Sep 12, 2017
23
2
Hey world,

I was wondering what a BSN program to med school would be like. The big question is what prerequisites would I have left after I complete my bachelors in nursing (BSN). Here is my plan:

• Take a year of basic courses in community college.
• Transfer about 30 credit hours over to Chamberlain University of Nursing.
• Do well in my BSN (3 years)
• Begin the rest of pre med...
but here's the problem. I don't know where to go after I finish my program. Do I go back to my local community college and finish the rest of the prerequisites or should I go through a certain program that is accredited and offers the rest of the prerequisites I need? Any insight and experience would be greatly appreciated.
Ps: I don't understand why Nurse to MD is very frowned upon. If anything it should be somewhat of an advantage when applying as nurses are very well rounded and are prepared for med school after such rigorous studying at such a short time. All of this considering a great GPA and MCAT I still don't know why people hate the fact of some nurses wanting to become doctors.
EDIT: I will also have a great résumé along with my GPA and MCAT by then. I would have experience in the ICU and as a CNA which is healthcare related. I am also thinking of doing research related to medicine to put on my résumé.
 
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Vertebrate

Current BSN Student Nurse
May 9, 2017
3
4
Status
Pre-Medical
I'm (sorta) in the same boat. There's tons of threads like this on SDN but I'll go ahead and give you my two cents:

In my opinion, doing your BSN before med school isn't a huge deal, as long as you are honest with yourself and you are doing it for the right reasons. If Nursing is your back up to a medical career then it makes some sense to me. Don't get a BSN thinking it translates better than any other Bachelors (because I've heard around the block it doesn't matter). Sure people will tell you that you should only focus on the primary goal (med school), but in reality you need to do what's best for you and your loved ones. Having a back up plan and enacting it now provides mental and financial stability that you might not have if you just went pre-med.
But again be honest with yourself: "Would I actually enjoy nursing?". It is a vastly different career compared to a medical career. I asked myself this a little too late. I enjoy nursing to a degree, yes, but the politics of nursing, lack of knowledge and autonomy drive me up the wall, which is why I'm committing myself to the process of becoming a physician. Can you work as a nurse if med school doesn't work out? For me I can, but not for the rest of my life. Even without med school I'll find my way up the ladder somewhere (NP, CRNA, Teaching nursing, etc.). I don't wanna stay on he medsurg floor forever.

A few tips from me personally if you decide to go the BSN to Physician route:
-Go over your BSN and Med School prereqs with a fine tooth comb. You'll need to take classes that apply to both. Do not take any "intro to" or "for healthcare professionals" or "fundamentals of" classes. These are typically reserved for pre-nursing students and while you are one, they won't do you any good. This is probably why many people seem to frown upon BSN to MD/DO, because these classes just screw everything up for you. I cannot emphasize this enough. Take the general, hard science requirements. I did this (thank God) and now I only have a few core pre-reqs left (o-chem and physics, probably biochem). These classes will also help you out in nursing school far more than any of the pre-nursing classes. Don't pigeon hole yourself.
-Don't listen to your pre-nursing advisor. If I had listened to him I would've ended up not doing the above and would've set myself back another 2 years. They are more than likely going to tell you what you are doing is senseless but don't listen to them. Be your OWN advisor. Do your own research when it comes to what classes you'll need.
-Make good grades
-If you get into nursing school, don't talk about your dreams of becoming a physician to ANYONE. I did this regrettably to a couple of peers and I've be ostracized (even by professors) ever since. RNs don't like to think as their field being just another stepping stone in your path. Who cares, you do you. Just don't give anyone a reason to dislike you.
-I'd also suggest going to a 4 year uni rather than a CC. Just by looking at Chamberlain's BSN curriculum, you'd only be taking courses that apply to BSN. You'd basically have to redo all of those classes. I'd strongly advise you not to attend Chamberlain and go to your 4 year state uni and do all of your pre-reqs that way.

