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MCAT3xpert

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I am a very poor outfit selector. I needed help from many people to finally dress properly and match my clothes. I am confused about what shoes to wear in rotations. Should I wear comfortable running shoes with my dress shirt and pants? People say to wear something comfortable, but what about the professional side of the shoes. If it were up to me I would wear sweatpants, XL t shirt, and mismatched socks. However, I assume this is not what people mean when they say "pick a comfortable shoe that is right for you." Help
 

CLE216

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Usually business casual, at least that's what most people wear. For men that means dress pants (and belt) and button down shirt. In my experience, whether you wear a tie or not depends a lot on the rotation. Personally, most of mine didn't really require a tie, and I don't like wearing them so I didn't. Others might disagree on this. Older docs almost always wear ties. Millenial docs I find don't wear them as often. A good rule of thumb would be to wear one to the first day of the rotation and go from there.

In terms of shoes, I don't think running shoes would be appropriate, except for rotations where you will be wearing scrubs. Anytime you will be wearing business casual you should be wearing some kind of dress shoe.
 
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MCAT3xpert

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Usually business casual, at least that's what most people wear. For men that means dress pants (and belt) and button down shirt. In my experience, whether you wear a tie or not depends a lot on the rotation. Personally, most of mine didn't really require a tie, and I don't like wearing them so I didn't. Others might disagree on this. Older docs almost always wear ties. Millenial docs I find don't wear them as often. A good rule of thumb would be to wear one to the first day of the rotation and go from there.

In terms of shoes, I don't think running shoes would be appropriate, except for rotations where you will be wearing scrubs. Anytime you will be wearing business casual you should be wearing some kind of dress shoe.
thank you this really helped me! What if it is raining, should you get dress boots? or regular boots?
 

CLE216

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I personally would just wear dress shoes and use an umbrella, and avoid puddles lol
 
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JoaoMoutinho

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You can also buy rubber covers for your dress shoes and just take them off when you get inside. They aren't expensive, and they will do a lot to protect your leather dress shoes. They also work well to protect your shoes if you live in a snowy area, especially if there is a lot of salt on the sidewalks.
 
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WedgeDawg

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Assuming you're a dude (if you're a girl, I can't really help much, sorry!):

If you're not wearing scrubs, you should be wearing slacks/suit pants/khakis + button down long sleeve shirt +/- tie (depending on what the rotation wants) and professional footwear. This means not tennis shoes or sandals, nothing open toed, nothing athletic, preferably darker or muted colors.

If you're wearing scrubs, then wear scrubs + tennis shoes / comfortable closed toed shoes.
 
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mvenus929

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Assuming you're a dude (if you're a girl, I can't really help much, sorry!):

If you're not wearing scrubs, you should be wearing slacks/suit pants/khakis + button down long sleeve shirt +/- tie (depending on what the rotation wants) and professional footwear. This means not tennis shoes or sandals, nothing open toed, nothing athletic, preferably darker or muted colors.

If you're wearing scrubs, then wear scrubs + tennis shoes / comfortable closed toed shoes.

If you're a girl...

Wear dresses/skirts that are at least 2 inches above the knee or longer. Thick straps are okay, but you're better off wearing a cardigan or something with at least cap sleeves. No spaghetti straps without a cardigan.

Wear shoes that you are comfortable standing all day in, with closed toes. Meaning if your feet hurt after wearing heels for an hour, you shouldn't be wearing heels in the hospital. But they should be dress shoes unless you're wearing scrubs (then you can wear athletic shoes, or something like Danskos).

And for both genders, default to business casual unless otherwise told. You don't want to be the person that shows up in scrubs and gets sent home to change on the first day.
 
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nimbus

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46454639-4FBF-4B2C-A43B-9A2FF17F3E0E.jpeg


#hypebeast
#comfyshoes

All you need to know.
 
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MSTP18

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There are some styles of danskos and other clogs that can pass for dress shoes (e.g. Dansko Professional :: The Walking Company) if you really want something more comfortable for standing and walking. I wouldn't wear them to a residency interview but for the wards or clinic they are fine.
 

