HarryMonster

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I've seen this post with other schools, but once again, I am someone who accepted a position (at Ohio State University), and then received a call on Friday saying I was off the Tufts waiting list. I was all set and now I have no idea what to do again! Tufts was originally my number 1 school. Here's my pros and cons list, from what I can remember:

Tufts
pros:
-small class size (which can be both good and bad, in my opinion)
-I really liked the people there (faculty and students)...I felt really comfortable
-signature programs and behavioral aspect seem awesome
-my boyfriend likes the prospect of attending grad school in Mass.
-closer to home in Northern NJ

cons:
-more expensive than Ohio, if I can definitely get in-state residency
-a little far from Boston, which is more a con for my boyfriend who wants to work and go to school there
-cost of living seems higher than Columbus
-I've heard the large animal program isn't as good as Ohio's (if anyone can explain how so, or dispute this, I'd appreciate it)
-facilities seemed a little outdated; lecture halls seemed like they might be uncomfortable?

Ohio
pros
-less expensive than Tufts (by ~$30,000 total) if I got in-state residency
-apartments seem cheap!
-facilities seemed very nice

cons
-9-10 hour drive from NJ
-apprehensive that everyone at the school will be like my interviewers (not the friendliest people)
-larger class size (again, both good and bad)

I'm sure I had more pros and cons for each, but my mind is fuzzy at this point in the day. To be honest, Ohio was my first interview and I thought I did horribly, so I think I blocked out most of the tour! By the time I got to Tufts, I was more experienced with the interview process, so that might explain why I was more comfortable.

In an ideal world, I would take the people from Tufts, put them in OSU's school, move it all to Massachusetts, and make it the cost of OSU's in-state tuition. Help! I have until Saturday to decide!:confused:
 

twelvetigers

stabby cat
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I think that liking the people is a big deal. That said, i'm guessing tha there ar lots of nice people from Ohio, you just had a bad sample. How important is staying close to family? How important is what your boyfriend would like? Could you afford the higher cost of living? Are you sure that residency is a good possibility at Tufts? Could you possibly go visit Ohio again? At least do a bit more research on the LA programs. Maybe some other people can offer more insight into the programs, as I have no idea about either one. Just listing things to consider, if you haven't already.

Good luck and they're both awesome schools!
 

chris03333

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I've seen this post with other schools, but once again, I am someone who accepted a position (at Ohio State University), and then received a call on Friday saying I was off the Tufts waiting list. I was all set and now I have no idea what to do again! Tufts was originally my number 1 school. Here's my pros and cons list, from what I can remember:

Tufts
pros:
-small class size (which can be both good and bad, in my opinion)
-I really liked the people there (faculty and students)...I felt really comfortable
-signature programs and behavioral aspect seem awesome
-my boyfriend likes the prospect of attending grad school in Mass.
-closer to home in Northern NJ

cons:
-more expensive than Ohio, if I can definitely get in-state residency
-a little far from Boston, which is more a con for my boyfriend who wants to work and go to school there
-cost of living seems higher than Columbus
-I've heard the large animal program isn't as good as Ohio's (if anyone can explain how so, or dispute this, I'd appreciate it)
-facilities seemed a little outdated; lecture halls seemed like they might be uncomfortable?

Ohio
pros
-less expensive than Tufts (by ~$30,000 total) if I got in-state residency
-apartments seem cheap!
-facilities seemed very nice

cons
-9-10 hour drive from NJ
-apprehensive that everyone at the school will be like my interviewers (not the friendliest people)
-larger class size (again, both good and bad)

I'm sure I had more pros and cons for each, but my mind is fuzzy at this point in the day. To be honest, Ohio was my first interview and I thought I did horribly, so I think I blocked out most of the tour! By the time I got to Tufts, I was more experienced with the interview process, so that might explain why I was more comfortable.

