want to work with this person?". If you are friendly, have social skills, and seem teachable, the answer will be yes. Good luck, I'm sure you will do great!

Best advice given!!! The vet told me about how they do a lot of euthanasias since they do work in the humane society and it can happen, but I have experienced with that by shadowing a vet in the past and it can be hard to watch, but knowing that they're in a better place makes me think they don't have to suffer anymore. Thank you so much!
 
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vetsquared

c/o 2025!
Aug 16, 2019
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You guys are awesome! This thread was super aptly timed because I also had a working interview this week (which resulted in an offer!), and I have another one coming up on Monday! My upcoming working interview is at an exotics-only practice and I have literally zero experience with exotics, so I was wondering if there is any specific advice/things to be aware of regarding exotics? Or just follow the advice above and keep doing what I'm doing? Thanks all!
 

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