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Just want to add that if you're a guy on an inpatient service, you should err on the side of wearing a tie unless the attending AND some of the residents don't, IMO.
 
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Styrene

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General input: The strongest data I've seen shows that patients have strong preference for professional attire with white coat, especially inpatient settings.

For male medical students:

Internal medicine: Wear a tie, dress shirt, something more formal than jeans and jeans-style khaki pants, leather dress shoes, and white coat across all settings.

Pediatrics: Wear a dress shirt, tie, something nicer than jeans jeans-style khaki pants, and leather dress shoes. White coat not required and discouraged by many.

EM: Scrubs seem to be fine. You can even wear your own scrubs. You can wear a white coat over the scrubs for storage, but not required. Sneakers are fine. I formal attire, which was also fine.

Psychiatry: Formal attire as above, white coat not required. Your institution may have a policy regarding ties on inpatient and acute units...ask before the first day.

Surgery and related: Formal attire during rounds and all meetings, change into scrubs for OR and change back into formal attire as needed for later meetings/rounds/clinics.
 

ace_inhibitor111

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For shoes, get an Oxford style shoe that is not full leather, (which hurt like hell with prolonged walking). Calvin Klein makes some decent nylon ones that are pretty comfortable. You can also get away with random $50 faux-leather dress shoes from Macy’s.

Also, copy how the residents dress (unless they wear Patagonia). I personally prefer the shirt and tie with white coat but if everyone wears hospital brand scrubs do the same (no figs).
 
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ciestar

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For ladies:


Buy these. You’ll thank me later.
 

Chibucks15

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Dear god if you don’t know how to professionally dress you’re gonna be in a world of hurt. Don’t wear running shoes with dress clothes you’ll look like a dummie. Bring a change of shoes worst case and throw them in a backpack. I mean cmon
 
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radsisrad

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If you wear Danskos as a med student, you'll look like even more of a dork than the male residents who wear them.
 
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mistafab

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A classic go-to for men is to own a pair of black dress shoes and brown dress shoes. Make sure you own a black belt and brown belt. Then, if you can, buy a cheap brown watch and cheap black watch. I purchased the watches on amazon, total was around $30.

The difference that these make in combination is formidable. Alternate the colors (black vs brown) every day, and you have yourself a simple recipe for looking professional. Combine with slacks (avoid khaki color except on Friday), and a button up (long sleeve), and you are a league ahead of most students. It really is that simple.

Another trick for men, is to use the above and throw in the occasional sweater (solid color, wool or cotton) on top of your shirt. It can give a ‘friendly’ vibe while remaining very professional. You can throw in a tie for the first few days of every rotation, then stop wearing it if no one else uses it. Tie plus sweater combo is somehow very professional yet very friendly, you’ll see what I mean.

edit: also, if you want to “express yourself,“ you can always wear funky socks combined with your professional dress. I’ve seen lots of doctors across specialties do it. I don’t see the appeal, but I don’t knock them for doing it and I have never heard negative comments about it. Also, pins on your white coat, or loud lanyards (i.e. tie-dye simpsons lanyard) can also be used as convo-starters/expression pieces.
 
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LoGo

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The whole dress up thing is pretty stupid in hospital based medicine. It’s not like we go in to work expecting to sit at a mahogany desk on the 30th floor signing documents - we are in a dirty hospital walking 5 miles per day and could get vomit, blood, pus, piss or feces on your clothes/shoes at any moment. Even in clinic, if you do procedures my preference is scrubs.

This study (and many others like it) shows it’s the white coat that in fact is the important piece, and patients prefer scrubs on anyone doing any kind of procedure: https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/bmjopen/8/5/e021239.full.pdf

Anyways, as a med student I recommend dressing up still in business clothes. For shoes, get some soft leather loafers - they are way more comfortable to walk long distances in than leather sole lace ups.