I'm not in med school and I haven't even graduated from my BSN program (talk to me in about a year though) yet so take my advice with a grain of salt, but I've been in college for 4 years. I've seen enough pre-med students flail around scrambling for a plan B because they screwed their chances at med school, and I've seen enough pre-nursing students take useless pre-allied health courses that do nothing for them if they can't get into a BSN program. It's always good to have a backup plan, even is nursing is that plan.
 
Last edited:
OP
M
Sep 12, 2017
23
2
I'm (sorta) in the same boat. There's tons of threads like this on SDN but I'll go ahead and give you my two cents:

In my opinion, doing your BSN before med school isn't a huge deal, as long as you are honest with yourself and you are doing it for the right reasons. If Nursing is your back up to a medical career then it makes some sense to me. Don't get a BSN thinking it translates better than any other Bachelors (because I've heard around the block it doesn't matter). Sure people will tell you that you should only focus on the primary goal (med school), but in reality you need to do what's best for you and your loved ones. Having a back up plan and enacting it now provides mental and financial stability that you might not have if you just went pre-med.
But again be honest with yourself: "Would I actually enjoy nursing?". It is a vastly different career compared to a medical career. I asked myself this a little too late. I enjoy nursing to a degree, yes, but the politics of nursing, lack of knowledge and autonomy drive me up the wall, which is why I'm committing myself to the process of becoming a physician. Can you work as a nurse if med school doesn't work out? For me I can, but not for the rest of my life. Even without med school I'll find my way up the ladder somewhere (NP, CRNA, Teaching nursing, etc.). I don't wanna stay on he medsurg floor forever.

A few tips from me personally if you decide to go the BSN to Physician route:
-Go over your BSN and Med School prereqs with a fine tooth comb. You'll need to take classes that apply to both. Do not take any "intro to" or "for healthcare professionals" or "fundamentals of" classes. These are typically reserved for pre-nursing students and while you are one, they won't do you any good. This is probably why many people seem to frown upon BSN to MD/DO, because these classes just screw everything up for you. I cannot emphasize this enough. Take the general, hard science requirements. I did this (thank God) and now I only have a few core pre-reqs left (o-chem and physics, probably biochem). These classes will also help you out in nursing school far more than any of the pre-nursing classes. Don't pigeon hole yourself.
-Don't listen to your pre-nursing advisor. If I had listened to him I would've ended up not doing the above and would've set myself back another 2 years. They are more than likely going to tell you what you are doing is senseless but don't listen to them. Be your OWN advisor. Do your own research when it comes to what classes you'll need.
-Make good grades
-If you get into nursing school, don't talk about your dreams of becoming a physician to ANYONE. I did this regrettably to a couple of peers and I've be ostracized (even by professors) ever since. RNs don't like to think as their field being just another stepping stone in your path. Who cares, you do you. Just don't give anyone a reason to dislike you.
-I'd also suggest going to a 4 year uni rather than a CC. Just by looking at Chamberlain's BSN curriculum, you'd only be taking courses that apply to BSN. You'd basically have to redo all of those classes. I'd strongly advise you not to attend Chamberlain and go to your 4 year state uni and do all of your pre-reqs that way.

I'm not in med school and I haven't even graduated from my BSN program (talk to me in about a year though) yet so take my advice with a grain of salt, but I've been in college for 4 years. I've seen enough pre-med students flail around scrambling for a plan B because they screwed their chances at med school, and I've seen enough pre-nursing students take useless pre-allied health courses that do nothing for them if they can't get into a BSN program. It's always good to have a backup plan, even is nursing is that plan.
Thanks for the healthy advice. So you don't suggest me going to community college after high school then transferring to a 4 year state university? Or did you mean after the program I should go to a 4 year university but I'll have to take all my classes over? Sorry, I'm confused on this and if you have time to reply I'd appreciate it if you do.
 
