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Clinical Psychology Postdoc Abroad

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mindnerd

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Let's say that I complete a research postdoc abroad and become licensed abroad (e.g., NZ, AU, UK, IT) after completing a doctoral program and APA accredited internship in the US. Would I be able to come back to the US and apply for licensure without having completed a 1-2 year postdoc as is required for licensure in most states?
 

AcronymAllergy

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My guess: without the required amount/duration of supervision, probably not, unless you'd been practicing ~10+ years and qualified via that route.

That's not to say you couldn't ever be licensed, you'd just probably need to find someone to supervise you for a year. The only state I think I ever looked at that might have had a time limit on getting the needed supervision was GA, and I'm not even sure on that anymore.
 
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PsyDr

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No. Most commonwealth countries license psychologists (and physicians) at the masters level. Most USA states require that the postdoc have a licensed supervisor, and that the postdoc be equivalent to those in their state. A foreign postdoc will not have a USA licensed supervisor.

Keep in mind that these decisions are made by entry level state employees who are trained to say “no” to any deviations from their rubric, and have zero incentive to say “yes” to deviations. This isn’t a bunch of people who are thoughtfully considering anything. Foreign license agencies are worse.
 
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Sanman

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The final decision lies with the licensing board of whatever state you would like to be licensed in. However, my best guess is no. People do separate research and clinical post-docs here in the U.S., international work is even less likely to count here (excepting Canada).
 
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The final decision lies with the licensing board of whatever state you would like to be licensed in. However, my best guess is no. People do separate research and clinical post-docs here in the U.S., international work is even less likely to count here (excepting Canada).
This. In my state (MA) you could, as long as your predoctoral practicum and internship met the standards. No postdoc is required.
 
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Therapist4Chnge

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A lot of students love the idea of working overseas, but it is largely not a realistic option during your training years. Prev noted was that other countries have different standards, nearly all lower than what the USA and Canada require; this typically limits to fully excludes any kind of training you do abroad. The most realistic approach would be to get licensed in the state where you plan on living (at least for the first few years) and then explore opportunities abroad. I've seen people relocate to Canada, Australia, England, and couple down in the Caribbean (connected to med programs)....though all were done *after* being fully licensed.
 
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mindnerd

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Thanks so much, everyone! Incredibly helpful. It seems that the safest option is to get licensed here and then move abroad, unless I move back to a state that doesn't require a postdoc.
 
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