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Hey everyone. Can someone give me an explanation or timeline on how you decide and get into a specialization? I mean do you just randomly decide you wanna do it then apply? What is a "residency" ? Is it like med school where ur just working and getting a little pay? Or do u have to pay like it's more school? What are rotations? Also what does it mean to be "matched" I'm so confused. And will a pass/no pass system be a disadvantage In getting into one? This may sound dumb but i just want to get a gist of things
 

Big Time Hoosier

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Step 1) Get into dental school. Go to the cheapest school you get into.
Step 2) Find out if there's a sub-field of dentistry you want to devote your career to. Maybe you already have an idea before school starts, but this may change once you actually dive into it.
Step 3) Start gunning. You'll likely want some research, service, and leadership on the ol' CV.
Step 4) Oral surgery? Nail the CBSE. Everything else? Nail the ADAT.
Step 5) Keep gunning, because your competition is.
Step 6) Apply the summer between D3/D4.
Step 7) After interviews, patiently wait for the Match Wizard to tell you where you're going. Pray that you'll end up at a residency that doesn't charge tuition.
Step 8) Match Day!
Step 9) Start and finish residency. This will entail clinical and didactic work and research.
Step 10) Realize the Department of Education owns you until your loans are paid back.

Big Hoss
 
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Gyuji

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Step 7) After interviews, patiently wait for the Match Wizard to tell you where you're going. Pray that you'll end up at a residency that doesn't charge tuition.
I'm no dental student nor any kind of student...

Though, you're saying after 4 years of dental school(debt), there's a chance of adding another year of tuition(debt) to it? :inpain:
 

Big Time Hoosier

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I'm no dental student nor any kind of student...

Though, you're saying after 4 years of dental school(debt), there's a chance of adding another year of tuition(debt) to it? :inpain:
Some orthodontic and endodontic residencies charge $200,000 to $300,000 in tuition. Of course this is all on top of potentially $500,000+ in loans for dental school. Anyone still wonder why I'm so adamant to go to the cheapest dental school you get into?

Big Hoss
 
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Incis0r

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Step 1) Get into dental school. Go to the cheapest school you get into.
Step 2) Find out if there's a sub-field of dentistry you want to devote your career to. Maybe you already have an idea before school starts, but this may change once you actually dive into it.
Step 3) Start gunning. You'll likely want some research, service, and leadership on the ol' CV.
Step 4) Oral surgery? Nail the CBSE. Everything else? Nail the ADAT.
Step 5) Keep gunning, because your competition is.
Step 6) Apply the summer between D3/D4.
Step 7) After interviews, patiently wait for the Match Wizard to tell you where you're going. Pray that you'll end up at a residency that doesn't charge tuition.
Step 8) Match Day!
Step 9) Start and finish residency. This will entail clinical and didactic work and research.
Step 10) Realize the Department of Education owns you until your loans are paid back.

Big Hoss
Simple, straight to the point.

I'd buy your book.
 

2TH MVR

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Yep,

Big Hoss basically laid it out. One thing I might add is you might get lucky and get accepted to a grad program that pays a stipend. I was lucky in that regard. If I recall correctly .... my stipend paid all of the tuition and I actually had money left over for ..... food. A hospital based grad program where I served as the 3rd on-call doctor. In other words .... if a patient shows up at the hospital with a dental related issue .... a GPR resident or OS resident have the 1st call. If neither GPR or OS resident were available ... then the ortho residents would be called. Luckily (for the patient) ... I was never needed. ;)
 

caffeine jitters

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Apr 1, 2017
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Step 1) Get into dental school. Go to the cheapest school you get into.
Step 2) Find out if there's a sub-field of dentistry you want to devote your career to. Maybe you already have an idea before school starts, but this may change once you actually dive into it.
Step 3) Start gunning. You'll likely want some research, service, and leadership on the ol' CV.
Step 4) Oral surgery? Nail the CBSE. Everything else? Nail the ADAT.
Step 5) Keep gunning, because your competition is.
Step 6) Apply the summer between D3/D4.
Step 7) After interviews, patiently wait for the Match Wizard to tell you where you're going. Pray that you'll end up at a residency that doesn't charge tuition.
Step 8) Match Day!
Step 9) Start and finish residency. This will entail clinical and didactic work and research.
Step 10) Realize the Department of Education owns you until your loans are paid back.

