trash55

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So, if someone graduates with a Pharm.D, and becomes a licensed pharmacist, can they call them selves "Dr. Smith, Jones (or to use a movie reference that I'm sure many of you will recognize) Green, Black, Pink..."?

Can they put PhD after their signature, or is it not the same thing? :cool:
 

rycetrix

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So, if someone graduates with a Pharm.D, and becomes a licensed pharmacist, can they call them selves "Dr. Smith, Jones (or to use a movie reference that I'm sure many of you will recognize) Green, Black, Pink..."?

Can they put PhD after their signature, or is it not the same thing? :cool:
If someone graduates with a PharmD., they are considered a doctor. The PharmD. is an abbreviated version for Doctor of Pharmacy. PharmD.'s cannot put PhD after their signatures because a PhD is a different type of abbrevation for a doctor. PhD stands for Doctor of Philosophy of (insert subject here). You can have a PhD in Chemistry and be considered a Doctor.
 

mike36

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Please use search function...this topic has been discussed several times before. PharmDs are typically only called "Dr" in academic settings, not in practice.
 

Pharmdapp87

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Please use search function...this topic has been discussed several times before. PharmDs are typically only called "Dr" in academic settings, not in practice.
The sad part about that is that I know physicians who refuse to recognize them as doctors. Like others have said, technically, PharmD graduates have earned the right to be called doctors, but many don't believe this is a fair system simply because the amount of schooling and the connection with doctors=physicians. The assumption is automatically that anyone with the term doctor is referred to as a practicing physician. We all know this assumtion is untrue, seeing as we call most of our professors Dr. So and So. Don't you love sociology?

Oh, the second thing to remember is, PhD programs are usually (99.999999%... Idk if there are any exceptions, minus the joint degrees) obtained after attending a graduate school of whatever field available. Pharmacy school is in no way a graduate program. It's a totally different experience and education system, not to mention you HAVE to have a B.S degree and graduate students (usually PhD students) will be your TA's for a select number of your classes during your curriculum. I urge you students to take this into account, simply because it makes you seem kind of stupid if you express so much passion for pharmacy and can't even differentiate between a professional school and a graduate school. it irritates actual graduate students, makes some adcoms question you as a potential pharmacy student, and it kinda irks me to be honest. Anyway, hope everyone is hearing good news :thumbup::woot::thumbup:

Good luck:D
 

confettiflyer

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yeah this topic has been beaten to death, use the search function. I even think there's an automatic search function when you make a thread. guess we can't cure myopia anymore.

but yes, you can call yourself dr.

just don't be the a-hole that insists people do, or else you're no better than the a-hole physician that openly insists everyone does.
 

ffpickle

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I would have preferred they called the degree PD (Pharmacy Doctorate) or DP (Doctorate in Pharmacy).

It may seem trivial but it's more in line with MD, DO, JD, PhD, DPT, ScD, MBA, MHA, etc. Shorter just sounds more professional for some reason.
 

confettiflyer

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hahah, if you do initials and your name is laura anar or something, your initials will be L.A., P.D.

I can think of a few people that don't like it. I kind of like PharmD. It's descriptive. If you told people you had a PD, PmD, or other...you'd have to explain that it's pharmacy. Sometimes when I see DNP I have to think that it's for nursing and not some random government agency.
 

Pharmdapp87

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hahah, if you do initials and your name is laura anar or something, your initials will be L.A., P.D.

I can think of a few people that don't like it. I kind of like PharmD. It's descriptive. If you told people you had a PD, PmD, or other...you'd have to explain that it's pharmacy. Sometimes when I see DNP I have to think that it's for nursing and not some random government agency.
Haha, agreed
 

alenadoma

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hahah, if you do initials and your name is laura anar or something, your initials will be L.A., P.D.

I can think of a few people that don't like it. I kind of like PharmD. It's descriptive. If you told people you had a PD, PmD, or other...you'd have to explain that it's pharmacy. Sometimes when I see DNP I have to think that it's for nursing and not some random government agency.
lol...LAPD..clever
 

civex

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lol, makes me think of the first day of calculus. Professor says, " I don't have my doctorate,so you can't call me doctor, but if you'd like you can call me master."
 
