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NotASerialKiller

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Mostly memorization, sometimes interesting sometimes not

Lots of free time (P/F)

It's not like that for everyone, people are different, you'll get a different response from every med student you ask
 
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Long Way to Go

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Hello, I was wondering what type of information is mostly learned in medical school. For example, is it mostly memorization like in biology of pathways, structures, molecules, cycles, ect? Or is it more like general chemistry, where you have to learn complex abstract concepts and apply them to a problem given (I understand a lot of medical school is solving the problem of what the diagnosis is, I am not really referring to this type of "problem"). Do you find the information engaging or dry?
Yes.
All of the above.

Also, how often do you have exams? I know the weeks before exams are hectic and I wouldn't mind it if it was not like every other week. How does this compare to normal, non-exam weeks? Do you have time to go to dinner with friends, go to the bars for a few drinks, socialize a little, go on little day trips on saturdays or in other words feel like your still getting at least some experience of your 20's during non-exam weeks? Sorry for all the questions, I do not really know anyone in medicine and would love to get some insight. Thanks!
Every 2-4 weeks depending on the block. Exam weeks are a little busier but it depends on how well you've been keeping up.

Med School Metaphor: Pancakes Every Morning
It's from a different generation of medical school blogs, but every word in it rings true.
 
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bee17

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Hello, I was wondering what type of information is mostly learned in medical school. For example, is it mostly memorization like in biology of pathways, structures, molecules, cycles, ect? Or is it more like general chemistry, where you have to learn complex abstract concepts and apply them to a problem given (I understand a lot of medical school is solving the problem of what the diagnosis is, I am not really referring to this type of "problem"). Do you find the information engaging or dry?

Also, how often do you have exams? I know the weeks before exams are hectic and I wouldn't mind it if it was not like every other week. How does this compare to normal, non-exam weeks? Do you have time to go to dinner with friends, go to the bars for a few drinks, socialize a little, go on little day trips on saturdays or in other words feel like your still getting at least some experience of your 20's during non-exam weeks? Sorry for all the questions, I do not really know anyone in medicine and would love to get some insight. Thanks!

1. Memorization vs. conceptual: Both, although memorization-heavy
2. Engaging or dry: depends on the topic, although I have been able to find interesting/engaging aspects of topics that I thought were dry in general. Even if a topic is boring, the clinical application of that topic can be interesting.
3. Exam Frequency: mine are every 2 weeks, but this is school dependent. I love this schedule, because our exams are on Fridays, meaning every other weekend is a light or study-free weekend.
4. Exam weeks vs. non-exam weeks: My studying is pretty consistent. When you are never more than two weeks from an exam, you can't really afford to slack off and get behind.
5. Free time: I absolutely have time to do all the things you mentioned. You make time for the things that are important to you. Yes, there are sacrifices involved, but if you are smart with your schedule and stay on top of studying, you can definitely fit in hobbies/socializing. I reject the notion that going to professional school is somehow "wasting my 20s." Sure, there are stressful moments, but I'm living in a fun city, meeting new people, growing as a person, and working toward my future career. What else should I be doing with my 20s?
 
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