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Vertebrate

Current BSN Student Nurse
May 9, 2017
3
4
Status
Pre-Medical
Thanks for the healthy advice. So you don't suggest me going to community college after high school then transferring to a 4 year state university? Or did you mean after the program I should go to a 4 year university but I'll have to take all my classes over? Sorry, I'm confused on this and if you have time to reply I'd appreciate it if you do.
Since you are still in high school, I'd either:
-Go straight into a pre-med path at a 4 year university. The traditional route isn't bad, as long as you are confident you can ace those classes and make yourself stand out from the rest of the pre-meds you'll be cometing against for med school slots.
-If you go the BSN route then yes, avoid community college or "accelerated BSN programs" at all costs. They don't offer much flexibility if you want to switch from nursing to something else down the road.

It's not that you won't have to take ALL of your classes over again, but a significant number of them will not count for medical school pre-reqs, which will force you to essentially start from the beginning if you want to apply to med school. this defeats the purpose of doing a BSN before med school, if you ask me.
Going to community college then transferring to a 4 year college isn't a bad idea, just do it for basic freshman level courses (like english, algebra,etc). Take the rest of your sophomore and upper level coursework at a 4 year college.
 
OP
M
Sep 12, 2017
23
2
Since you are still in high school, I'd either:
-Go straight into a pre-med path at a 4 year university. The traditional route isn't bad, as long as you are confident you can ace those classes and make yourself stand out from the rest of the pre-meds you'll be cometing against for med school slots.
-If you go the BSN route then yes, avoid community college or "accelerated BSN programs" at all costs. They don't offer much flexibility if you want to switch from nursing to something else down the road.

It's not that you won't have to take ALL of your classes over again, but a significant number of them will not count for medical school pre-reqs, which will force you to essentially start from the beginning if you want to apply to med school. this defeats the purpose of doing a BSN before med school, if you ask me.
Going to community college then transferring to a 4 year college isn't a bad idea, just do it for basic freshman level courses (like english, algebra,etc). Take the rest of your sophomore and upper level coursework at a 4 year college.
Ok gotcha! I was misunderstood but yes I understand now. Thank you! Bless!
 
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Cryc_to_the_point

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If your goal is to be a physician, don't obtain a BSN as a stepping stone. Go straight for medical school with whatever interests you hold. If however, you mean you would like to work for a few years and "keep your options open," by all means obtain your BSN and do the medical school prerequisites.
 

Blanky

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I understand why you got this idea but its not a good one. You are in high school and not linked already to nursing, you also don't plan on being nurse. "Health-profession" degrees have much lower acceptance rates into medical schools. Nursing programs are also known to be extremely grade deflating or diploma mills and expensive. I think the best advice is to pick a major you enjoy while sprinkling in the pre reqs and do well in them.
 
OP
M
Sep 12, 2017
23
2
I understand why you got this idea but its not a good one. You are in high school and not linked already to nursing, you also don't plan on being nurse. "Health-profession" degrees have much lower acceptance rates into medical schools. Nursing programs are also known to be extremely grade deflating or diploma mills and expensive. I think the best advice is to pick a major you enjoy while sprinkling in the pre reqs and do well in them.
Yea I actually enjoy nursing and have already been studying medsurge lol. It's just that if I don't choose nursing path then there are risks of not getting admitted to med school and not having a back up marketable degree. Also there are many that excel in nursing as they are passionate so grade deflating and what not is all stereotypical to the real world.
 

Blanky

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Many programs have 1 year BSN degrees for people who already have a bach. Also some programs transfer into NP or you could go PA with a normal bach.
 

njtrimed

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Sep 13, 2014
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Many programs have 1 year BSN degrees for people who already have a bach. Also some programs transfer into NP or you could go PA with a normal bach.
This is a much better route if medicine doesn't work out. First of all, medical schools won't consider nursing science courses rigorous, and they won't fulfill any of your prerequisites. Another issue is that nursing is a competitive field and a professional degree, and it's arguably pretty unethical to take a coveted seat in a program that you are only using as a stepping stone/backup plan. We are facing a critical nursing shortage, and we desperately need to be training more nurses. It's one thing for a practicing nurse to choose to go to medical school, but another entirely for someone to plan to pursue a nursing degree with no real intention of practicing nursing. There are probably a dozen reasons that your current plan is not a good one. On the other hand, if you plan accordingly, you can fulfill all the prerequisites for med school, PA school, and BSN to RN programs and leave all your options wide open.
 