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trash55

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Please use search function...this topic has been discussed several times before. PharmDs are typically only called "Dr" in academic settings, not in practice.
Chill out! No one MADE you read the thread!! Nothing came up on the precious search that answered the question. And if I made a mistake in searching (because yes I'm new to this whole "discussion forum" thing) than I'm so sorry that I wasted your precious time asking a question that has allready been asked before...poor, poor baby!!

Reminds me of why I was so hesitant to participate in discussion forums!
 

confettiflyer

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Chill out! No one MADE you read the thread!! Nothing came up on the precious search that answered the question. And if I made a mistake in searching (because yes I'm new to this whole "discussion forum" thing) than I'm so sorry that I wasted your precious time asking a question that has allready been asked before...poor, poor baby!!

Reminds me of why I was so hesitant to participate in discussion forums!
lol, wasted paragraph
 

meso

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yes, you could call yourself Doctor. I've heard a few interviewers with a PharmD refer to themselves as doctors, and even authors with a PharmD mentioned as Dr. so and so. As another poster stated, usually you have to be in the academic field for this to be seen as legitament.

The rest of the public consider the term "doctor" commonly for physicians and PhDs. Plus, you might appear a little egotistical when you try to get others to call you "doctor". :)
 

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Technically you are a doctor, but do you really need to be called that?

I think it's cooler to humbly refrain from calling yourself Dr. blahdidah and insisting people to call you that.

Dr. Kirbypuff
 

ernievdb

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When I'm finished I will make a couple people call me Doctor.....my brother and sister :laugh:
 

TrjTraddie

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Technically you are a doctor, but do you really need to be called that?

I think it's cooler to humbly refrain from calling yourself Dr. blahdidah and insisting people to call you that.

Dr. Kirbypuff
I agree 110%.

I'll go even further and say that pharmacists who insist on calling themselves "Dr...." probably have a sense of inferiority and wish they went to Medical School. I've never seen a retail pharmacist calling him or herself Dr.

BTW... Yall should read "The Angry Pharmacist".. he has a pretty interesting take on Dr. Pharmacists, PharmD. http://www.theangrypharmacist.com/archives/2007/11/pharmacists_are.html
 

vinny808

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Because my chem, bio, phychology professors all wish they went to Med school too because they are all called Dr.______?
 

SHC1984

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I agree 110%.

I'll go even further and say that pharmacists who insist on calling themselves "Dr...." probably have a sense of inferiority and wish they went to Medical School. I've never seen a retail pharmacist calling him or herself Dr.

BTW... Yall should read "The Angry Pharmacist".. he has a pretty interesting take on Dr. Pharmacists, PharmD. http://www.theangrypharmacist.com/archives/2007/11/pharmacists_are.html

I agree! I once had a chemistry professor that got offended b/c I called her Ms. instead of Dr....I think people that get offended b/c of something like this are just insecure and pissed off that they didn't go to medical school instead. If you want the Dr. title so badly then go to med school! :rolleyes:

I personally prefer to be called Ms. Dr. makes me sound like an old man! I prefer being YOUNG. :laugh:
 

TrjTraddie

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I agree! I once had a chemistry professor that got offended b/c I called her Ms. instead of Dr....I think people that get offended b/c of something like this are just insecure and pissed off that they didn't go to medical school instead. If you want the Dr. title so badly then go to med school! :rolleyes:

I personally prefer to be called Ms. Dr. makes me sound like an old man! I prefer being YOUNG. :laugh:
That happened to me in General Biology once. My instructor was a ladie, and she took it very personally implying I addressed her as Mrs. "because of her extra X chromosome". What a pompous convoluted jjashik.
 

stlouis79

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I urge you students to take this into account, simply because it makes you seem kind of stupid if you express so much passion for pharmacy and can't even differentiate between a professional school and a graduate school. it irritates actual graduate students, makes some adcoms question you as a potential pharmacy student, and it kinda irks me to be honest.
I think that quote makes you look kind of stupid...to be honest with you. Dont sweat the petty stuff....pet the sweaty stuff, and stop caring about **** that doesn't matter.
 