In an ideal world, I would take the people from Tufts, put them in OSU's school, move it all to Massachusetts, and make it the cost of OSU's in-state tuition. Help! I have until Saturday to decide!:confused:
With the pro/com list, my usual advice is to give each pro 1 point and each con -1 point then choose the choice with the highest total....well you have a "0" and a "0", so I guess that does not work to well here:laugh::smuggrin:

So I think you should look at your 2 pro list and decide which pros are more important and then look at your cons and decide which are most bothersome.
Then choose (Does the school with the more important pros make up for the cons...)
 

Angelo84

Tufts Class of 2011
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Jan 25, 2007
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I am not convinced on the cost of living being higher for Tufts. I pay 475 +utilites for my half of a two bedroom apartment with dishwasher, washer dryer. I would think cost of living would be higher in columbus.

I had run the numbers last year it seemed to be if I got instate at Ohio for second year it was even and if I didn't get residency then it was more expensive. I am instate at Tufts though which might have made the difference (15% off tuition).

As far as the curriculum you will learn about all species as tufts doesn't track. Ohio might have a larger case load for large animal but I don't have the numbers.

Also check out the Ohio vs Tufts thread in the vet forum although I have likely restated most of it here.

Obviously last year I went with Tufts and am happy with that choice.

Good luck with your decision.

I've seen this post with other schools, but once again, I am someone who accepted a position (at Ohio State University), and then received a call on Friday saying I was off the Tufts waiting list. I was all set and now I have no idea what to do again! Tufts was originally my number 1 school. Here's my pros and cons list, from what I can remember:

Tufts
pros:
-small class size (which can be both good and bad, in my opinion)
-I really liked the people there (faculty and students)...I felt really comfortable
-signature programs and behavioral aspect seem awesome
-my boyfriend likes the prospect of attending grad school in Mass.
-closer to home in Northern NJ

cons:
-more expensive than Ohio, if I can definitely get in-state residency
-a little far from Boston, which is more a con for my boyfriend who wants to work and go to school there
-cost of living seems higher than Columbus
-I've heard the large animal program isn't as good as Ohio's (if anyone can explain how so, or dispute this, I'd appreciate it)
-facilities seemed a little outdated; lecture halls seemed like they might be uncomfortable?

Ohio
pros
-less expensive than Tufts (by ~$30,000 total) if I got in-state residency
-apartments seem cheap!
-facilities seemed very nice

cons
-9-10 hour drive from NJ
-apprehensive that everyone at the school will be like my interviewers (not the friendliest people)
-larger class size (again, both good and bad)

I'm sure I had more pros and cons for each, but my mind is fuzzy at this point in the day. To be honest, Ohio was my first interview and I thought I did horribly, so I think I blocked out most of the tour! By the time I got to Tufts, I was more experienced with the interview process, so that might explain why I was more comfortable.

In an ideal world, I would take the people from Tufts, put them in OSU's school, move it all to Massachusetts, and make it the cost of OSU's in-state tuition. Help! I have until Saturday to decide!:confused:
 

twelvetigers

stabby cat
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If you want to be systematic and the +1, -1 dosn't work out, try rating the importance of different aspects (cost, location, boyfriend stuff, area of interest, etc.) and try to choose a school based on that.
 

whitefang2012

Iowa State CVM '12
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Apr 18, 2008
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I also checked out Tufts and really liked it (from CT and the drive is 2 hours though so im kinda from the area...plus my best friend and cousin and lots of other people i know are in boston so im biased). My experience in Ohio during the interview was completely opposite (the worst interview...by far and not even my first). However, the person showing me around was really nice and attentive...so i am guessing the people in the school are not the same.

Just my 2 cents...
 

PlantersPunch

Tufts c/o 2012!
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Obviously I'm biased as I am going to Tufts this fall, but I'm going for large animal/mostly equine with an open mind. This is the reason I chose Tufts, I don't want to track because although I'm pulled towards equine, I would like to be able to do it all without a huge throw down if I change my mind in the middle of vet school.

As far as the better program in large animal at Ohio, I think you can make the program as good as you want it to be. I plan on using selectives/clinical rotations/vacations to spend as much time as I can with the best large animal/equine veterinarians I can get my hands on.

