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Worth Transferring to USC?

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ringtingtin98

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Hello! I have kind of a lot to say but I'll try and make it brief! I am a prospective transfer applicant for USC and I was wondering whether it would be worth it to transfer. I wanted to attend USC as a freshman, but was rejected. I did apply to UT Austin and was accepted (yay). Unfortunately, I want to change my major into BME, however internal transfers at UT are really tough and getting into BME as an internal transfer is highly competitive. Not only this, but once I get in, the curriculum and courses are dense and only offered once a year, so the fastest I can graduate is by may 2020 (5 years instead of 4, not ideal bc I'm premed and poor). Other alternate plans are maybe to also apply for mechanical or chemical engineering, however these are also of course, extremely competitive.

So, I've tried to change my mind from that and do something like the new public health program at UT. Apparently, the professor is really really terrible, which wouldn't bother me, except that he teaches ALL the PBH classes. SO, this brings us to looking into transferring. One of the reasons I liked USC was because of its flexible degree plans and the fact that I could possibly explore both their amazing global health program AND a discipline in Viterbi's engineering. This first semester at UT has been great, however my GPA is rather low (3.1). That was from a semester of classes like calculus, chemistry, and bio. And although next semester I'm taking all maths and sciences, I will definitely not let any personal problems I'm currently dealing with get in the way...and I will raise my GPA.

NOW, the question is, is it worth applying to USC as a transfer, despite my first semester's rather low GPA? I do really think that USC can give me the flexible, yet cohesive undergrad experience I desire, but I'm not sure how competitive I am.

A couple more questions: Is it particularly easier to get into USC as Global Health or Engineering? Or does that not matter in regards to gaining acceptance into the university? I'd like to do both somehow (whether that'd be double majoring or some sort of international health minor). Maybe some other ways to make me more competitive, besides raising my GPA


NOW, which school would be better for premed? UT Austin or USC? Any input would be much appreciated! Especially if you went to USC!
 
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I'm only a high school senior, so I can't answer your other questions, but I do know that at USC, students are first admitted to dornsife. Then, if you've shown interest in the specialty schools such as kaufman, marshal, viterbi etc those colleges will read your application a second time to determine if you should get in or not. So, it's easier to get through dornsife. Viterbi applicants also have an additional essay to write, although idk if that applies for transfer students as well.
In terms of fit, usc's whole shtick is that it is super interdisciplinary. I just interviewed there and have attended many information sessions, and they will not stop shoving that down my throat. They really value dynamic students who want to double major, such as yourself. I would def. apply, and make sure to craft an essay that is really personal for USC and that shows that you will take advantage of the opportunities there to branch out within the different colleges!
 

candbgirl

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What makes you thinking USC will take you this time around? Is it closer to home and family? Are you happy at UTAustin? Which is cheaper? Are you from Texas? Have you visited with teachers etc in the BME program at UTAustin? What makes you think you'll be happy in the program? Have you taken any classes in the department? One thing for sure you should be considering your low GPA. I know you said it won't happen again but the world is filled with good intentions.
 

ringtingtin98

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What makes you thinking USC will take you this time around? Is it closer to home and family? Are you happy at UTAustin? Which is cheaper? Are you from Texas? Have you visited with teachers etc in the BME program at UTAustin? What makes you think you'll be happy in the program? Have you taken any classes in the department? One thing for sure you should be considering your low GPA. I know you said it won't happen again but the world is filled with good intentions.


I am happy at UT Austin, I do enjoy going there, but I'm trying to get into BME and it's actually really competitive and I'm not saying that I can't do it; I just really need to weigh my options here because there is a possibility that I won't get in. I have actually talked to BME prof's at the department; there are a few who are MD's, yet work in the BME department! I spoke with them about this because I am eventually looking to do a dual PhD/MD program at the med school I go to ( I would get the PhD in BME).

So, if I don't get into BME at UT Austin, I can't really try again because I could gain too many credits (making me a junior) and also my graduation would be postponed even more. USC can provide me with a possibility of doing BME AND maybe having some sort of minor or double major in another field (like Global Health or International Studies). And yes, I am from texas so UT is def cheaper, but I do believe I would be able to afford USC given I receive at least their avg aid given.

Honestly, I feel a bit stuck, so I'm trying to get myself more options.
 

ringtingtin98

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I'm only a high school senior, so I can't answer your other questions, but I do know that at USC, students are first admitted to dornsife. Then, if you've shown interest in the specialty schools such as kaufman, marshal, viterbi etc those colleges will read your application a second time to determine if you should get in or not. So, it's easier to get through dornsife. Viterbi applicants also have an additional essay to write, although idk if that applies for transfer students as well.
In terms of fit, usc's whole shtick is that it is super interdisciplinary. I just interviewed there and have attended many information sessions, and they will not stop shoving that down my throat. They really value dynamic students who want to double major, such as yourself. I would def. apply, and make sure to craft an essay that is really personal for USC and that shows that you will take advantage of the opportunities there to branch out within the different colleges!

Wow, that's actually really awesome! I knew they facilitated double majoring a bit more than other schools, but I didn't know they emphasized it that much!
 
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carpediem22

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I went to USC for two years before transferring out to go to another school.

I wasn't in Viterbi so I can't really comment on that, but the school seems strong from what I can tell. However, I will say that the cost difference is NOT something to scoff at. USC gave me horrible aid -- in fact, I received 30k more from the school I transferred to, in the same tax year. Not saying it would do the same to you, but students who aren't on scholarships generally pay quite a bit. Hence the oft-cited nickname "University of Spoiled Children".

My $0.02 are that unless you are really unhappy at UT, stay there and try to work to get into BME or do something else. UT is a really good school, and USC is not worth paying an arm and a leg more for.

Also, a word on USC's interdisciplinary feel -- it is not that way between schools. Once you are in Dornscife, it is hard to transfer into Marshall, Viterbi, etc. So you would really need to get into Viterbi right off the bat, especially since you won't be coming in a freshman.
 
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