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2015-2016 Interview Reviews

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Rogue Penguin

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I think it's about that time. I know some people have done interviews already. If enough people have the guts to post their reviews early, we can help each other prepare, etc. Here's the format that's been used previously:

Program Name
1. Ease Of Communication:
2. Accommodation & Food:
3. Interview Day (Schedule, Type Of Interview, Unusual Questions, Experiences):
4. Program Overview:
5. Faculty Achievements & Involvement:
6. Location & Lifestyle:
7. Salary & Benefits:
8. Program Strengths:
9. Potential Weaknesses:

I'll be posting my first review this weekend. I hope I won't be the only one. :)
 

splik

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thank you for starting this thread. those of you who have posted on the WAMC and other threads and had better post your reviews otherwise I am cursing you to go unmatched. be it upon your heads.

it is completely unhelpful to post your reviews afterwards as programs can actually change a lot within a year and most people who claim they will never do. If you are worried that someone will retaliate for your post then you are posting inappropriate information (reviews should still be professional). And if you are too pathetic to post then good luck to you. It will be the start of a long career where people walk all over you and treat you poorly.
 
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notdeadyet

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God, double ditto to splik's post. SDN and its Interview Review threads were an awesome resource for me in choosing interviews at places I wouldn't have known much about otherwise. Back not too long ago, when people were more honest and open about their impressions. The "I'll post after I match" line is about as meaningful as the guy who says "I'll call you" over the shoulder after he leaves post-one night stand.

I said hi-hum things about the place I matched and four years later? Not a pitchfork to be seen. If you can't develop some spine now, don't pretend you will later. In the big picture, this is low stake. The idea that I'd be too scared to post that Acme University did a horrible presentation about their didactics but I'd somehow be the guy to stand up to their PD about hours violation reeks of fiction.
 
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clausewitz2

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University of Kentucky

1. Ease Of Communication: very responsive via email
2. Accommodation & Food: sprang for a reservation at a reasonable chain hotel. I did not stay overnight so I can't comment on the room, I am sure it was fine.
Resident dinner was at an exceptionally bland local chain restaurant, which is unfortunate because better options exist in town.
I requested a vegan lunch, was given a caprese sandwich. Not a huge deal, I could pick off the pieces of mozzarella, but frustrating to communicate the preference and have it ignored/misunderstood.
3. Interview Day (Schedule, Type Of Interview, Unusual Questions, Experiences): orientation, four half hour interviews, lunch with a handful of residentss (program only sprang for two extra box lunches, so attendance very sparse). Nothing very remarkable interview wise.

4. Program Overview: Small, 6 adult residents and a couple triple-boarders each year. Inpatient unit at a different site from main medical center which is again a different site from outpatient offices. Second block of neurology put off till second year. Totally random whether you will do medicine months on in-patient wards full of liver bombs or at an outpatient peds clinic.

Very much view themselves as a "non-research" department turning out clinicians.

Program director brand new this year.

5. Faculty Achievements & Involvement:
Chair is reasonably well known addictionologist. Only a couple of faculty have anything to do with inpatient or c/l work, so you will not work with most of them prior to third year.

6. Location & Lifestyle:
Lexington is a much more diverse place than it first appears. Yes, the dominant culture is bourbon, horses, and men's basketball, but a prolific craft beer and punk scene leavens the monoculture substantially. The city also has an openly gay mayor and is where every LGBTQ person in the region moves when they get a chance, so definitely a very blue place. Residents can totally afford houses.

Probably a majority of residents have or will soon have kids. Very family-friendly.

7. Salary & Benefits:
500 dollars yearly book money. No free parking or food, a major bone of contention.
8. Program Strengths:
Solid child program, addiction fellowship (very serious opioid problem in the region). Did telepsych before it was cool.

9. Potential Weaknesses:
Filled program last year chiefly by SOAP, although they seem eager not to repeat the experience. No other fellowships. You would have to fight to do research.
 
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bonedrone14

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Program Name-West Virginia University
1. Ease Of Communication: Email from the coordinator who is nice and helpful
2. Accommodation & Food: Put you up for the night prior to your interview in the Residence Inn literally across the parking lot from the hospital. I couldn’t make the dinner the night before due to travel. Everyone seemed like they enjoyed it though.
3. Interview Day (Schedule, Type Of Interview, Unusual Questions, Experiences): Starts either at 9:30 or 12 and consists of 4 interviews and lunch. All were low key and pretty conversational. No one was standoffish or awkward.
4. Program Overview: Pretty standard as far as inpatient years ½ and then outpatient third year. 4th year is 7 month electives I think. Apparently they’re pretty heavy on substance abuse/addictions and are doing some real novel stuff with suboxone and addiction therapy. Everything (inpatient units, outpatient clinics) is in one building which is separated from the medical hospital by a little road. The exceptions are apparently you spend one month at both the state hospital and the VA which are about an hour away. No one seemed to mind and said they get reimbursed for gas. For inpatient, they have one general adult, one ICU/geri unit, and one dual dx unit for adults, then they have a sex offender unit for adolescent males and a general child unit. All are about 10-12 beds from what the resident told me. We didn’t tour the units so I’m not sure what shape they’re in. No mention of research from what I can remember, but I didn’t ask either.
5. Faculty Achievements & Involvement: All that I met were friendly. Their addictions people apparently just went to Scotland to present their method of treating opioid addiction.
6. Location & Lifestyle: Morgantown is a pretty small town but has a Kroger, Walmart, target, chic fil a, and most things at least that I was looking for. I’ve got a small family so I think it would be fine for me, for someone single it may be less of what you’re looking for. The West Virginia mountains are beautiful and it’s definitely a place I could get used to seeing every day. The first year I interviewed with said that you work hard first year, especially on consults. I didn’t specifically ask about call because on the website it lists 1 short call a week and two weekend shifts a month for first years.
7. Salary & Benefits: Pretty standard. Of note, residents get macbook airs.
8. Program Strengths:
-Seems to be pretty strong on addictions.
-The new chair is big into neurobiology.
-It’s nice how everything is in one building, making for less commuting time.
-Hospital shares the parking lot with the football stadium, so there’s always the opportunity to tailgate if you’re into that.
-Beautiful area, especially if you’re into outdoorsy type stuff
9. Potential Weaknesses:
-Didn’t seem to be super into research if that’s your thing
-From what I gathered just interacting with the few residents I did, the 4’s seemed to be close but the 1’s didn’t seem to be as close
 

earl of lemon

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University of Colorado-Denver

