1. The SDN iPhone App is back and free through November! Get it today and please post a review on the App Store!
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice

Interview Feedback: Visit Interview Feedback to view and submit interview information.

Interviewing Masterclass: Free masterclass on interviewing from SDN and Medical College of Georgia

And just when I thought I had it figured out...

Discussion in 'Pre-Veterinary' started by persephone1, Jul 31, 2006.

  1. persephone1

    persephone1 Junior Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2005
    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    So, today I took one of our horses to Auburn to see if we could sort out his headshaking. I am currently applying for medschool. I have to fill out secondaries, but have been really reluctant to do so. I haven't really been able to pin-point it, but I am definately intimidated. Today I rode (for the first time in a long time) and was around horses all day. I came home wanting to be an equine vet. Now I'm looking up websites and reading forums and generally flipping out because I am not sure what to do. Should I apply to vetschool as well? Does anyone else have similar experience with this decision?

    I have been thoroughly exposed to both human and equine medicine. I have several hundred (human) hospital volunteer hours, and I have been around/trained/competed horses since I was born (mom is a trainer).

    I wonder if someone could help me talk this one out. Any/all opinions are appreciated. :)
     
  2. Note: SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. persephone1

    persephone1 Junior Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2005
    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Oh, and just so I don't seem totally obnoxious, I've read several md/dvm posts (including the one on this page), but am really not satisfied with the discussion. The only real reason I see coming up is money. I do like the idea of "taking the money off the table" and "you only have one life, so you should do what you want" ideas. I am interested in discussing how the quality of life is different treating humans vs. animals. I personally feel a lot of pressure (not that I buckle under pressure) by treating humans. I mean you make one mistake, and you could kill someone's mother/father..you get the point. Yes, animals are very important to people, but I feel that that pressure is a little bit less there, and therefor, perhaps the quality of the doctor's life is a little higher. I am just speculating here. Secondly, there is an energy in animals which I find very refreshing. I think that horses especially are very noble animals, and working with them on a daily basis would be very fulfilling. Thirdly, I feel that vet students are much more down to earth/less pompus that md students, and I feel that I would enjoy my peers in vet school more that I would in med school. On the flip side, I think that dealing with people is rewarding. They do things like talk, and tell you what's wrong, and can thank you (not that I haven't seen a horse look grateful). There is the potential for a long-term relationship with patients etc. The flip side of the pressure is also the challenge to perform at a very high level in life, which I find to be rewarding.
     
  4. HorseyVet

    HorseyVet Senior Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2006
    Messages:
    399
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Other Health Professions Student
    If you do more searching you should be able to find several more, much more detailed threads about vet med vs. human med. Use the search function.

    Also, my two cents in general is that before you make any radical decisions or changes, you really should spend some hardcore shadowing time with a veterinarian....equine if that's what you're interested in. Riding horses and working on them medically are completely different worlds.

    If you were thinking of trying to apply to vet school right now while you tried to sort everything out...that might not be a possibility. Although a lot of the pre-reqs are the same for vet as human medical schools, there are several that are different, and they vary from school to school. Also there are "minimum" experience/shadowing hours....You might be able to get the minimum in before the application deadline (Oct 1st still I think)...but you're likely to not be able to get enough to make you competitive (in both the variety of experiences and sheer amount)....the caveat to that though is if your GRE and GPA is outstanding...and you met all the pre-reqs...you're going to get into a vet school somewhere your first try b/c there are enough that just care about numbers.

    Another note about the shadowing....the theoretical point of the schools making you do that is so that you apply and enter vet school with a *real* understanding of the profession and what will be expected of you. I think especially for a person in your position, before you drop everthing, I'd recommend that you explore several different shadowing experiences before making the commitment to vet med.
     