Jul 29, 2017
3
3
Status
Pre-Medical
Since you are still in high school, I'd either:
If you go the BSN route then yes, avoid community college or "accelerated BSN programs" at all costs. They don't offer much flexibility if you want to switch from nursing to something else down the road.
Curious as to why not "accelerated BSN programs", is it just because of the rigidity or have you heard negative outcomes? I went that path and really had a great experience, we had a 97% NCLEX pass rate which is among the highest in the country and got a great job right out of school. Hoping that it isn't looked at as a negative thing so I'm just wondering if that's all there is to the comment.

That being said for your situation OP, I would definitely suggest going to a 4-year school. You could take pre-reqs along with your curriculum so that you don't have to waste 2+ years after graduating with a BSN to take the MCAT. I'm a local guy and Chamberlain and CSCC aren't going to prepare you for the MCAT the way a 4-year school would. Also, getting a job in the ICU right after graduation is far from a given, this happens very rarely to new grads. Also, from what I understand, research is a MUST, not something that will make you stand out unless you have published your work.

I don't think this is necessarily a bad path but it's going to be much longer than it needs to be if you just went the traditional path and performed well as a pre-med. Not to mention, nursing school is a bitch, very rigorous, tons of clinical hours outside of the classroom and the professors are notoriously difficult for no reason. "Nurses eat their young" is a common phrase you'll hear a lot.
 
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OP
M
Sep 12, 2017
23
2
This is a much better route if medicine doesn't work out. First of all, medical schools won't consider nursing science courses rigorous, and they won't fulfill any of your prerequisites. Another issue is that nursing is a competitive field and a professional degree, and it's arguably pretty unethical to take a coveted seat in a program that you are only using as a stepping stone/backup plan. We are facing a critical nursing shortage, and we desperately need to be training more nurses. It's one thing for a practicing nurse to choose to go to medical school, but another entirely for someone to plan to pursue a nursing degree with no real intention of practicing nursing. There are probably a dozen reasons that your current plan is not a good one. On the other hand, if you plan accordingly, you can fulfill all the prerequisites for med school, PA school, and BSN to RN programs and leave all your options wide open.
Yes, I understand. I didn't know they offer 1 year BSN programs to those with a bachelors. Now that I know, I would be saving years of time. I will just transfer to a 4 year from community because I don't want to risk doing bad in a 4 year. I don't see why I would take that risk when community is often a slightly easier experience for many reasons. So long as I know what universities take CC transferred credits, I'll be just fine. Wow, thanks for the info guys! Really appreciate your sincerity and all the best!
 
OP
M
Sep 12, 2017
23
2
Curious as to why not "accelerated BSN programs", is it just because of the rigidity or have you heard negative outcomes? I went that path and really had a great experience, we had a 97% NCLEX pass rate which is among the highest in the country and got a great job right out of school. Hoping that it isn't looked at as a negative thing so I'm just wondering if that's all there is to the comment.

That being said for your situation OP, I would definitely suggest going to a 4-year school. You could take pre-reqs along with your curriculum so that you don't have to waste 2+ years after graduating with a BSN to take the MCAT. I'm a local guy and Chamberlain and CSCC aren't going to prepare you for the MCAT the way a 4-year school would. Also, getting a job in the ICU right after graduation is far from a given, this happens very rarely to new grads. Also, from what I understand, research is a MUST, not something that will make you stand out unless you have published your work.