1. Ease Of Communication:
-Very responsive, would always respond in around an hour if it was during business hours.

2. Accommodation & Food:
-From what I heard from the other applicants (I flew in on a red-eye just for the day): There are tons of hotels available downtown, the drive to the main campus (Anschutz Campus which is in Aurora) is around 20 mins so make sure you leave with enough time.
-The airport is a 25+ min drive away from the campus where you interview so if you fly in the same day make sure you give yourself some extra time.
-Dinner for both interview days (interviews are on Thursday and Friday) is Thursday night, I wasn't able to go to the dinner but from what I've heard a lot of the residents go to it (for the free food mostly)
-Lunch was chosen from a large menu with tons of different choices of sandwiches and salads from a sandwich store that's on the campus.
-Snacks are provided throughout the day (coffee, rice krispie treats, oreos, breakfast bars, bananas etc.)

3. Interview Day (Schedule, Type Of Interview, Unusual Questions, Experiences):
-Day starts at 8:30am on the Anschutz Campus. Parking is right across from the building where you have to go and it's only $5 so that was really nice.
-Associate Program Director Dr. Fenton starts off with a 30 minute presentation about the program and city with a small Q&A after.
-Between 8:30-12pm you have three interviews. One with the PD Dr. Davies, one with a faculty member (they'll match you to a member based on your interests) and then one with a PGY4.
-Dr. Davies: The previous PD (who everyone seemed to dislike and where some of the "malignant" status of this program originates) is gone and Dr. Davies, the previous associate PD, is the brand new PD starting this year. From what I saw during my interview and from what I heard from residents, he's amazing. He's attentive to resident needs and is always there to help when anyone in the program needs it. The interview with him was like talking to an old friend you've seen for the first time in years, it was easy and enjoyable.
-Dr. Heru: The current head of psychosomatic medicine at Denver. A small Scottish woman who is quick to tell you some great C/L stories and is quite frank with her questioning. She did have a clinic starting 15 minutes after we were supposed to start our interview so while it was short, she seemed to really enjoy both her job and the program.
-Resident interview: PGY4 who seemed to be really happy with the choice he made to go to Denver. He did say that the main downside of the program previously was the old PD and that since she's now gone the program as a whole will probably be better off. Super friendly guy who was frank with his answers and really seemed to want what was best for the program.
-The morning interviews are followed by lunch for an hour with a half-dozen residents. You then travel to the Denver Health Medical Center campus where you have an interview with another faculty member and finish the day off with a tour of the facility.
-PM interview with Dr. Rylander: One of the many associate PD's that Dr. Davies brought on after his rise to power. She was the one person who I found hard to read. She was very friendly but her questioning and answers to my questions were brisk and she seemed to be rushed throughout the interview. No surprises in terms of questions. By far the shortest interview of the day at the astounding 10-15 mins.

4. Program Overview:
-Training is split between: University of Colorado Hospital, Children's Hospital Colorado, VA MC, Denver Health MC and CeDAR (Center for Dependency, Addiction and Rehab). VA MC was originally supposed to be done this year however since it's gone so far over budget the completion date is up in the air right now. I have to say based on what they showed us it will be an amazing center once it's done.
-PGY1: Split into 3-month periods with half of your time being spent on psychiatry (2 3-month periods) and the other half being spent on med/neuro teams(2 3-month periods). 1 month of night float at Denver health during one of your psychiatry periods. Weekly outpatient clinics during both of your psychiatry rotations. 5 hour didactics every week. During medicine rotations will regularly work 60-70 hours a week.
-PGY2: 2-4 months of C/L at one of the hospitals, 1 month of night float at the VA, 3-5 months of inpatient psych and 2-4 months of electives of your choice (C/L, addictions, child/adolescent, forensics). Didactics still going strong at 5 hours a week.
-PGY3: Outpatient year with focus on psychotherapy and exposure to more electives. You do get your own dedicated office.
-PGY4: Even more elective opportunities. Since there are so many hospitals that the program is involved with there's an opportunity to apply for chief-resident at each of them, so it seems most are chief if they want to be.
-On-call schedule: PGY1: has 2-3 calls per month during psych rotations with 1 month night float, and you average 1 weeks of nights per 4 weeks on medicine rotations. PGY2: you average 1-2 calls/month with 1 month night float. PGY3: you average 1 call obligation/month with no overnights or in-house calls. PGY4: you supervise PGY1s on a buddy system with an additional average of 1 call obligation/month.
Child/adolescent: If you decide you love child/adolescent psychiatry and you can't get enough of research you can enter the "integrated track" during PGY1 where you can do research your entire residency and have a 5th and 6th year for funded research. If you just like kids and not research you can choose the "child interest track" and gain even more experience in it.
Career track: If you apply and enter this program you can take a year off following PGY3 and work at Denver Health where you get paid an attending's salary. Well technically you get paid half of an attending's salary during your year off and the other half is spread out amongst PGY2-PGY4.

5. Faculty Achievements & Involvement:
-Department chair is the editor-in-chief of AJP and from what I've heard is a super friendly and involved person.
-Faculty in just about every type of research you'd ever want to be involved in.

6. Location & Lifestyle:
-It's Denver so it's pretty amazing. You have an amazing view of mountains with skiing only a short drive away. Really if you're interested in any outdoor activities, this is the city for you.
-The food scene, the most important thing for me, seems to be up-and-coming with the large influx of people the city has seen recently. If you're looking for a city with microbreweries galore (yes please) this city is for you. Living downtown will put you within walking distance of at least 10 breweries, so you'll never go thirsty.
-The cost-of-living is a bit higher than what you might find in other cities of the similar size, but that's offset by the slightly higher salary the program gives you.