As a resident just get some black Ultraboosts and wear scrubs whenever possible.
 
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aldol16

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It's different for different rotations and for different medical schools. West Coast schools tend to have a more lax attitude but still most require some sort of formal dress code. Usually that's business casual. Some inpatient rotations will allow you to wear scrubs. Others might require you to wear business casual even on inpatient medicine. For those that do, I highly recommend getting a pair of clogs that look semi-professional and wearing those. They'll keep your feet comfortable all day and when you're on surgery rotation, you'll learn to appreciate them.
 

slowthai

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Does anyone know of any comfortable and affordable dress shoes? I'd have to get a bilateral BAA after wearing my current ones for 10+ hours straight

Edit: Just saw what @ace_inhibitor111 wrote. Still open to any other suggestions!
 
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NickNaylor

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Does anyone know of any comfortable and affordable dress shoes? I'd have to get a bilateral BAA after wearing my current ones for 10+ hours straight

Edit: Just saw what @ace_inhibitor111 wrote. Still open to any other suggestions!

Think about getting some in-soles.
 
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PTPuser

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I actually used them for a bit, but it didn't help, lol.

The key is switch shoes after certain hours to off load different area of your feet. When I used to work 12-16 hrs shift, I would switch between merrell / dansko after 8 hrs. Made a complete difference!
 
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PTPuser

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Clarks have some really comfortable dress shows with ortholite insole in them for the dress shoes.
 
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libertyyne

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Does anyone know of any comfortable and affordable dress shoes? I'd have to get a bilateral BAA after wearing my current ones for 10+ hours straight

Edit: Just saw what @ace_inhibitor111 wrote. Still open to any other suggestions!
I wore dress shoes to my IM rotation, afterwards I had surgery and got myself a pair of these
1581468208238.png

I have continued to wear these under khaki's and shirt and tie. No one has ever brought that up, and i have continued to get great evals. I will wear dress shoes to super formal presentations now, but besides that these cloud foams or what ever they are called have been easy on my feet.
I religiously wear a button down and a tie with white coat when ever I cant wear scrubs. Has been working out fine.Most dress shoes that are built for comfort give me the look of a door to door sales man or missionary, and dont look great anyway.
 

slowthai

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Clarks have some really comfortable dress shows with ortholite insole in them for the dress shoes.

These look great, aren't too expensive and seem pretty comfortable! I'll update with my experience when I buy them.
 
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slowthai

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I wore dress shoes to my IM rotation, afterwards I had surgery and got myself a pair of these View attachment 295340
I have continued to wear these under khaki's and shirt and tie. No one has ever brought that up, and i have continued to get great evals. I will wear dress shoes to super formal presentations now, but besides that these cloud foams or what ever they are called have been easy on my feet.
I religiously wear a button down and a tie with white coat when ever I cant wear scrubs. Has been working out fine.Most dress shoes that are built for comfort give me the look of a door to door sales man or missionary, and dont look great anyway.

That is amazing. I really don't think I could skate by with doing this, lol. I'm glad it's worked out for you, though.
 
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Chibucks15

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Big fan of the new trend of leather dress shoe tops with gym shoe bottoms. Cole haan has some but so do many other brands. Throw and insole in those and stands for days. Plus they actually look like dress shoes
 
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ciestar

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Big fan of the new trend of leather dress shoe tops with gym shoe bottoms. Cole haan has some but so do many other brands. Throw and insole in those and stands for days. Plus they actually look like dress shoes
Sperry has them too!
 
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cj_cregg

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Hot tip: Macy's has a FREE personal stylist service (as do several other major department stores, though Macy's is the most affordable of the ones I know of). You schedule an appointment and fill out an online thing about what type of outfit you're looking for, your size, your style preferences, your budget, etc. You show up and they have 5 or 10 outfits lined up for you to try on, including shoes and accessories if you request. Saves a ton of time wandering aimlessly around the mall, not any more expensive than regular shopping, and is great if you're someone who struggles a bit with fashion sense.
 