Anyways, I'm going to stop now because I'm pretty sure this is very soon (if it hasn't already) going to turn into a bid to get you to go to Tufts haha!

Good luck! Maybe I'll see you in the fall!!:D
 

amberspyglass

Penn Vet 2012
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I think the reason Tufts may not have a good reputation in large animal is the surroundings and thus the caseload. Tufts is not situated in an area where you are going to get a lot of dairy or beef work. They DO however have a great equine and small ruminant caseload, as I understand. Because of the availability of cases, it may not attract veterinarians with special interest or expertise in dairy/beef and you may not have as much opportunity, or you may need to work harder, to get good experience with dairy/beef. So, I think you need to decide how important dairy or beef is to your large animal experience...if you are looking at small ruminant or equine, I think Tufts is still a great choice.
 

dvm'08

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go with the cheapest option. they're both good schools, and the educational difference will be negligible in the end.
 

VAgirl

UC Davis SVM c/o 2012
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go with the cheapest option. they're both good schools, and the educational difference will be negligible in the end.
Is it just me, or does it seem like most people say this but few do it? I know it seems like sound advice to me and yet it's not what I'm doing. I'm fortunate that my cost differential between what I chose and my cheapest option was maybe only +/- $10K, but still.

(Not saying you didn't do take this advice yourself, dvm'08, as I have no idea. It's just something I've been thinking for a while and your comment reminded me and promted me to post.)
 
OP
HarryMonster

HarryMonster

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Feb 16, 2008
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I think that liking the people is a big deal. That said, i'm guessing tha there ar lots of nice people from Ohio, you just had a bad sample. How important is staying close to family? How important is what your boyfriend would like? Could you afford the higher cost of living? Are you sure that residency is a good possibility at Tufts? Could you possibly go visit Ohio again? At least do a bit more research on the LA programs. Maybe some other people can offer more insight into the programs, as I have no idea about either one. Just listing things to consider, if you haven't already.

Good luck and they're both awesome schools!
I agree that I may not have had the best sample of people from Ohio. My tour guide was very nice, but seeing as I only really interacted with her and the two interviewers, it left me with a bad feeling. But with 140 students in each class, I'm sure I'd find people to get along with! Going back to the residency issue, I meant establishing residency in Ohio would be cheaper. I don't think that possibility lies with Tufts. Unfortunately, I don't have time to go back to Ohio! I wish I could. Either way I know I would be going to an excellent school. I feel like a brat for making such a big deal about it!
 

cateyes

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Mar 22, 2008
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Don't feel bad!! You're going to be spending the next four years of your life wherever you choose to go, so it's worth the time and research you're putting into this decision.
As a side note, (and I'm biased b/c I loved OSU) all of the people that I met were amazingly nice there. My interviewers were really friendly and very pro me going there, and all of the students that I spoke to were great- helpful/informative and very outgoing/welcoming.

Even the cleaning staff and the woman that ran the cafe in the VMAB wished me luck and told me they were keeping their fingers crossed for me :love:

Maybe it was just your interviewers?

Good luck with your decision, and keep us updated with the school that you choose. I'd love to have you in my class next year though!
 

chris03333

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Is it just me, or does it seem like most people say this but few do it? I know it seems like sound advice to me and yet it's not what I'm doing. I'm fortunate that my cost differential between what I chose and my cheapest option was maybe only +/- $10K, but still.
That is because "most people" who say that are postgrad. Hind sight is very very different (especially when you are paying back the loans for going to the more expensive school:eek:)

But I cannot be bitter because I did not listen to those people when I chose my school either:laugh:
 

dvm'08

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Is it just me, or does it seem like most people say this but few do it? I know it seems like sound advice to me and yet it's not what I'm doing. I'm fortunate that my cost differential between what I chose and my cheapest option was maybe only +/- $10K, but still.

(Not saying you didn't do take this advice yourself, dvm'08, as I have no idea. It's just something I've been thinking for a while and your comment reminded me and promted me to post.)
You're right - i dont think many people actually listen to this advice...