7. Salary & Benefits:
-PGY1: 52.8K PGY2: 54.8K PGY3: 56.9K PGY4: 59.3K
-Medical benefits are through the university system which seems to work out pretty well from what I've heard and was told that it was around $43 for a family/month
-Paid paternity and maternity leave of up to 8-12 weeks.
-21 days of paid vacation a year
-PGY2 and above get 7 paid days off for conferences
-Book stipend of $500 (if I remember correctly) with core textbooks provided

8. Program Strengths:
-Amazing city, amazing new PD and amazing new VA hospital, hopefully, in the next few years.
-Tons of research opportunities if that's what you're into.
-Strong child and adolescent program with a beautiful children's hospital.
-Typical psych cases are severe and acute, which is a plus for me but might be a downside for someone else.

9. Potential Weaknesses:
-Cost-of-living is a bit high
-Burnout during intern year due to intensity of the schedule

Overall: I didn't get the feel at all this program was malignant in any way. If what I've heard is true, the previous stigma it held was mostly due to the old PD. With the city, amazing PD and competitive benefits I was pleasantly surprised by this program and it's currently one of my top 3.
 
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technopoly

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University of Washington- Idaho Track
1. Ease Of Communication: Very responsive coordinators both in Seattle and in Boise.
2. Accommodation & Food: Didn't stay in the hotel recommended, which is right across the street from Goldy's, the restaurant where you breakfast with the Chiefs on the morning of the interview. That said, I did visit a few local places both during and after my interview and, being from a "foodie" city, was pleasantly surprised by the range of good food available in Boise. Way to go, Idaho!
3. Interview Day (Schedule, Type Of Interview, Unusual Questions, Experiences): The day consists of four interviews; two 45 minut interviews with faculty in the morning before lunch, and two interviews in the afternoon of the same length with the program director and one of the Chief Residents. Two interviews take place on the VA campus and the other two are at BSU, but the coordinator provides transportation by car between locations. In terms of the interviews, I was blown away by how friendly everyone is and how enjoyable the interviews were; I had a fairly philosophical conversation about variations in suboxone treatment programs with one of the faculty. It is clear that everyone there enjoys what they are doing and enjoys the program, and that came across very strongly in the interviews.
4. Program Overview: In this program, you spend the first two years in Seattle among their class of about 15 ( correct me if I'm wrong?) residents and then diverge in third year by traveling to Boise for the rest of your training. Required outpatient experiences third year include VA and BSU health center experiences with longitudinal patients at both. Also required are experiences at family medicine practices as a consulting physician. For anyone interested in community psychiatry, I thought this was an EXTREMELY valuable aspect of their training there, as you get experience teaching family medicine residents about psychotropics and consult with them on their patients. This is, as far as I can tell, a very unique aspect of their program. There are also a good number of electives in Telepsychiatry with rural Idaho clinics, women's health, substance abuse, sleep medicine, the local correctional facility, and child psychiatry experiences at a local hospital. One of the strengths of this program is that, as it is fairly young (8 years), there seems to be a lot of room to create your own electives 4th year, which I find a big plus. In terms of the move from Seattle to Boise, they also help you financially.
5. Faculty Achievements & Involvement: About half of the faculty are new attendings within the past 1-3 years and coming from their own program, Duke, and Mayo. There is a really nice diversity of experiences among the faculty and they all seem very enthusiastic about teaching. I was really struck by the familial atmosphere when we met as a group with residents and faculty at lunchtime. This seems like a wonderful environment to learn in.
6. Location & Lifestyle: Boise, Idaho is a city of about 200k people. It's surrounded by the Sawtooth mountains. There are a lot of streets with protected bike lanes and is a pretty easy city to navigate. It was beautiful! Everyone kept apologizing because the air was smoky- I guess there have been a lot of brushfires in the area recently, but I didn't think this detracted from the frank physical beauty of this city.
7. Salary & Benefits: To be honest, I can't remember numbers about this, but you get a nice stipend for educational and technology each year as well as financial provision for traveling to conferences at which you present. Uptodate/Medscape/etc memberships are paid for. 3k for moving expenses from Seattle to Boise 3rd year and paid travel fare for any trips made back to Seattle where residents need to be present with the rest of UW's class.
8. Program Strengths: Amazing experiences in community psychiatry. Very involved and friendly faculty. Small, familial class of residents who all seem to be very caring and supportive of one another.
9. Potential Weaknesses: Research is not a strong emphasis if this is your thing. And- depending on your perspective- moving from Seattle to Boise could be considered a relative weakness in terms of uprooting your life in the middle of residency. On the other hand, I think experiencing two different mental health systems during training and the diversity of patients between Seattle and Idaho would be a big plus in terms of broadening your patient skillset.
 

notdeadyet

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Wow, awesome reviews, folks...


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

MacDonaldTriad

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Don't worry Clausewitz, they will get cancelations. Just be ready to move fast if they call. I'm thinking of a new category called "We just got a last minute cancelation, you can have their slot if you can get here next Tuesday."
 
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clausewitz2

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Don't worry Clausewitz, they will get cancelations. Just be ready to move fast if they call. I'm thinking of a new category called "We just got a last minute cancelation, you can have their slot if you can get her next Tuesday."

Good thing I have one of those credit cards with triple points for plane tickets, eh?
 