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radsisrad

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Hot tip: Macy's has a FREE personal stylist service (as do several other major department stores, though Macy's is the most affordable of the ones I know of). You schedule an appointment and fill out an online thing about what type of outfit you're looking for, your size, your style preferences, your budget, etc. You show up and they have 5 or 10 outfits lined up for you to try on, including shoes and accessories if you request. Saves a ton of time wandering aimlessly around the mall, not any more expensive than regular shopping, and is great if you're someone who struggles a bit with fashion sense.

Serious Q: are med students really so clueless as to not know which brands/companies have the styles and fits they like by this point in their lives? I knew this stuff back in high school.
 

Chibucks15

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Serious Q: are med students really so clueless as to not know which brands/companies have the styles and fits they like by this point in their lives? I knew this stuff back in high school.
This is what I’m astonished by too. Have you never dressed formally before...Or even business casual? I mean dear god you’re at minimum 22 right? Just look presentable it ain’t that hard.

Residents I’ve worked with have told me about people coming to interviews in jeans and gym shoes, not showered, etc. and then proceed to hit on residents, their spouses, or nurses. And even brag about how they are gonna “bag so many nurses”. If that’s the bar that’s being set for med students I’m a damn honors student haha let’s get our **** together guys and gals cmon now time to grow up and be adults
 

libertyyne

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Serious Q: are med students really so clueless as to not know which brands/companies have the styles and fits they like by this point in their lives? I knew this stuff back in high school.
All fashion is transient and temporary. Pinstripe suits with shoulder pads were big in the 90s and not so much since then until recently. Plain khakis in brown or grey were big at some point and now more colored chinos or what ever.
I don't keep up with the stuff so I wouldn't be opposed to having an expert give my outfit a once over.
 
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ciestar

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Serious Q: are med students really so clueless as to not know which brands/companies have the styles and fits they like by this point in their lives? I knew this stuff back in high school.
Not all of us really knew about these things back in high school. Back then it was a matter of what I could afford and Walmart’s selection isn’t great.

Even now, I am still trying to find things I like and things that fit
 
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cj_cregg

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Serious Q: are med students really so clueless as to not know which brands/companies have the styles and fits they like by this point in their lives? I knew this stuff back in high school.
There are def people out there who are just less aware of this stuff. Also probably a different story for ladies than guys.

It is nice to get a little expert advice sometimes, although I think I dress myself fairly okay. But my main reason for using the service is I'm an intern and I'm too tired to go shopping lol
 

Matthew9Thirtyfive

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Hot tip: Macy's has a FREE personal stylist service (as do several other major department stores, though Macy's is the most affordable of the ones I know of). You schedule an appointment and fill out an online thing about what type of outfit you're looking for, your size, your style preferences, your budget, etc. You show up and they have 5 or 10 outfits lined up for you to try on, including shoes and accessories if you request. Saves a ton of time wandering aimlessly around the mall, not any more expensive than regular shopping, and is great if you're someone who struggles a bit with fashion sense.

This is why I joined the military. They tell me what to wear every day, and it’s usually the same thing as everyone else.
 

TelemarketingEnigma

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Serious Q: are med students really so clueless as to not know which brands/companies have the styles and fits they like by this point in their lives? I knew this stuff back in high school.

Bodies change, brands change, styles change, and different settings have different expectations. What was expected in my chill socal high school is definitely not the same as what's expected in formal medical settings. I know how to find clothes that I like and that fit, but I definitely wasn't buying suits or even business casual in high school, so I had to learn where to find appropriate pieces once I started needing them (which wasn't really until end of college/my gap years). There are also a lot of unspoken rules about professional dress that there's really no way to learn (especially if you didn't grow up around it) unless you ask.
 
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CherryRedDracul

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Serious Q: are med students really so clueless as to not know which brands/companies have the styles and fits they like by this point in their lives? I knew this stuff back in high school.

No offense to the OP, but there are bright med students who are utterly clueless about life outside of school.
 
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