Pharmdapp87

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A.) Are you guys serious? Do you know the amount of time and effort it takes to get a PhD? Are you even aware of the timeline and processes that occur in graduate school? Becoming a candidate which entails a qualifying exams that is not particularly easy due to the fact of concentrating on your specific field of study, meet with your committee members to talk about the specific research experiments you will be performing... it's not easy. Along with that you'll have to take a few classes relative to your field of research. Not to mention, you have to write a thesis, defend it with the data you obtained in front of a group of expertises in your specialization, and publish a bunch of papers to back up every little detail that these expertises may pick at (which most of you on here probably cannot attest to). It's a lot of work getting a PhD. Some less than others, but the schooling is none like anything you have seen. In undergrad you are basically told what to do and how to do it and your life is mapped out for you. In Grad school you have a committee explain to you what experiments they suggest, and then you figure out everything on your own. Sure you have a mentor or a PI to help you along the way but ultimately, you take on the work. Ever wonder why some graduate students have bags under their eyes? So, it would be pure disrespect to not call your professor Dr. so and so, since they are the ones with a specific knowledge in a specific field which they will pass on to you. It makes A LOT of sense. And by the way, I'm pretty sure the term "doctor", is actually broken down to mean teacher, adviser and scholar. doct- meaning to teach or show and er- meaning "one who" (thank you medical terminology). Not to mention the fact that before society starting using the term colloquially every doctor that was seen or mentioned was usually in theology. So if you ask me, your "bent out of shape professors" are actually right. Doctors can be applied professional and academic. http://dctech.com/physics/features/0203.php
http://forums.degreeinfo.com/showthread.php?t=27711

B.) Let's just end it right here. You have a doctorate, than by golly gee wiz you have the right to be called a doctor. If only i could get the rest of you to look at the big picture. Whether someone wants to be called a doctor or not is completely up to them, but if they were not a doctor they would not have a doctorate. Pharmacist, Physicians, even RN's who go on to obtain their doctorates of whatever kind, and Lawyers holding the ever so coveted JD degree are all doctors. Once again, Doctor does not = Physician. And just because someone with a DOCTORATE degree wants to be referred as a doctor and isn't in medicine it doesn't mean they are bitter Med school rejects. Get it through your heads people. Not everyone wants to take that plunge, some people have different views on what they want to do with their lives. So pelase, stop pulling out that "bitter med school reject card" it's as old and lame as the 'I have a black friend" and race card. Have a great day:)

Oh. Ps. For those of you who completely object to this, go sit down with your professor and continue to call them Mrs or Mr. antaganizingly. It would make for a great humbling experience, I'm sure.
 

Pharmdapp87

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I think that quote makes you look kind of stupid...to be honest with you. Dont sweat the petty stuff....pet the sweaty stuff, and stop caring about **** that doesn't matter.
I never said I sweated it. And I don't think it makes me look stupid seeing as I've gotten the same lecture from a couple of deans and professors. If you don't wanna do it then don't. Keep referring to pharm school as a grad school or whatever, not a big deal, just thought I'd give those out there a heads up about how dumb it sounds when you go to the admissions committee and say " I want to be apart of your graduate school because...."
 

stlouis79

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I never said I sweated it. And I don't think it makes me look stupid seeing as I've gotten the same lecture from a couple of deans and professors. If you don't wanna do it then don't. Keep referring to pharm school as a grad school or whatever, not a big deal, just thought I'd give those out there a heads up about how dumb it sounds when you go to the admissions committee and say " I want to be apart of your graduate school because...."
I'm not saying your'e not right, grad schools are completely different that professional schools. Just sounded condescending and pretentious. I honestly can't imagine many people feel that strongly about the distinction between the two to say it sounds idiotic to interchange them, but many professors are pretentious so your'e probably right.
 

AngelaCL

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Lawyers have JDs, but I've yet to hear a lawyer (without an MD or Ph. D) insist on being called "doctor". I think it's inappropriate for non-MDs to call themselves "doctor" in a health care setting, as that + white coat is going to make patients think you are an MD, when you are not. And if you are in retail pharmacy and insist on being called doctor, people are going to think you are a douchebag.