SartoriousMeansTailor

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Program Name - UH Case Western
1. Ease Of Communication: Good - very responsive via email, but some information about the interview day seemed to sort of trickle in more than most...it was all there when I needed it though.
2. Accommodation & Food: Recommended list of hotels, which I can't vouch for. I AirBNB-ed it. Residents hosted dinner the night prior at a hybrid bowling alley/gastropub. It was a really laid-back fun evening and gave you a taste of what the program was about.
3. Interview Day (Schedule, Type Of Interview, Unusual Questions, Experiences): Attended Grand Rounds at 8am. Introduction by the PD from 9-10, and the department chair stopped in for about 20 minutes of that. Gave an excellent overview of the program. 4x30min interviews with faculty in your areas of interest and senior residents. Interviews were pretty laid-back and more about getting to know you and giving you an opportunity to learn about the program. No unusual questions or awkward pauses... Then lunch with residents and a tour of the main hospital complex.
4. Program Overview: Academic setting at a major university hospital, more of an emphasis on clinical psychiatry as opposed to research, I think...but there ARE plenty of research opportunities if that's your thing. What stands out to me most is that the program seems very flexible and open to you exploring your interests - and they have every fellowship program out there, so your electives are taught by experts in the field. Call is pretty reasonable (6wks night float in PGY-1 (broken up into 2-wk chunks) and maybe q8d in PGY-2) and seems to be very well thought out. The program also seems very DO-friendly, which I personally appreciate.
5. Faculty Achievements & Involvement: Faculty is very approachable and seem to really love to teach. There's a lot of independence in this program early on (so if you're a hands-on learner, that's great), but there's always excellent supervision so all of the residents seemed to feel very supported throughout. Lots of the faculty were trained by the residency program so there seems to be consistency among attendings about how they approach teaching, the role of residents on a service, etc.
6. Location & Lifestyle: Cleveland - so if snow is not your thing, that may be a problem. Cost-of-living is low, so all of the residents described a very comfortable lifestyle where they could do the things they enjoyed and had the time and resources to do so.
7. Salary & Benefits: PGY 1: $52,600; PGY 2: $54,400; PGY 3: $56,150; PGY 4: $58,500; 4 weeks vacation plus sick days
8. Program Strengths: Flexible curriculum with elective time in the 2nd year, plenty of opportunity to teach, tons of fellowships to choose from, a very collegial culture, fantastic PD and department chair, residents seem really happy here and they appear to be a tight-knit bunch, reasonable call schedule.
9. Potential Weaknesses: I love it and hope to match here, so I'm not exactly impartial. Possibly the weather?
 
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splik

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Overall: I didn't get the feel at all this program was malignant in any way. If what I've heard is true, the previous stigma it held was mostly due to the old PD. With the city, amazing PD and competitive benefits I was pleasantly surprised by this program and it's currently one of my top 3.
Yes my understanding is that the old PD was the problem so hopefully UC Denver will be on the up! They definitely have some great things going for them and some great faculty. Also colorado has the highest suicide rate of any state so presumably lots of business
 

splik

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University of Washington- Idaho Track
8. Program Strengths: Amazing experiences in community psychiatry. Very involved and friendly faculty. Small, familial class of residents who all seem to be very caring and supportive of one another.
9. Potential Weaknesses: Research is not a strong emphasis if this is your thing. And- depending on your perspective- moving from Seattle to Boise could be considered a relative weakness in terms of uprooting your life in the middle of residency. On the other hand, I think experiencing two different mental health systems during training and the diversity of patients between Seattle and Idaho would be a big plus in terms of broadening your patient skillset.
This is called the "Advanced Clinician Track" so definitely not good for anyone interested in research. However of note, residents can take "research elective" time to work on scholarly projects including educational projects, curriculum development etc.

Also there are now 16 PGY-1s as they've expanded the Idaho track and take 4 residents per year. There are 19 PGY-2s as there are typically 3 incoming PGY-2s who transfer from other specialties or programs.
 

splik

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Program Name - UH Case Western
8. Program Strengths: Flexible curriculum with elective time in the 2nd year, plenty of opportunity to teach, tons of fellowships to choose from, a very collegial culture, fantastic PD and department chair, residents seem really happy here and they appear to be a tight-knit bunch, reasonable call schedule.
9. Potential Weaknesses: I love it and hope to match here, so I'm not exactly impartial. Possibly the weather?
oh and not to mention arguably the best forensics program in the country with Phil Resnick. It has decimated in recent years and they've lost a lot of forensic psychiatrists who've moved to Oregon in recent years but it is still the place to go for forensics if you can cope with Cleveland. Anyone considering forensics, I would highly recommend going to a residency program in a hospital with a forensics fellowships. Places with forensics fellowship often have better forensics exposure during residency. Also forensics is a little competitive particularly at certain programs (though still only pulse needed to get a fellowship overall) and they often prefer internal candidates so it does help to go somewhere that has a good forensics fellowship.
 
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technopoly

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Also there are now 16 PGY-1s as they've expanded the Idaho track and take 4 residents per year. There are 19 PGY-2s as there are typically 3 incoming PGY-2s who transfer from other specialties or programs.

Is the number of PGY-1s going to change with the addition of UW's research track? My understanding based on an email from ERAS was that there was a new research track as of this year in the program in Seattle.
 

splik

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Is the number of PGY-1s going to change with the addition of UW's research track? My understanding based on an email from ERAS was that there was a new research track as of this year in the program in Seattle.

Historically there have been 2 research track spots (without a separate match number) and now there will be 4. They wont expand the number of seattle tracks spots beyond the current 12. However if the research track doesn't fill through the match then they will automatically convert into regular seattle track spots in the match. im not sure how that even works haha
 