  5. persephone1

    persephone1 Junior Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2005
    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Thanks for your advice Horseyvet. I have spend quite a lot of time with vets. I worked at a small animal clinic for a summer, and having 7 horses, I've seen my fair share of routine and emergency vet visits. I have also been through pony club, during which you learn an amount of vet knowledge, but I totally understand what you mean when you say that vet stuff is different from just hanging out at the barn. I think that is what I have to work out for myself. Do I just want to ride and have horses, or do I want to work with them. I'd much rather spend the bulk of my day with horses than with people.
     
  6. birdvet2006

    birdvet2006 Glasgow c/o 2006
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2005
    Messages:
    418
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Veterinarian
    Well if you're an equine vet, you definitely have to spend a lot of time with people! The horsey people that come along with the horses can be quite demanding.

    How much do you like lameness and limb anatomy? Because that's the bulk of equine medicine (besides boring stuff like vaccines) - IMO.
     
  7. persephone1

    persephone1 Junior Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2005
    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Hehe, yes. I'd say that horse people are well, a different breed. I think that's part of the draw. There's something about people who like animals, and especially horses, which I like.
     
  8. lillytwig

    lillytwig Membership Revoked
    Removed

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2005
    Messages:
    147
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
    :thumbup:
     
  9. bubbles525

    bubbles525 Member
    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2006
    Messages:
    99
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
    I can only give you my personal perspective, and I have never considered human medicine. I have always KNOWN that this was what was right for me (I know typical). As I have gained more experience in life and in the profession I have developed lifestyle reasons and personal reasons. I don't like the politics of human medicine. My father ( a radiologist) was forced to move our whole family when I was 18 and my younger siblings were 16, 14, and 11. The non-comp clauses, the ridiculous law suits, the human doctor's I've met who are in it because of the money or because of the prestige. I have certainly met great docs too, but I don't want to have to search for them. I can't stand human suffering more than I can't stand animal suffering. Yes animal suffering makes me sick to my stomach, but there *is* a difference in both the experience form the outside and what a doctor can do to help. My mother just died (yesterday actually) of metastasis breast cancer, my aunt died of the same disease may 19th this year... You have no idea how much, when it was certain there was nothing we could do, and that they would never wake up from the coma that all I wanted was to take their suffering away. Human doctors cannot do that. Vet's can. In the end when there is nothing in my or anyone's power to help I want to be able to make that decision and stop the suffering. These last few months have proven to me that euthanasia is sometimes our greatest capacity and gift... Please don't get me wrong, Human euthanasia would never work, I know. Regulations consent, etc. As a Vet it is not an ethical dilemma. Every time I go to work, even on the bad days, it feels good to do what I do as a veterinary assistant. I go home tired, sore, sad, frustrated, and the next day I wake up and want to do it again. It is a very personal feeling. I love my coworkers; I like the vast majority of the relief vets who come into our practice. I like the flexibility that is possible for family life. I love that I can help both people and animals, and how grateful both can be. Sure there is the odd horrible owner, or nasty pet, but by and large if you chose your area and practice well you can find a community that you enjoy working in, easily. Whereas in human med sometimes your ability to find that community is decreased greatly by your specialty and the politics.
    I guess thatÂ’s all I can figure out right now. I don't know if any of that was what you were looking for. Good luck making your own decision.
    ~Marie


     
  10. ginkogirl

    ginkogirl Junior Member
    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 4, 2006
    Messages:
    65
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
    Marie,

    To start, I'm very sorry to hear about your mother. Your composure during this time is really something to be noted. I can only imagine that you are a very level-headed and mature person and will one day make a spectacular vet.

    Secondly, I couldn't agree more with your comments on this post. The fact that veterinarians have the power to alleviate untreatable suffering in a way that human medical doctors cannot is a powerful, although often forgotten, fact of vet med. On top of this, when you love your job's duties, your co-workers, and the flexibility, you know that you are entering (or hoping to enter, in my case) a truly special profession. Thanks for reminding me of precisely why I want to go into veterinary medicine.

    ~Lisa
     

Share This Page