supraeli

10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jul 16, 2008
56
0
0
Status
Dental Student
i cant wait for the kids attacking the OP to graduate dental school and try to pay off their loans with their hopes and dreams of helping the poor and needy. :laugh: you people make me laugh.

OP is being totally realistic. i remember reading a link to a thread that oracle posted once about starting dental salaries. it really REALLY depends on location, but i'd say around 75-100K makes sense.. armorshell would also probably know better than any of the PREdent kiddos on here.

adam: your responses in this thread have been well composed and completely understandable. don't let the silly people on this forum drive you away from your search for knowledge regarding this field. although my 2 cents is that you do truly need a love for dentistry to take on the physical, mental, and financial burden that the profession holds. you WILL live a comfortable life, but it will not be extravagant, if you are an average practicing dentist. some may make worse choices or better choices than others and thus stray from the average, but on average you will make it out just fine. good luck! :thumbup:
 

AmpedUp

The Legend Still Lives
7+ Year Member
Dec 1, 2009
657
6
151
Status
Dentist
i cant wait for the kids attacking the OP to graduate dental school and try to pay off their loans with their hopes and dreams of helping the poor and needy. :laugh: you people make me laugh.

OP is being totally realistic. i remember reading a link to a thread that oracle posted once about starting dental salaries. it really REALLY depends on location, but i'd say around 75-100K makes sense.. armorshell would also probably know better than any of the PREdent kiddos on here.

adam: your responses in this thread have been well composed and completely understandable. don't let the silly people on this forum drive you away from your search for knowledge regarding this field. although my 2 cents is that you do truly need a love for dentistry to take on the physical, mental, and financial burden that the profession holds. you WILL live a comfortable life, but it will not be extravagant, if you are an average practicing dentist. some may make worse choices or better choices than others and thus stray from the average, but on average you will make it out just fine. good luck! :thumbup:
Pretty much. I cannot argue with you, because you're a lot farther than I am.

Anyway, the cost of training/education is a non-negotiable issue. You've got to pay it regardless. However, I can definitely understand why dental students are frustrated about being overcharged, and I'll probably feel just as overwhelmed as anyone when I see the first bill.

I know some of us aren't realistic at times (I'm even guilty), but that's the whole point of experience. One thing I forgot to note about Adam is that he's older than most of us (I'm assuming from previous posts), so that's why I apologized in the end - and learned my lesson. In his circumstance, being concerned about the financial aspect of going into dentistry is a much more important issue to him than me - simply stated. But yeah, if his interests outweighs the financial aspect, go for it; if not, give it another (serious) look. Going with the gut might not be the best idea for him, unless there is little at stake...
 

uncbestyet

10+ Year Member
Aug 3, 2008
136
2
0
Chapel Hill
Status
Dental Student
FYI - from the ADA
What is a dentist's average net income?

The average net income for an independent private practitioner who owned all or part of his or her practice in 2007 was $205,960 for a general practitioner and $353,280 for a specialist.
Source: 2008 Survey of Dental Practice—Income from the Private Practice of Dentistry Item code: SDPI-2008/SDPI-2008D. Available as a free download to ADA members.



http://www.ada.org/1444.aspx
 
Feb 28, 2010
68
0
0
Status
Pre-Dental
FYI - from the ADA
What is a dentist's average net income?

The average net income for an independent private practitioner who owned all or part of his or her practice in 2007 was $205,960 for a general practitioner and $353,280 for a specialist.
Source: 2008 Survey of Dental Practice—Income from the Private Practice of Dentistry Item code: SDPI-2008/SDPI-2008D. Available as a free download to ADA members.



http://www.ada.org/1444.aspx

I believe you might have strayed from the argument, as the majority of the discussion has been for starting salary. Your numbers are correct but they are for an established dentist who owns his practice. None of us will be owning a practice out of DS and we certainly won't be established. The ADA's numbers though do shed light on the fact that if you survive and reach your goals you will certainly have a nice life (monetarily).

The concerns that some have raised though in terms of starting salary and school debt I would say is very fair. Considering undergrad and DS it is very easy to enter the work force with 300K even 400K in debt (that has been accruing interest). Considering I will be attending one of the most expensive schools I opted for the navy scholarship, understanding it is not for everyone, I am very happy about graduating zero debt, having money in the bank, and a competitive job.

Whether money is or is not the reason you chose dentistry, it is the way you live and I suggest everyone have a grasp of what their situation is.
 

hopefullyadent

Removed
May 6, 2010
137
0
0
Status
Pre-Dental
ive read the thread and the OP is just mature..other ppl aren't...destiny11, AmpedUp, and dentalWorks are probably the biggest idiot-s and most obnoxious ppl on sdn..and they are PURELY in it for the money (although they try to act like they are purely NOT in it for the money)
 

RSlex

5+ Year Member
Jun 13, 2010
27
0
91
Status
Pre-Dental
Dentists' salaries are now hit with the economy crisis.