SartoriousMeansTailor

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Program Name - Henry Ford Hospital/Wayne State University Program
1. Ease Of Communication: The program coordinator is amazing. Seriously. Everything was very organized and well-planned and you didn't ever worry about getting lost or having to carry random things with you as you tour a hospital.
2. Accommodation & Food: The program will provide a hotel the night prior, free of charge, that offers shuttle service to/from the interview site. It does not include transportation to/from the airport, FYI. There is also plenty of parking at the interview location if you prefer to drive. Eat the free cookie at the hotel - Yum! There is no dinner planned the night before. Breakfast is provided at your hotel and they have a catered lunch with residents on the interview day.
3. Interview Day (Schedule, Type Of Interview, Unusual Questions, Experiences): The morning starts out with a program overview by the PD. Then you have 5 thirty-minute interviews as individuals, followed by a 30-minute meeting as a group with the department chair. I found the interviews to be highly-variable, depending on the interviewer. Some were very laid-back, friendly, and conversational. Some were more formal and it was difficult to engage the interviewer. One was quite confrontational - so much so that I thought maybe they were doing a "stress" interview on purpose to see how I reacted...but perhaps I'm just being paranoid about that. The meeting with the department chair was very warm and friendly and then the rest of the day was very relaxed with a very informal lunch with the residents and a tour of the main hospital. You don't get to tour the Psych hospital, which is not close by and not accessible by shuttle. This made the tour a little less valuable since you primarily ended up seeing the sites you do your medicine rotations at as a PGY-1 and where you do consults.
4. Program Overview: Henry Ford is a very large hospital system in a very diverse city. They pride themselves on seeing a wide range of patients with diverse pathology. The hospital system itself has a strong focus on Quality Improvement, and this is an emphasis for the psych residency as well. Research is required. There are multiple tracks (ECT, Psychotherapy, Medical Leadership) that you can follow and the PD works with each resident individually to ensure they're able to focus on their interests while still meeting program requirements. The program emphasizes that 100% of residents pass their boards and 100% get into one of their top choices for fellowship. Training is done at multiple sites around the Detroit Metro area, but according to residents I spoke to these sites are all easily accessible. There's time for 1 month of elective in PGY-1/2.
5. Faculty Achievements & Involvement: Henry Ford is very well regarded in the area and takes on very complex cases, so you'll get to see a ton of interesting pathology.
6. Location & Lifestyle: I personally like Detroit. I think it's a city that is poised to make a comeback and offers truly excellent pathology for a psych resident to learn from. The residents all seemed very happy here and most seem to live in a variety of surrounding suburbs, based on their personal preferences.
7. Salary & Benefits: PGY-1 $51,500; PGY- 2 $53,500; PGY-3 $55,500; PGY-4 $57,500; 4 weeks PTO
8. Program Strengths: Very well regarded in the region; amazing board pass rates/fellowship placements points to being very well trained; the multiple training sites let you see a variety of pathologies, SES, etc; residents seem happy and many of the faculty were former residents who returned there to teach, so that speaks volumes; Detroit?
9. Potential Weaknesses: Lack of in-house fellowship opportunities (although there was some talk of creating fellowships in the near future); corporate culture (although this might be a strength from other folks' perspectives...culture is a highly personal thing anyway); Detroit?
 

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University of Kentucky

1. Ease Of Communication: very responsive via email
2. Accommodation & Food: sprang for a reservation at a reasonable chain hotel. I did not stay overnight so I can't comment on the room, I am sure it was fine.
Resident dinner was at an exceptionally bland local chain restaurant, which is unfortunate because better options exist in town.
I requested a vegan lunch, was given a caprese sandwich. Not a huge deal, I could pick off the pieces of mozzarella, but frustrating to communicate the preference and have it ignored/misunderstood.
3. Interview Day (Schedule, Type Of Interview, Unusual Questions, Experiences): orientation, four half hour interviews, lunch with a handful of residentss (program only sprang for two extra box lunches, so attendance very sparse). Nothing very remarkable interview wise.

4. Program Overview: Small, 6 adult residents and a couple triple-boarders each year. Inpatient unit at a different site from main medical center which is again a different site from outpatient offices. Second block of neurology put off till second year. Totally random whether you will do medicine months on in-patient wards full of liver bombs or at an outpatient peds clinic.

Very much view themselves as a "non-research" department turning out clinicians.

Program director brand new this year.

5. Faculty Achievements & Involvement:
Chair is reasonably well known addictionologist. Only a couple of faculty have anything to do with inpatient or c/l work, so you will not work with most of them prior to third year.

6. Location & Lifestyle:
Lexington is a much more diverse place than it first appears. Yes, the dominant culture is bourbon, horses, and men's basketball, but a prolific craft beer and punk scene leavens the monoculture substantially. The city also has an openly gay mayor and is where every LGBTQ person in the region moves when they get a chance, so definitely a very blue place. Residents can totally afford houses.

Probably a majority of residents have or will soon have kids. Very family-friendly.

7. Salary & Benefits:
500 dollars yearly book money. No free parking or food, a major bone of contention.
8. Program Strengths:
Solid child program, addiction fellowship (very serious opioid problem in the region). Did telepsych before it was cool.

9. Potential Weaknesses:
Filled program last year chiefly by SOAP, although they seem eager not to repeat the experience. No other fellowships. You would have to fight to do research.

If I were a PD and someone requested a vegan/gluten free lunch, that would make me hesitate to rank them. Who needs 4 years of "that guy/gal".
 
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splik

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Program Name - Henry Ford Hospital/Wayne State University Program
8. Program Strengths: Very well regarded in the region; amazing board pass rates/fellowship placements points to being very well trained; the multiple training sites let you see a variety of pathologies, SES, etc; residents seem happy and many of the faculty were former residents who returned there to teach, so that speaks volumes; Detroit?
9. Potential Weaknesses: Lack of in-house fellowship opportunities (although there was some talk of creating fellowships in the near future); corporate culture (although this might be a strength from other folks' perspectives...culture is a highly personal thing anyway); Detroit?
the PD Deepak Prabhakar is a super nice guy who is very invested in education and I think would be a wonderful mentor. He became PD straight out of residency/fellowship! It takes a special kind of someone to actually want to do the job. I think he would also be a strength. I don't know anything else about the program though!
 
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WingedOx

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the PD Deepak Prabhakar is a super nice guy who is very invested in education and I think would be a wonderful mentor. He became PD straight out of residency/fellowship! It takes a special kind of someone to actually want to do the job. I think he would also be a strength. I don't know anything else about the program though!