Big Hoss
For step 3, would you say that our leadership and service would need to be in dental school? As in, things from undergrad wouldn't really count (the same way things from high-school didn't really count when we got to undergrad)?
 

Big Time Hoosier

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For step 3, would you say that our leadership and service would need to be in dental school? As in, things from undergrad wouldn't really count (the same way things from high-school didn't really count when we got to undergrad)?
I suppose ideally you'd have a track record of leadership and service that extends from before dental school, throughout school, and following graduation (if you're applying after practicing a while, like myself).

Big Hoss
 

Steins;Gate

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Aug 25, 2015
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I suppose ideally you'd have a track record of leadership and service that extends from before dental school, throughout school, and following graduation (if you're applying after practicing a while, like myself).

Big Hoss
To clarify, you do not intend to apply as a dental student but after a few years of working as a GP? Why is this?
 
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DJ86

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Big Hoss,

Which branch are you currently serving in, and are you getting out after you complete your ADSO from the HPSP? Also what are the ups and downs of serving and being a dentist? I'm currently a combat medic (Army) with over 7 years of active service. I've decided to cut sling-load and get out to pursue dentistry. I'll complete a post bacc to get my 40 credits of pre-req work then apply to HPSP. If you can also provide some insight on what you believe helped you get accepted for the scholarship it'll be greatly appreciated!


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Big Time Hoosier

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Big Hoss,

Which branch are you currently serving in, and are you getting out after you complete your ADSO from the HPSP? Also what are the ups and downs of serving and being a dentist? I'm currently a combat medic (Army) with over 7 years of active service. I've decided to cut sling-load and get out to pursue dentistry. I'll complete a post bacc to get my 40 credits of pre-req work then apply to HPSP. If you can also provide some insight on what you believe helped you get accepted for the scholarship it'll be greatly appreciated!


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I'm serving in the world's finest Navy, but I'm planning to get out when my obligation is fulfilled. I'm interested in pursuing Pediatric Dentistry, and there's not much need in the military and the need there is will always keep you stationed OCONUS. Even though I'm planning to get out, I have absolutely no regrets taking the HPSP and am very proud to have served. Being a dentist in the military is a pretty sweet gig, though it comes with the usual military BS that you're all too aware of. Not to try to turn you from Green to Blue, but the Navy has a program called the HSCP. They pay you as if you're active duty and the time you're in school counts towards retirement, and since you're prior service this is something to think about. However, you have to pay your own tuition, but if you still have the GI Bill you should be good to go. As far as the HPSP, a solid GPA and DAT score are the biggest factors, I believe. Best of luck to you!

Big Hoss
 

schmoob

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Big Hoss,

Which branch are you currently serving in, and are you getting out after you complete your ADSO from the HPSP? Also what are the ups and downs of serving and being a dentist? I'm currently a combat medic (Army) with over 7 years of active service. I've decided to cut sling-load and get out to pursue dentistry. I'll complete a post bacc to get my 40 credits of pre-req work then apply to HPSP. If you can also provide some insight on what you believe helped you get accepted for the scholarship it'll be greatly appreciated!


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Have you used TA to pay for your undergrad degree?
If you have a local community college, start taking pre-reqs while still on AD. If you cannot use TA because you already have your undergrad degree, I would go as far as paying out of pocket. CC isn't super expensive and getting a few of those classes knocked out will help you. The reason I say this is because there is no guarantee that you will get HPSP, and your GI Bill will be much more valuable in dental school. Even better if you decide to go blue like Hoss said and pursue HSCP.
 

DJ86

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Oct 2, 2014
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Have you used TA to pay for your undergrad degree?
If you have a local community college, start taking pre-reqs while still on AD. If you cannot use TA because you already have your undergrad degree, I would go as far as paying out of pocket. CC isn't super expensive and getting a few of those classes knocked out will help you. The reason I say this is because there is no guarantee that you will get HPSP, and your GI Bill will be much more valuable in dental school. Even better if you decide to go blue like Hoss said and pursue HSCP.
Thanks Schmoob, yes I used TA to finish my undergrad degree. I'm currently in Alaska and was accepted into University of Alaska Fairbanks, but had a change of heart due to the optempo of my unit, and my science gpa from over 8 years ago. Being a non-trad student I'm at a point where I want to do extremely well in all of the pre-reqs to show that I'm serious about my education and that I can handle the rigors of dental school. I will definitely also look into the HSCP.