Yeah, we're all earning or have earned our doctorates, and can all technically use the title of "doctor." But besides your own mother, don't be surprised if no body wants to call you that.
 

confettiflyer

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Lawyers have JDs, but I've yet to hear a lawyer (without an MD or Ph. D) insist on being called "doctor". I think it's inappropriate for non-MDs to call themselves "doctor" in a health care setting, as that + white coat is going to make patients think you are an MD, when you are not. And if you are in retail pharmacy and insist on being called doctor, people are going to think you are a douchebag.

Yeah, we're all earning or have earned our doctorates, and can all technically use the title of "doctor." But besides your own mother, don't be surprised if no body wants to call you that.
Well there's a history behind the JD thing. It used to be the LLB until the powers at be wanted to "bring it in line" with the other doctorate level degrees in order to reflect the additional 3 years required beyond a BS/BA. The schools didn't do anything different to their programs (in fact, some schools have retained LLB as a matter of tradition). As a matter of Common Law and legal tradition, no one in their right mind uses "doctor" within the legal field with the exception of a JD testifying in a trial as an "expert witness." Otherwise, we're left with the terms counselor, your honor, barrister, and solicitor.

So basically, in summary, the D in JD reflects years in school.

The PharmD, on the otherhand, evolved out of BS Pharm only after the addition of a year of clinical rotations were added.
 

Pharmdapp87

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I'm not saying your'e not right, grad schools are completely different that professional schools. Just sounded condescending and pretentious. I honestly can't imagine many people feel that strongly about the distinction between the two to say it sounds idiotic to interchange them, but many professors are pretentious so your'e probably right.
Oh, ok, didn't want to come across that way at all. But yeah, many professors are pretentious. I had one guy who went to Yale lecture our entire class about the greatness of research. And then when one of the students told him that he was going to pursue medicine and that he didn't know that medical school had to do research and such (he thought it was a grad school). Needless to say, the professor was not happy and called medical/pharm/nursing students mindless entities of the health profession trying to gamble people out of their money and how he would never put them in the same category with the people who pursued research blah blah blah. So, to avoid any other conflict (or 1 hour lecture) I made the distinctions between grad schools and professional schools. Sorry if I came of that way, I was just trying to help :oops:. But yeah, it's kinda funny how one more year of rotations can be all the difference from a BS to a Doctorate.... hmm.... the gears are going lol.
 

SHC1984

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A.) Are you guys serious? Do you know the amount of time and effort it takes to get a PhD? Are you even aware of the timeline and processes that occur in graduate school? Becoming a candidate which entails a qualifying exams that is not particularly easy due to the fact of concentrating on your specific field of study, meet with your committee members to talk about the specific research experiments you will be performing... it's not easy. Along with that you'll have to take a few classes relative to your field of research. Not to mention, you have to write a thesis, defend it with the data you obtained in front of a group of expertises in your specialization, and publish a bunch of papers to back up every little detail that these expertises may pick at (which most of you on here probably cannot attest to). It's a lot of work getting a PhD. Some less than others, but the schooling is none like anything you have seen. In undergrad you are basically told what to do and how to do it and your life is mapped out for you. In Grad school you have a committee explain to you what experiments they suggest, and then you figure out everything on your own. Sure you have a mentor or a PI to help you along the way but ultimately, you take on the work. Ever wonder why some graduate students have bags under their eyes? So, it would be pure disrespect to not call your professor Dr. so and so, since they are the ones with a specific knowledge in a specific field which they will pass on to you. It makes A LOT of sense. And by the way, I'm pretty sure the term "doctor", is actually broken down to mean teacher, adviser and scholar. doct- meaning to teach or show and er- meaning "one who" (thank you medical terminology). Not to mention the fact that before society starting using the term colloquially every doctor that was seen or mentioned was usually in theology. So if you ask me, your "bent out of shape professors" are actually right. Doctors can be applied professional and academic. http://dctech.com/physics/features/0203.php
http://forums.degreeinfo.com/showthread.php?t=27711