I've heard positive things about the place from my "connections" in Michigan. Doesn't sound like a place where you can go wrong.
 

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If I were a PD and someone requested a vegan/gluten free lunch, that would make me hesitate to rank them. Who needs 4 years of "that guy/gal".

While I find crusading vegans as annoying as the next person, I can promise you that my dietary preferences only come up when someone asks me directly about them.

Also, peanut butter sandwich + potato chips = vegan lunch solved. A truly minor issue.

Edit: or, you, know, just " not sure we can accommodate that" would have been fine, I can make my own provisions as an adult. My annoyance stemmed from "oh sure that's no problem HAVE SOME CHEESE".
 
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splik

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If I were a PD and someone requested a vegan/gluten free lunch, that would make me hesitate to rank them. Who needs 4 years of "that guy/gal".
or alternatively who wants to go to a place that can't organize a vegan option for a recruitment lunch? or worse doesn't know what vegan means?
 
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chicagochildpsych

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If you are a vegan or have religious restrictions on food, I would avoid Kentucky, or anywhere south of the mason Dixon.
 

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Good thing I have one of those credit cards with triple points for plane tickets, eh?

I just got my churning card in the mail today. Picked up a Chase Sapphire Preferred for the 40k bonus point offer. The card looks so good with it being made of metal that it is going to be hard to cancel when I am finished.
 

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If you are a vegan or have religious restrictions on food, I would avoid Kentucky, or anywhere south of the mason Dixon.

This is a statement of ignorant prejudice, and I mean that in the strict sense of reflecting a complete lack of relevant knowledge. The only way you could have made this statement sincerely is by having virtually no experience if the South. Lexington, for example, has multiple mosques and vegan communes. And it is relatively small for a Southern city!

Are you going to find a lot of options or different kinds of people in a town in the rural Missippi Delta? Probably not. But to think that anything South of the M-D line is a cultural wasteland is one of these delusions some people up north seem to enjoy indulging in. I grew up inculcated in this attitude, and I can tell you it is utterly false.

Or do you think that New Yorkers are correct when they confidently assert that life is basically not worth living outside New York and that Chicago isn't a real city?
 
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Program Name - Wayne State University/Detroit Medical Center
1. Ease Of Communication: Program coordinator was quick and responsive. Very easy to schedule and I was given directions on where and when to arrive.
2. Accommodation & Food: The program provides a dinner the night before hosted by two PGY2 residents. There was free parking at the interview site.
3. Interview Day (Schedule, Type Of Interview, Unusual Questions, Experiences): There was an organized itinerary given to us the morning of. The first 30 minutes were with the PD going over some basics of the program such as call schedule, curriculum, and training sites. Then each of us (5 applicants) went into separate rooms where we stayed the entire duration of the 5 30 minute interviews. Interviewed by the PD, APD, two 4th year residents, and a psychiatrist professor. No challenging questions were asked. They were for the most part laid-back and casual. We had a tour of the VA hospital afterward, I would have liked to tour the Sinai-Grace as well.
4. Program Overview: DMC emphasizes how supportive and friendly their PD is. They take pride in how they encounter a large variety of complex pathologies being in detroit. They have multiple training sites and seem to spend a lot of their training in DMC-Sinai Grace and VA hospital. A lot of opportunities to take I think 4-5 months of electives in 4th year?
5. Faculty Achievements & Involvement: Their PD Dr. Balon has been there for over 20 years. Residents love how involved he is with making sure residents are having their interests catered to. APD is working on a new curriculum to incorporate telepsych and family medicine in the 4th year.
6. Location & Lifestyle: The residents seemed happy and not overworked. They talk about how much they like Detroit and that they feel safe in downtown despite the stigma. They have social events including movie nights and soccer that the PD will attend frequently as well. They stressed that you feel like you're working with friends instead of colleagues and that the program is organized.
7. Salary & Benefits: 46-51k PGY1-PGY4 with yearly 2.8k educational stipend used at your own discretion.
8. Program Strengths: PD, multiple training sites, located in an area with a lot of very sick patients "straight out of The Walking Dead". They told me that after training there, you'll be equipped to treat everything possible. Fellowship opportunities available.
9. Potential Weaknesses: There is a lot of driving between each of the sites. Some of them are located about 45 minutes away from the main hospitals, but residents say you only rotate at those for a couple of months total. Location has poor stigma and Michigan can get pretty cold in the winter. Call is all in-house.
 

chicagochildpsych

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This is a statement of ignorant prejudice, and I mean that in the strict sense of reflecting a complete lack of relevant knowledge. The only way you could have made this statement sincerely is by having virtually no experience if the South. Lexington, for example, has multiple mosques and vegan communes. And it is relatively small for a Southern city!

Are you going to find a lot of options or different kinds of people in a town in the rural Missippi Delta? Probably not. But to think that anything South of the M-D line is a cultural wasteland is one of these delusions some people up north seem to enjoy indulging in. I grew up inculcated in this attitude, and I can tell you it is utterly false.

Or do you think that New Yorkers are correct when they confidently assert that life is basically not worth living outside New York and that Chicago isn't a real city?

Having lived in Louisiana and Texas for 8 years of my life, I might know a thing or two about the south. So "virtually no experience" might be an understatement. Being a man of color married to a southern Caucasian woman, I may have a different view of the cultural mores of the south than most. The cold hard truth is that while you may find a few exceptions, the vast majority of those in the south are proud of their culture of religious, social, and racial exclusion. I'm in Chicago now because I don't want to endure it anymore. Btw, we could probably arrange a vegan lunch at my hospital.
 
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Having lived in Louisiana and Texas for 8 years of my life, I might know a thing or two about the south. So "virtually no experience" might be an understatement. Being a man of color married to a southern Caucasian woman, I may have a different view of the cultural mores of the south than most. The cold hard truth is that while you may find a few exceptions, the vast majority of those in the south are proud of their culture of religious, social, and racial exclusion. I'm in Chicago now because I don't want to endure it anymore. Btw, we could probably arrange a vegan lunch at my hospital.