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schmoob

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Thanks Schmoob, yes I used TA to finish my undergrad degree. I'm currently in Alaska and was accepted into University of Alaska Fairbanks, but had a change of heart due to the optempo of my unit, and my science gpa from over 8 years ago. Being a non-trad student I'm at a point where I want to do extremely well in all of the pre-reqs to show that I'm serious about my education and that I can handle the rigors of dental school. I will definitely also look into the HSCP.


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Awesome to hear. I was a nontrad alsobandncame in with a lower GPA. I paid out of pocket for alot of stuff and do not regret it. I also looked into all the other services. You have lots of options.
Importantly, if you get out and are not accepted back in service, the VA has your back. I'm familiar with many options so if you have specific questions feel free to PM. I'm always happy to help another service member.
 
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DJ86

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Awesome to hear. I was a nontrad alsobandncame in with a lower GPA. I paid out of pocket for alot of stuff and do not regret it. I also looked into all the other services. You have lots of options.
Importantly, if you get out and are not accepted back in service, the VA has your back. I'm familiar with many options so if you have specific questions feel free to PM. I'm always happy to help another service member.
I appreciate it. I have a list of questions lol, I'll reach out soon.


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Armyhealth

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Big Hoss,

Which branch are you currently serving in, and are you getting out after you complete your ADSO from the HPSP? Also what are the ups and downs of serving and being a dentist? I'm currently a combat medic (Army) with over 7 years of active service. I've decided to cut sling-load and get out to pursue dentistry. I'll complete a post bacc to get my 40 credits of pre-req work then apply to HPSP. If you can also provide some insight on what you believe helped you get accepted for the scholarship it'll be greatly appreciated!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Had two prior service Army guys get accepted for the dental HPSP last year. Hit me up if you have any questions!
 

pinwheeels

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Dec 21, 2017
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I'm interested in pursuing Pediatric Dentistry, and there's not much need in the military and the need there is will always keep you stationed OCONUS.
Big Time Hoosier, I'm also interested in specializing in Pediatric Dentistry, but you're saying there's no need for this specialty at any CONUS bases? I would have expected differently with all the military families having their children taken care of in the dental clinic on base. Also, does the Navy even offer residency for Pediatric? Or does one have to obtain a residency outside the Navy, like they do in the Air Force?
 
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schmoob

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Big Time Hoosier, I'm also interested in specializing in Pediatric Dentistry, but you're saying there's no need for this specialty at any CONUS bases? I would have expected differently with all the military families having their children taken care of in the dental clinic on base. Also, does the Navy even offer residency for Pediatric? Or does one have to obtain a residency outside the Navy, like they do in the Air Force?
Dependents are usually seen out in town in CONUS. My wife and kids have never seen a military dentist. You pay for dental insurance for your family every month, it reflects in your LES.
 
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Big Time Hoosier

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Big Time Hoosier, I'm also interested in specializing in Pediatric Dentistry, but you're saying there's no need for this specialty at any CONUS bases? I would have expected differently with all the military families having their children taken care of in the dental clinic on base. Also, does the Navy even offer residency for Pediatric? Or does one have to obtain a residency outside the Navy, like they do in the Air Force?
Only active duty personnel are treated stateside, with few exceptions. Overseas is an entirely different story, where dependents have little to no option to be seen elsewhere. There are only a few CONUS billets and I was told by the current specialty leader to expect to be overseas 80-90% of your career as a pediatric dentist in the military.

None of the branches have their own residency program. When you’re applying for pediatric dentistry through the military you’re just applying for permission to apply to civilian programs. It’s then up to you to MATCH. I think in the Navy last cycle 8 people applied for 1 slot. So, your chances of doing it through the military kind of stink.