B.) Let's just end it right here. You have a doctorate, than by golly gee wiz you have the right to be called a doctor. If only i could get the rest of you to look at the big picture. Whether someone wants to be called a doctor or not is completely up to them, but if they were not a doctor they would not have a doctorate. Pharmacist, Physicians, even RN's who go on to obtain their doctorates of whatever kind, and Lawyers holding the ever so coveted JD degree are all doctors. Once again, Doctor does not = Physician. And just because someone with a DOCTORATE degree wants to be referred as a doctor and isn't in medicine it doesn't mean they are bitter Med school rejects. Get it through your heads people. Not everyone wants to take that plunge, some people have different views on what they want to do with their lives. So pelase, stop pulling out that "bitter med school reject card" it's as old and lame as the 'I have a black friend" and race card. Have a great day:)

Oh. Ps. For those of you who completely object to this, go sit down with your professor and continue to call them Mrs or Mr. antaganizingly. It would make for a great humbling experience, I'm sure.
I agree with you that getting a PhD is very hard and the people with PhD is very smart etc etc...And I do respect all my professors...but I just had one chem professor that gets mad when people call her Mrs. instead of Dr. (I only did it once b/c I thought she was a TA...:rolleyes: she sucked at teaching! :laugh:)

But I just think its shows that you are a very insecure person if you DEMAND that everyone call you a doctor (especially if you don't have an MD...:rolleyes:)

It would be like an attractive woman demanding EVERY guy that see her call her "HOT"...it shows that you are very verry insecure...I mean if you are really that hot then why do you need to be reminded every second of every day? :rolleyes:
 
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SHC1984

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Lawyers have JDs, but I've yet to hear a lawyer (without an MD or Ph. D) insist on being called "doctor". I think it's inappropriate for non-MDs to call themselves "doctor" in a health care setting, as that + white coat is going to make patients think you are an MD, when you are not. And if you are in retail pharmacy and insist on being called doctor, people are going to think you are a douchebag.

Yeah, we're all earning or have earned our doctorates, and can all technically use the title of "doctor." But besides your own mother, don't be surprised if no body wants to call you that.
:laugh: so true....can't agree more...
 

mike36

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A.) Are you guys serious? Do you know the amount of time and effort it takes to get a PhD? Are you even aware of the timeline and processes that occur in graduate school? Becoming a candidate which entails a qualifying exams that is not particularly easy due to the fact of concentrating on your specific field of study, meet with your committee members to talk about the specific research experiments you will be performing... it's not easy. Along with that you'll have to take a few classes relative to your field of research. Not to mention, you have to write a thesis, defend it with the data you obtained in front of a group of expertises in your specialization, and publish a bunch of papers to back up every little detail that these expertises may pick at (which most of you on here probably cannot attest to). It's a lot of work getting a PhD. Some less than others, but the schooling is none like anything you have seen. In undergrad you are basically told what to do and how to do it and your life is mapped out for you. In Grad school you have a committee explain to you what experiments they suggest, and then you figure out everything on your own. Sure you have a mentor or a PI to help you along the way but ultimately, you take on the work. Ever wonder why some graduate students have bags under their eyes? So, it would be pure disrespect to not call your professor Dr. so and so, since they are the ones with a specific knowledge in a specific field which they will pass on to you. It makes A LOT of sense. And by the way, I'm pretty sure the term "doctor", is actually broken down to mean teacher, adviser and scholar. doct- meaning to teach or show and er- meaning "one who" (thank you medical terminology). Not to mention the fact that before society starting using the term colloquially every doctor that was seen or mentioned was usually in theology. So if you ask me, your "bent out of shape professors" are actually right. Doctors can be applied professional and academic. http://dctech.com/physics/features/0203.php
http://forums.degreeinfo.com/showthread.php?t=27711