I don't think this is necessarily a bad path but it's going to be much longer than it needs to be if you just went the traditional path and performed well as a pre-med. Not to mention, nursing school is a bitch, very rigorous, tons of clinical hours outside of the classroom and the professors are notoriously difficult for no reason. "Nurses eat their young" is a common phrase you'll hear a lot.
Yes so true I've heard that a lot as well. BSN programs are for those who already know they want to be nurses. I want to be a physician so I might as well go the best way I can. Also from what I've seen, research is actually quite optional. All you really need is an MCAT, GPA, and prerequisites finished to apply. Getting medical research and having your name on it can actually separate you from your peers. Just having a high GPA and MCAT can already ruin your chances especially without any research experience and EC's. I've seen a lot of docs even my dad's friends that have started out at community to save time, money, or because they weren't ready for university yet and they've become successful docs. It's all preference in the beginning. You also learn the EXACT same things you learn at a 4 year from a CC (talking about basic prerequisites for undergraduates of course). CC's are also becoming a little tough on students because of this stigma people put on CC's. Just because someone made school their life in high school doesn't mean they are smarter nor ready for university. Seen to many people drop out of university at Christmas. I wouldn't take that risk rather I would get great grades in CC and transfer to a great university. Like Blanky said above ^, I should major in what I like but also obtain the prerequisites for med school at a university and all is fine as long as one plans to excel of course which is what most, if not, all students plan to do in university.
 
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le Gud

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Aug 9, 2013
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Hey OP!
My post will be long, but I will try to be as thorough an concise as possible. First of all, I am a RN who is having a pretty successful application cycle: 1 DO acceptance and 3 MD interviews. I went to CC for my nursing degree simply because I didn't have financial resource to attend a 4 year college. Do I enjoy my nursing experience/career? Hell yes, but I know it's not something that I can do for the rest of my life. As a matter of fact, my experience and realization as a RN tremendously play in my acceptance into DO school.

Would I go to nursing school if I had the opportunity to go to a 4 year college straight? Absolutely not! Medical school is such a competitive process where every single thing which sets you apart helps. Yes, research is a big thing nowadays. Also, TA work or all other type of extracurricular activities: SGA, sorority, volunteer work... In nursing school you won't have much time to do those because it's time consuming and GPA destroyer to some degree. You are young, shoot for the star, if you don't get it at least you will be in the space. That being said, commit to a strong science program: biology, neuro-biology, biochemistry, physics, chemistry....

There are other options out there if you don't make it to medical school such as accelerated BSN, PA and CAA. Talking of CAA, Certified Anesthesiologist Assistant, which is the equivalent of CRNA, you don't need to be a nurse . A bachelor in science with the same prerequisites as medical school will give you access to this master program. Here is a link for the different programs in the country: FAQs

You are still a high schooler, so you can speed up the process by taking early college. This will cut down the basic courses needed. Once in a four year college, you can focus on upper level biology courses and research.

I don't agree with those who believe that nurses are look down during admission process. I believe, good GPA and MCAT scores are what make the difference. I went to CC and got my associate in nursing. Worked for a year and went back for a Bachelor in Health Science, which allowed my to take all the upper level biology courses of my choice. Yes, I have taken all the kind of **** which helped me tremendously on the MCAT. I believe Biochem, Advance Biochemistry, Genetic, Molecular/Cellular biology helped me big time. Managed to make a 506 on the MCAT. It's not terrible, but I am proud of it since it got me somewhere.

Bottom line of all these: work hard, plan smart, don't rely on advisors (they are sales people) and have faith in your dream and career goal. Good luck young brother/sister. May the Almighty be your strength: this is a long and difficult journey.
 
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OP
M
Sep 12, 2017
23
2
Hey OP!
My post will be long, but I will try to be as thorough an concise as possible. First of all, I am a RN who is having a pretty successful application cycle: 1 DO acceptance and 3 MD interviews. I went to CC for my nursing degree simply because I didn't have financial resource to attend a 4 year college. Do I enjoy my nursing experience/career? Hell yes, but I know it's not something that I can do for the rest of my life. As a matter of fact, my experience and realization as a RN tremendously play in my acceptance into DO school.

Would I go to nursing school if I had the opportunity to go to a 4 year college straight? Absolutely not! Medical school is such a competitive process where every single thing which sets you apart helps. Yes, research is a big thing nowadays. Also, TA work or all other type of extracurricular activities: SGA, sorority, volunteer work... In nursing school you won't have much time to do those because it's time consuming and GPA destroyer to some degree. You are young, shoot for the star, if you don't get it at least you will be in the space. That being said, commit to a strong science program: biology, neuro-biology, biochemistry, physics, chemistry....