The issue of racism is one place where I definitely agree with you that the South is hugely regressive compared to most of the United States. I totally get why you would want to escape that for a place where it is less pervasive and oppressive. That is definitely a good reason to go north of the M-D.

I do not know where you lived in LA or TX, but either it was some time ago or you were living in fairly rural places if you did not encounter much in the way of alternate lifestyles, religions, etc. Or simply didn't go looking for it, perhaps - I can see bouncing off the dominant Baptist/Presbyterian/Evangelical monoculture in some places and writing them off. My basic point is that where it comes to culture (food, arts, music, other ways of living) it is a region that is much richer these days than it usually gets credit for.

I admit I reacted stronger than was warranted in my previous post, I have become somewhat tetchy about people I used to know talking smack about a region they knew nothing about. Apologies for that.
 
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This is a statement of ignorant prejudice, and I mean that in the strict sense of reflecting a complete lack of relevant knowledge. The only way you could have made this statement sincerely is by having virtually no experience if the South. Lexington, for example, has multiple mosques and vegan communes. And it is relatively small for a Southern city!

Are you going to find a lot of options or different kinds of people in a town in the rural Missippi Delta? Probably not. But to think that anything South of the M-D line is a cultural wasteland is one of these delusions some people up north seem to enjoy indulging in. I grew up inculcated in this attitude, and I can tell you it is utterly false.

Or do you think that New Yorkers are correct when they confidently assert that life is basically not worth living outside New York and that Chicago isn't a real city?

Yeah, true, but, jeez, I've been a vegetarian (not vegan), non-religious person living in the Bible Belt and living in my lovely city on the west coast, and the latter is so much nicer. Vegetarian food really would be a rarity at events -- you'd go to dinners, and they'd have a freaking barbecue with no thought that there are a good number of people, including vegetarians, vegans and people with religious restrictions who can't eat that type of stuff. I had attendings who would suggests to patients that they go to church and pray. 20% of the MS1s at my medical school answered that they would refer LGBT people to therapy in one of my human behavior classes. I doubt thing have changed much in the 5 years since I left. I know lots of liberal people, LGBTQ people, etc who live in these places, but I'm not headed back there.
 
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clausewitz2

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Yeah, true, but, jeez, I've been a vegetarian (not vegan), non-religious person living in the Bible Belt and living in my lovely city on the west coast, and the latter is so much nicer. Vegetarian food really would be a rarity at events -- you'd go to dinners, and they'd have a freaking barbecue with no thought that there are a good number of people, including vegetarians, vegans and people with religious restrictions who can't eat that type of stuff. I had attendings who would suggests to patients that they go to church and pray. 20% of the MS1s at my medical school answered that they would refer LGBT people to therapy in one of my human behavior classes. I doubt thing have changed much in the 5 years since I left. I know lots of liberal people, LGBTQ people, etc who live in these places, but I'm not headed back there.

Not denying any of that. You know that your particular lovely city on the west coast is the one I happen to be pining for at present...
 

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Program Name - University of Rochester

1. Ease Of Communication: Very easy e-mail communication with coordinator, who was very nice. Everything very clearly laid out for us.

2. Accommodation & Food: Put you up for night prior to interview in a hotel by the airport, with shuttle service to and from the medical center on interview day. Resident dinner on the night before at a nice place. Lots of residents were at the dinner: two chiefs, two child fellows, one each from the other years. A very relaxed, friendly atmosphere. Lunch was standard deli sandwich catering. Again, many residents were at lunch and were happy to chat, answer questions, share experiences, etc.

3. Interview Day (Schedule, Type Of Interview, Unusual Questions, Experiences): Day begins at 7:45. Starts with an overview of the department from the Chair: very relaxed, informal. Gives info on the history of the department (“birthplace of biopsychosocial model”) and on their current values (the big one: making sure people have access to community care). Followed by overview powerpoint of the program and the city in general from the PD and Associate PD and then another informal presentation from the Vice Chair and Associate Chair. Q&A encouraged throughout. Four 30 minute interviews throughout the day: one with PD, one with Associate PD, one with a chief resident, and one with a faculty in your specific area of interest. Interviews were almost all of the “Tell me what you want to know about the program”-variety; very relaxed, enjoyable, friendly. PD says he sometimes asks people to talk about a case. No one really had any questions for me apart from wanting to know what I was looking for in a program. Not a day where they want you to sell yourself, but rather one where they want to see if you’d think you’d be a good fit. Lunch with residents after the first couple of interviews, then a tour, and then the last one or two interviews.

4. Program Overview: Academic setting at a university hospital. Emphasis on clinical psychiatry in the training. Almost all of the rotations in the first 2 year are on the medical center campus (or very close by), with more electives in the surrounding community later on. Out of your 4 primary care months as a PGY-1, you do two on the Behavioral Medical Surgical Unit, which is for med/surg patients with serious psych issues. 3 of the PGY-1 inpatient months are on the forensic floor at a state hospital, which residents say is a really interesting, educational experience. Call seems very humane: 4 shifts per month for PGY-1 and 2, 3 shifts per month for PGY-3, and 2 per month for PGY-4. No overnight call. Moonlighting encouraged and easily available (at the medical center’s CPEP): their material says starting in the second half of PGY-2, but a resident said that realistically you can’t start until PGY-3. The hospital has a big catchment area and is the major provider in the region, so there’s supposed to be a good variety in the patient population and they treat the full spectrum of psych issues. Fellowships in Child/Adolescent, Geriatric, and Forensic. No Psychosomatic fellowships yet, but supposedly it’s in the works.

5. Faculty Achievements & Involvement: The faculty I met all seemed very nice. Per residents, faculty are very supportive. The PD and the Department Chair both emphasized the importance they placed on making sure trainees have enough autonomy to learn and make their own decisions, but have support whenever they need it.