B.) Let's just end it right here. You have a doctorate, than by golly gee wiz you have the right to be called a doctor. If only i could get the rest of you to look at the big picture. Whether someone wants to be called a doctor or not is completely up to them, but if they were not a doctor they would not have a doctorate. Pharmacist, Physicians, even RN's who go on to obtain their doctorates of whatever kind, and Lawyers holding the ever so coveted JD degree are all doctors. Once again, Doctor does not = Physician. And just because someone with a DOCTORATE degree wants to be referred as a doctor and isn't in medicine it doesn't mean they are bitter Med school rejects. Get it through your heads people. Not everyone wants to take that plunge, some people have different views on what they want to do with their lives. So pelase, stop pulling out that "bitter med school reject card" it's as old and lame as the 'I have a black friend" and race card. Have a great day:)

Oh. Ps. For those of you who completely object to this, go sit down with your professor and continue to call them Mrs or Mr. antaganizingly. It would make for a great humbling experience, I'm sure.
:thumbup::thumbup: It never ceases to amaze me that pharmacy students don't even know that they are in a professional program rather than a graduate program. I guess that's a little off topic though...
 

evilolive

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:thumbup::thumbup: It never ceases to amaze me that pharmacy students don't even know that they are in a professional program rather than a graduate program. I guess that's a little off topic though...
Uh but pharmacy school is a graduate school...even if it is a professional program.
 

Pharmdapp87

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:thumbup::thumbup: It never ceases to amaze me that pharmacy students don't even know that they are in a professional program rather than a graduate program. I guess that's a little off topic though...
Yeah, sometimes I don't understand how that mix-up occurs. However, pharmacy students should know better. pre-pharm students, maybe, but pharm students don't have any excuses.
 

Pharmdapp87

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Uh but pharmacy school is a graduate school...even if it is a professional program.
No, graduate school and professional programs are two different things a) all graduate schools require a BS degree or higher to attend, hence you must graduate in order to matriculate into the curriculum. Pharmacy school does not require this.
b.) True graduate schools require 2 unique processes that pharmacy school lacks when dealing with obtaining a doctorate. 1. you must come up with and defend a thesis or disseratation 2. Produce research that is ultimately there to help defend your thesis. In addition, this research is funded by a grant given to lucky researchers and PhD hopefulls by organizations or the government. Graduate school is in itself a totally different experience. This is why whenever you hear pharmacy being referred to it is never put in the same sentence as graduate school unless you are pursuing a specific discipline such as Medicinal Chemistry, Pharmacodynamics, Pharmacognosy, Pharmacology (which is almost always in the college of Medicine) etc... If you don't believe me, and I'm sure you won't, then go talk to your TA for your pharmacy classes and ask them, or go talk to one of your teachers/deans. 9/10 (I'm sure 10/10 but everyone is different) you will get a similar answer. If this weren't the case, I wouldn't hear PhD candidates, PharmD graduates or PhD graduates correct every person who mistakenly calls pharmacy school a graduate school.
 

stlouis79

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The problem is many people go into research or health fields just for the "respectability" that it brings them. I guess whatever makes people feel important. My sister, at one time, wanted to get her PhD just so people would call her Doctor (****ing lame). I think you get respect from people not by being a Dr., but by making the people you interact with feel important and really wanting to help improve peoples lives. There is way too many pissing contests with health professionals (and professors alike) and it dilutes the quality of care people receive. I have the utmost respect for anyone who dedicates their selves to helping other people.....but when it starts to become an ego issue I will always calla spade a spade.
 