There are other options out there if you don't make it to medical school such as accelerated BSN, PA and CAA. Talking of CAA, Certified Anesthesiologist Assistant, which is the equivalent of CRNA, you don't need to be a nurse . A bachelor in science with the same prerequisites as medical school will give you access to this master program. Here is a link for the different programs in the country: FAQs

You are still a high schooler, so you can speed up the process by taking early college. This will cut down the basic courses needed. Once in a four year college, you can focus on upper level biology courses and research.

I don't agree with those who believe that nurses are look down during admission process. I believe, good GPA and MCAT scores are what make the difference. I went to CC and got my associate in nursing. Worked for a year and went back for a Bachelor in Health Science, which allowed my to take all the upper level biology courses of my choice. Yes, I have taken all the kind of **** which helped me tremendously on the MCAT. I believe Biochem, Advance Biochemistry, Genetic, Molecular/Cellular biology helped me big time. Managed to make a 506 on the MCAT. It's not terrible, but I am proud of it since it got me somewhere.

Bottom line of all these: work hard, plan smart, don't rely on advisors (they are sales people) and have faith in your dream and career goal. Good luck young brother/sister. May the Almighty be your strength: this is a long and difficult journey.
Amazing story my friend! Not many people like you out there. Yes, my parents want me to start out at a community college then transfer out to a uni. Many great doctors have started out at a community college. Hope to be in your position one day and thanks for the great advice!
 

Blanky

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I feel like CC is what you make out of it. I recently switched to University from CC and I had an overall enjoyable experience. I do not find the classes any more difficult (possibly biochem although that is the "weeder" at my school and the only person who teaches it is tough) although I am enjoying the amenities. If you go in with a great work ethic, pre-read chapters and the powerpoints etc etc I think it makes all the difference. And for the record I am strongly against the idea of going to Nursing school with the end goal of medical school in mind.
 
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I feel like CC is what you make out of it. I recently switched to University from CC and I had an overall enjoyable experience. I do not find the classes any more difficult (possibly biochem although that is the "weeder" at my school and the only person who teaches it is tough) although I am enjoying the amenities. If you go in with a great work ethic, pre-read chapters and the powerpoints etc etc I think it makes all the difference. And for the record I am strongly against the idea of going to Nursing school with the end goal of medical school in mind.
Correct, I've changed the perspectives about Nursing school to med school. It turns out it is a waste of time especially if one's main goal is to become a physician. Community college seems great from what I here. Close to home, affordable, smaller classes, 1 on 1 with your professor. It can really benefit my GPA to start at a CC then transfer to a university. I know your GPA is wiped after you transfer but it's not harder or easier then CC because you learn the same things. Thanks for the reply anyways and good luck!
 

Blanky

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Your talking about GPA wipe when you transfer. That is only in the eyes of the University, for medical school all GPAs are factored the same.
 

Noisewater-TDX

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BSN here, currently an OMS1.

The BSN does little to nothing to prepare you for the biochem stuff in the first year. But you will be good when you get to the clinical years lol.
 
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popopopop

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BSN here, currently an OMS1.

The BSN does little to nothing to prepare you for the biochem stuff in the first year. But you will be good when you get to the clinical years lol.
It helped me out when it came to some of the metabolism stuff and when we had clinical-based lectures like diabetes/obesity.

Also, we have classes in preparation for the PE in year 1 and assessment classes, so I'm doing well in that since I can take a BP and do a patient interview.
 
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Noisewater-TDX

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It helped me out when it came to some of the metabolism stuff and when we had clinical-based lectures like diabetes/obesity.

Also, we have classes in preparation for the PE in year 1 and assessment classes, so I'm doing well in that since I can take a BP and do a patient interview.
Yeah the clinically relevant stuff, like BP, lung and heart sounds, and stuff. I'm good with.



I didnt remember alot of the metabolic stuff.
 
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