Big Hoss
 
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I don’t get it. So after I graduate, if I get into a residency, I have to pay for that? Aren’t they supposed to pay me? I’m working aren’t I ?? Isn’t it like med school??
 

pinwheeels

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Thanks for the quick responses guys! If the dental insurance makes it so that families have options to take their dependents anywhere to private practices in town, I don't blame them. Makes sense too why I only saw the army dentist when I had to get my cavities filled in Germany as a kid (with silver fillings on the front side of 2 of my bottom teeth - looked so ugly like permanent braces). If I'm able to receive this scholarship, looks like Pediatric would not be in the cards for me. I'll have to leave my decision to specialize open and figure out what specialty I seem to enjoy most while in school.
 

pinwheeels

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I don’t get it. So after I graduate, if I get into a residency, I have to pay for that? Aren’t they supposed to pay me? I’m working aren’t I ?? Isn’t it like med school??
From what I understand, each branch does have in-house residencies for most specialties, with the exception of Pediatrics and Orthodontics. You have to go to civilian school, which has to be approved by the specialty counselor and they will pay for your residency. These education years would be neutral and don't count toward your HPSP payback, and in fact you add on additional payback years when you return for however long your residency lasted. But if your civilian training was approved by your branch, then you can pay those years back concurrently with the remaining HPSP payback. Anyone else please correct me if anything is off.
 
OP
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From what I understand, each branch does have in-house residencies for most specialties, with the exception of Pediatrics and Orthodontics. You have to go to civilian school, which has to be approved by the specialty counselor and they will pay for your residency. These education years would be neutral and don't count toward your HPSP payback, and in fact you add on additional payback years when you return for however long your residency lasted. But if your civilian training was approved by your branch, then you can pay those years back concurrently with the remaining HPSP payback. Anyone else please correct me if anything is off.
I’m not talking bout the navy. I’m talking bout regular residencies and specializing (my original post). When u get accepted to specialize somewhere. Do you pay for it? Or do they pay you? Lol
 

sjv

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I’m not talking bout the navy. I’m talking bout regular residencies and specializing (my original post). When u get accepted to specialize somewhere. Do you pay for it? Or do they pay you? Lol
Depends on the residency, some have tuition while some give you a stipend.
 

schmoob

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From what I understand, each branch does have in-house residencies for most specialties, with the exception of Pediatrics and Orthodontics. You have to go to civilian school, which has to be approved by the specialty counselor and they will pay for your residency. These education years would be neutral and don't count toward your HPSP payback, and in fact you add on additional payback years when you return for however long your residency lasted. But if your civilian training was approved by your branch, then you can pay those years back concurrently with the remaining HPSP payback. Anyone else please correct me if anything is off.
The Tri-Services Orthodontics residency program is at the Air Force Postgraduate Dental School in San Antonio.
 

Big Time Hoosier

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I’m not talking bout the navy. I’m talking bout regular residencies and specializing (my original post). When u get accepted to specialize somewhere. Do you pay for it? Or do they pay you? Lol
Like someone has already said, it depends. Some may charge a ton of tuition, like $200,000 to $300,000 at some ortho programs. Others, especially hospital based ones, may be free and actually pay you a stipend of $40,000 to $50,000 a year.

Big Hoss
 

caffeine jitters

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From what I understand, each branch does have in-house residencies for most specialties, with the exception of Pediatrics and Orthodontics. You have to go to civilian school, which has to be approved by the specialty counselor and they will pay for your residency. These education years would be neutral and don't count toward your HPSP payback, and in fact you add on additional payback years when you return for however long your residency lasted. But if your civilian training was approved by your branch, then you can pay those years back concurrently with the remaining HPSP payback. Anyone else please correct me if anything is off.
I think all civilian residency payback will be neutral to HPSP payback. However, if you were to stay in-house, the residency payback would be concurrent to the HPSP payback.

This is assuming you are accepted to a program (military or civilian) between D3 and D4
 
OP
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Like someone has already said, it depends. Some may charge a ton of tuition, like $200,000 to $300,000 at some ortho programs. Others, especially hospital based ones, may be free and actually pay you a stipend of $40,000 to $50,000 a year.

Big Hoss
So ur basically on ur own after dental school? What if u don’t feel ready and want to do a general residency so someone can watch me all the time as I work! But I don’t want to pay for it I want them to pay me at least something while I’m learning. Is this possible. Like doctors get to go on and do residency and keep practicing before they work . They pay em. Not well, but it’s something
 

Big Time Hoosier

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So ur basically on ur own after dental school? What if u don’t feel ready and want to do a general residency so someone can watch me all the time as I work! But I don’t want to pay for it I want them to pay me at least something while I’m learning. Is this possible. Like doctors get to go on and do residency and keep practicing before they work . They pay em. Not well, but it’s something
Most GPR/AEGD programs will pay you a stipend.

Big Hoss
 
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