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evilolive

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No, graduate school and professional programs are two different things a) all graduate schools require a BS degree or higher to attend, hence you must graduate in order to matriculate into the curriculum. Pharmacy school does not require this.
b.) True graduate schools require 2 unique processes that pharmacy school lacks when dealing with obtaining a doctorate. 1. you must come up with and defend a thesis or disseratation 2. Produce research that is ultimately there to help defend your thesis. In addition, this research is funded by a grant given to lucky researchers and PhD hopefulls by organizations or the government. Graduate school is in itself a totally different experience. This is why whenever you hear pharmacy being referred to it is never put in the same sentence as graduate school unless you are pursuing a specific discipline such as Medicinal Chemistry, Pharmacodynamics, Pharmacognosy, Pharmacology (which is almost always in the college of Medicine) etc... If you don't believe me, and I'm sure you won't, then go talk to your TA for your pharmacy classes and ask them, or go talk to one of your teachers/deans. 9/10 (I'm sure 10/10 but everyone is different) you will get a similar answer. If this weren't the case, I wouldn't hear PhD candidates, PharmD graduates or PhD graduates correct every person who mistakenly calls pharmacy school a graduate school.
They certainly don't make that correction nor distinction here. Maybe we're all just unaware of it, but the term graduate student around here is used more as a colloquial term for something post undergraduate. I guess we actually produce a pseudo thesis/dissertation of sorts here :) It's not really PhD quality, but they require all PharmD students to write a proposal, conduct the research/data collect, and then come up some conclusions and defend it before a committee. It's about a two year long process that's unique to our college of pharmacy, though most of the time students tag along on current research; however, every year there are always the ambitious among the pharmacy students that co-author publications.

edit: it looks like you're right in terms of the distinctions! It's weird to refer to yourself as a professional student though. Graduate student seems like such a better generic encompassing term. What do you refer to people who are getting their master's? MDs/JDs I assumed were also graduate students too.
 
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ffpickle

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They certainly don't make that correction nor distinction here. Maybe we're all just unaware of it, but the term graduate student around here is used more as a colloquial term for something post undergraduate. I guess we actually produce a pseudo thesis/dissertation of sorts here :) It's not really PhD quality, but they require all PharmD students to write a proposal, conduct the research/data collect, and then come up some conclusions and defend it before a committee. It's about a two year long process that's unique to our college of pharmacy.
It gets confusing because the terms professional school & graduate school are misused regularly. Pharm degrees were once BScPharms. This was not a graduate degree but was still a professional degree. Today, undergrads in engineering & nursing are not graduate school but *are* considered professional schools since graduates are eligible for government-recognized licensures post-graduation.
 

MrBoba

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edit: it looks like you're right in terms of the distinctions! It's weird to refer to yourself as a professional student though. Graduate student seems like such a better generic encompassing term. What do you refer to people who are getting their master's? MDs/JDs I assumed were also graduate students too.
Aren't those who are pursuing a Masters considered graduate students?

Anyhow, you wouldn't call us professional students, but pharmacy "pharm" students. Just like those in med school are med students.
 

Pharmdapp87

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They certainly don't make that correction nor distinction here. Maybe we're all just unaware of it, but the term graduate student around here is used more as a colloquial term for something post undergraduate. I guess we actually produce a pseudo thesis/dissertation of sorts here :) It's not really PhD quality, but they require all PharmD students to write a proposal, conduct the research/data collect, and then come up some conclusions and defend it before a committee. It's about a two year long process that's unique to our college of pharmacy, though most of the time students tag along on current research; however, every year there are always the ambitious among the pharmacy students that co-author publications.

edit: it looks like you're right in terms of the distinctions! It's weird to refer to yourself as a professional student though. Graduate student seems like such a better generic encompassing term. What do you refer to people who are getting their master's? MDs/JDs I assumed were also graduate students too.
That's interesting. I'm intrigued that you guys are requried to do research and collect data and defend your research along with classes and such. I think it's a good thing, it gets more people involved with research and possibly leads to academia.

As far as graduate school goes and who is considered and what is required, there are distinctions but everything is always blurred. For instance, getting masters in say psychology vs getting a masters in business. Defining the two specializations is somewhat hard because there are always exceptions and such. Law school, med school, dental school etc are all graduate programs, and some schools... actually I'm sure most schools divide grad school into two parts: Professional and Research
 

ValeRx

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So what about colleges like Ohio State, which require you to have a Bachelor's degree to get into their pharmacy school?
 

SHC1984

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That's interesting. I'm intrigued that you guys are requried to do research and collect data and defend your research along with classes and such. I think it's a good thing, it gets more people involved with research and possibly leads to academia.