I was accepted to a bunch of schools, and ultimately took my in state school... so i sorta did take the cheapest option.

I really do believe that all the vet schools in the US and Canada provide students with roughly equivalent undergrad DVM education, and its what you do post-grad that augments your basic knowledge... so paying a whole bunch more, and not getting that much more out of it, seems counter intuitive to me.

PS.... today is my last day of vet school... ever!..... ahhhhhhh freedom.
 

cateyes

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Congratulations! You must be feeling so excited right now!
 

ri23

OSU CVM Class of 2011
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You really cannot judge a school based on 3 people you met there. A fair number of Ohio's interviewers are not even faculty at the school, many are veterinarians throughout Ohio. Some of them can definitely be intimidating during the interview, but that is really just to try and get honest answers and see how you do in stressful situations. Generally, the midwest is known for very friendly people.

As for rent, you are correct, it really isn't at all bad. Ohio also does not track, allowing you to get an education to become a well-rounded veterinarian. While I think it was mentioned that there is more early hands-on experiences at Tufts and not Ohio, I don't believe this to be true. Ohio has many opportunities to work (and get paid) doing small and large animal emergency, equine ICU, and milking team etc., in order to get experience working with different animals.

As for the class size, 140 is really not that large. I would say that I know the majority of my class, and from what I've seen the smaller the groups - the more gossip. By having more options, you are more likely to find people that you fit in with.

Another great aspect of Ohio are the facilities. We have nice, clean academic facilities and comprehensive medical facilities. Also, the caseload at Ohio is one of, if not the, highest - giving ample opportunities during school.
 
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HarryMonster

HarryMonster

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You really cannot judge a school based on 3 people you met there. A fair number of Ohio's interviewers are not even faculty at the school, many are veterinarians throughout Ohio. Some of them can definitely be intimidating during the interview, but that is really just to try and get honest answers and see how you do in stressful situations. Generally, the midwest is known for very friendly people.

As for rent, you are correct, it really isn't at all bad. Ohio also does not track, allowing you to get an education to become a well-rounded veterinarian. While I think it was mentioned that there is more early hands-on experiences at Tufts and not Ohio, I don't believe this to be true. Ohio has many opportunities to work (and get paid) doing small and large animal emergency, equine ICU, and milking team etc., in order to get experience working with different animals.

As for the class size, 140 is really not that large. I would say that I know the majority of my class, and from what I've seen the smaller the groups - the more gossip. By having more options, you are more likely to find people that you fit in with.

Another great aspect of Ohio are the facilities. We have nice, clean academic facilities and comprehensive medical facilities. Also, the caseload at Ohio is one of, if not the, highest - giving ample opportunities during school.
My interviewers work at the school, and I figured they were intentionally trying to be intimidating. I've heard other things from other people who have interviewed in favor of their Ohio interviewers, but you know...first impressions.:rolleyes:

The larger class size, as I mentioned, can be both good and bad. I did take into account that with mostly girls, a class of 80 could get cliquey. Not that a class of 140 wouldn't, but there are more people to learn about and get to know.

I really liked Ohio's facilities!
 

phoenix19

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I'm sorry I didn't see this thread sooner, so I don't know which school you chose...but I did notice the greyhound in your pic, and OSU does some really cool stuff with this breed (blood bank, special research, teaming up w/ adoption agencies...). So if that's something you're interested in, it might be another plus for Ohio State--but I'm sure if Tufts doesn't have anything with greyhounds, you could start it up! I can give you some more info on OSU's greyhound programs if you're interested.
 

ri23

OSU CVM Class of 2011
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I'm sorry I didn't see this thread sooner, so I don't know which school you chose...but I did notice the greyhound in your pic, and OSU does some really cool stuff with this breed (blood bank, special research, teaming up w/ adoption agencies...). So if that's something you're interested in, it might be another plus for Ohio State--but I'm sure if Tufts doesn't have anything with greyhounds, you could start it up! I can give you some more info on OSU's greyhound programs if you're interested.
This is very true. Dr. Couto does very extensive cancer and other research with greyhounds - and he is well known for it.