6. Location & Lifestyle: Rochester seems like a pretty nice city of its size and type. Lifestyle, in general, seems like a big selling point for this program. They seem to be very family friendly, and not just paying it lip service: many faculty and residents all had specific examples of how the program worked with people to accommodate residents with family obligations, commitments, etc. Seems like a very affordable, livable place to raise a family. Even residents who weren’t excited about moving to Rochester at first say that they’ve come to really like it.

7. Salary & Benefits: Mostly standard. Along with the city, the university offers a $9K incentive if you’re a first-time homeowner buying a house in one of the neighborhoods near the university.

8. Program Strengths: Strong on community psychiatry. Emphasis on the biopsychosocial model. Very family friendly, both in terms of the culture of the program itself and the livability of the city. Great work/life balance. Good support from faculty. Residents all seem very happy to be there. No one acted like they were performers in a Potemkin village. FWIW, the Chair seemed like he would be a really great boss.

9. Potential Weaknesses: Not really a weakness, but… No one really talked about neuroscience at all during the residency dinner or on the interview day itself. No one there seemed that excited about psychopharm either (PD: “What’s the best antidepressant? The one you can get your patient to take”.) This is probably partly just a matter of emphasis, although I think it reflects, not really a weakness, but a genuine sense of what this program puts a high value on (“how can we deliver psychiatric care to the people who need it the most”) over what it places a (maybe only slightly) lower value on (“what’s the specific neurological dysfunction going on in people who need psychiatric care the most”).

10. Overall impression: Very solid program where everyone is very happy. Good camaraderie among the residents, and residents have only positive things to say about the faculty. Sets a high bar in terms of lifestyle, life/work balance.
 

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In years past, someone stepped up and offered to post reviews from people who wanted to do it anonymously...any takers?
 

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Yeah, true, but, jeez, I've been a vegetarian (not vegan), non-religious person living in the Bible Belt and living in my lovely city on the west coast, and the latter is so much nicer. Vegetarian food really would be a rarity at events -- you'd go to dinners, and they'd have a freaking barbecue with no thought that there are a good number of people, including vegetarians, vegans and people with religious restrictions who can't eat that type of stuff. I had attendings who would suggests to patients that they go to church and pray. 20% of the MS1s at my medical school answered that they would refer LGBT people to therapy in one of my human behavior classes. I doubt thing have changed much in the 5 years since I left. I know lots of liberal people, LGBTQ people, etc who live in these places, but I'm not headed back there.

And on that note, Chicagoans love to pat themselves on the back for being wonderfully progressive...until you suggest that their kids go to integrated schools. Some variation of "I'm not racist, but.." is uttered at every neighborhood association meeting here. You'll never see someone waving a Confederate flag around here, but walk around in certain neighborhoods in a non-white skin color, and expect looks of suspicion.

*Please don't use this as an indictment of Chicago programs ;). I just think certain people should get off their high horse about other areas of the country.
 
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9. Potential Weaknesses: Not really a weakness, but… No one really talked about neuroscience at all during the residency dinner or on the interview day itself. No one there seemed that excited about psychopharm either (PD: “What’s the best antidepressant? The one you can get your patient to take”.) This is probably partly just a matter of emphasis, although I think it reflects, not really a weakness, but a genuine sense of what this program puts a high value on (“how can we deliver psychiatric care to the people who need it the most”) over what it places a (maybe only slightly) lower value on (“what’s the specific neurological dysfunction going on in people who need psychiatric care the most”).

Sounds reasonable to me. Better than overselling what we know about neuroscience, which so far is very little. The PD's statement about antidepressants is also pretty evidence based.
 
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I just think certain people should get off their high horse about other areas of the country.

Thanks for saying this. The broad brush that people paint with, on SDN and elsewhere, is just plain wrong.
 

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Having lived in Louisiana and Texas for 8 years of my life, I might know a thing or two about the south. So "virtually no experience" might be an understatement. Being a man of color married to a southern Caucasian woman, I may have a different view of the cultural mores of the south than most. The cold hard truth is that while you may find a few exceptions, the vast majority of those in the south are proud of their culture of religious, social, and racial exclusion. I'm in Chicago now because I don't want to endure it anymore. Btw, we could probably arrange a vegan lunch at my hospital.

Yup. Everyone in the south is basically a white Christian racist... Please... This has a lot more to do with rural/metropolitan than anything related to north/south. I can find you white christian racists in every state in this country. Frankly your posts are intellectually lazy and small.
 

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Yup. Everyone in the south is basically a white Christian racist... Please... This has a lot more to do with rural/metropolitan than anything related to north/south. I can find you white christian racists in every state in this country. Frankly your posts are intellectually lazy and small.

Thanks for the name calling, I'll take my high salary and nice lifestyle in a city I enjoy. Somehow I'll have to get over your criticism. Now I have decide whether I'll take the Benz or the Lexus to work in the am.
 

bd290

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Thanks for the name calling, I'll take my high salary and nice lifestyle in a city I enjoy. Somehow I'll have to get over your criticism. Now I have decide whether I'll take the Benz or the Lexus to work in the am.

You're the one acting like candidates should be dismissed for dietary preferences/needs, badmouthing millions of people in >half the country, and now flaunting how much money you make apparently.... You'll forgive me if I similarly dismiss you. Thanks for more evidence of my "there are fools everywhere" theory.

Edit: I also did not name-call you at all.
 
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Yes, I'm a fool, a double board certified member of the faculty at a top 5 residency. Settle down junior, pass step 2 cs before you sling insults at the grown ups.
 

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Yes, I'm a fool, a double board certified member of the faculty at a top 5 residency. Settle down junior, pass step 2 cs before you sling insults at the grown ups.

Calling yourself a grown-up? That's a joke based on your behavior in this thread. I'm not even going to touch the 4 other hilarious things in this post. We can only hope that you never become PD of your "top 5 residency."
 
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When I said I wanted to see more activity in the Interview Review thread, this isn't what I meant. Jesus Christ.
 
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Leo Aquarius

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We tend to try for a friendly atmosphere in this here parts... :=|:-):
 
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