As far as graduate school goes and who is considered and what is required, there are distinctions but everything is always blurred. For instance, getting masters in say psychology vs getting a masters in business. Defining the two specializations is somewhat hard because there are always exceptions and such. Law school, med school, dental school etc are all graduate programs, and some schools... actually I'm sure most schools divide grad school into two parts: Professional and Research
I know for a fact that most dental schools do NOT require a bachelors degree...in fact only two or three require a bachelors degree--NYU, Harvard, and I think UPenn requires one...but all the other dental schools do NOT require a bachelors....
And if I am not mistaken, some medical schools don't require a bachelors either...however medical schools are very competitive so your chances of getting in is very low if you don't get one.
So aren't dental and med schools professional schools instead?
 

fenixtnlfan

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They certainly don't make that correction nor distinction here. Maybe we're all just unaware of it, but the term graduate student around here is used more as a colloquial term for something post undergraduate. I guess we actually produce a pseudo thesis/dissertation of sorts here :) It's not really PhD quality, but they require all PharmD students to write a proposal, conduct the research/data collect, and then come up some conclusions and defend it before a committee. It's about a two year long process that's unique to our college of pharmacy, though most of the time students tag along on current research; however, every year there are always the ambitious among the pharmacy students that co-author publications.
That's not unique to your school. We do a research project too. I already have people starting in my class (P1), overachievers!

I think it's weird to call myself a grad student as that indicates someone who is either going for a masters or Ph.D. Where I'm from the professional students always say exactly what they are studying, like pharmacy student, medical student, etc.
 

hokierx

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I know for a fact that most dental schools do NOT require a bachelors degree...in fact only two or three require a bachelors degree--NYU, Harvard, and I think UPenn requires one...but all the other dental schools do NOT require a bachelors....
And if I am not mistaken, some medical schools don't require a bachelors either...however medical schools are very competitive so your chances of getting in is very low if you don't get one.
So aren't dental and med schools professional schools instead?

Dent and Med schools are definitely professional schools, not graduate programs...professional schools are schools that train you for a PROFESSION. convenient name there. You chose to apply/attend these schools because you know what you want to do with your life, and are taking the measures to get there. When you graduate from Dent, Med, Law, Pharm, Opt, and whatever else, you are allowed to practice in that profession (given that you passed licensing exams).

PhD awardees get to brag that they know a lot about what they got their degree in, and they get a higher salary. They can do a lot of other things too, i just did not take the time to look it all up as that is not what i want to do.

Also, Dentists and Doctors actually get to write prescriptions. Pharmacists do not. now there is some leeway here and there, but someone cannot come up to you at the counter and you cannot check them out and give them something, they must have a prescription from a physician or dentist (yes, dentists give out prescriptions...i got one for special toothpaste once??). Same with psychiatrists. Psychiatrists are the only ones who are allowed to write prescriptions in treating mental diseases because they have a PhD in psychology AND went to med school.

Most importantly, Lawyers, for sure, cannot write prescriptions (thank god).
 
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fenixtnlfan

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Psychiatrists are the only ones who are allowed to write prescriptions in treating mental diseases because they have a PhD in psychology AND went to med school.
This is not correct. Psychiatrists only have an MD or DO. It would take them until their 40's if they were going to do a PhD too! Psychologists on the other hand get a PhD but they can't prescribe. Any physician can prescribe meds for mental disorders. However, if it's a long-term problem the patient should be seeing a specialist.
 

evilolive

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That's not unique to your school. We do a research project too. I already have people starting in my class (P1), overachievers!

I think it's weird to call myself a grad student as that indicates someone who is either going for a masters or Ph.D. Where I'm from the professional students always say exactly what they are studying, like pharmacy student, medical student, etc.
Really! I assume yours is set up similar to ours then with its own huffy puffy committee and red tape. Anyways, I meant unique in that most colleges of pharmacy don't require them :) I mean they're always optional for the overachievers in other institutions, but most of our graduates that went on to residencies said that the process was overwhelmingly useful. It would still be pretty cool to be published while you're in school though.
 

Storm90

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The only people I want calling me "Dr." when I graduate are those PITA telemarketers. "Is Dr. Storm90 there?" Why yes he is. "Is Mr. Storm90 there?" Nope, no Mr. here. That and whenever I was in trouble as a kid, I was called Mr. Traumatized me for life it did!