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Jefferson, Robert Wood, NYMC Where should I go?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by 2010orBust, Apr 18, 2007.

  1. 2010orBust

    2010orBust Junior Member 7+ Year Member

    25
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    Dec 17, 2005
    I need to pick a medical school but they all seem pretty even to me. Anyone have any input on whether I should pick Jefferson, Robert Wood Johnson, or NYMC
     
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  3. FenderHM

    FenderHM Where there's a will... 7+ Year Member

    573
    1
    Feb 19, 2006
    if you like NYC and independent learning, and dont mind living in s secluded quite suburb for at least 2 maybe 4 years, then roll on out to NYMC!
     
  4. drc243

    drc243 New Member 2+ Year Member

    119
    1
    Apr 23, 2006
    If you are a nj resident then the decision is simple. Go to rwj and save yourself 70,000 dollars. I do think that robert woods johnson and jefferson are equivalent schools and that nymc is a notch below the other two.

    Best,
    Dave
     
  5. LatinaDr1984

    LatinaDr1984 2+ Year Member

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    0
    Feb 7, 2007
    MDApps:
    Hey there!

    If you feel that they are equally good then I would say

    1. Go with where you feel most comforrtable and where you see yourself fitting in well with the students and faculty..

    2. The cheaper school.. Im a NY resident and Ive been told that they make it SUPER easy to get instate tuition.. which is 22,000/yr.. and thats nice!

    But good luck with your decision.. Im sure whereever you choose you will do Great!:luck:
     
  6. eternalrage

    eternalrage Even Kal has bad days... 10+ Year Member

    3,653
    9
    Jun 22, 2005
    Long Island, NY
    Do you have any interest in MD/MPH? Jefferson's got a great program.

    Otherwise, I'd say RWJ if you are NJ resident. ONe of my good friends got in there, he's cool so there's a + for going to RWJ.
     
  7. Orthodoc40

    Orthodoc40 7+ Year Member

    Jefferson!
     
  8. lina123321

    lina123321 ralph: im a unitard 5+ Year Member

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    Jun 20, 2006
    over the rainbow
    nymc...
     
  9. LunaMD

    LunaMD 2+ Year Member

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    Dec 30, 2006
    New Jersey
    I vote for Robert Wood. Not only is it a great school with a top 15 teaching hospital and a cutting edge research department, its so much cheaper than the other two!
     
  10. thedelicatessen

    thedelicatessen In Memory of Riley Jane Moderator Emeritus 5+ Year Member

    560
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    Jan 23, 2006
    If you're not a NJ resident, I would pick Jefferson over NYMC. Jefferson has the better academic reputation, and their students seemed more enthusiastic about their school than the students at NYMC who seemed to have picked their school only because they had limited options. Good luck!
     
  11. lina123321

    lina123321 ralph: im a unitard 5+ Year Member

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    Jun 20, 2006
    over the rainbow
    i forgot to add, if u go to nymc, maybe u can make a funny music/med school video like this one:
    [YOUTUBE]ojjUGE2BH_E[/YOUTUBE]
     
  12. 2010orBust

    2010orBust Junior Member 7+ Year Member

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    Dec 17, 2005
    I am a NJ resident but is there really any difference between Jefferson and Robert Wood? Where can I find rankings and ratings?
     
  13. 2010orBust

    2010orBust Junior Member 7+ Year Member

    25
    0
    Dec 17, 2005
    I am an NJ resident but is there really any difference between Jefferson and Robert Wood? Where can I find rankings and ratings?
     
  14. riceman04

    riceman04 10+ Year Member

    8,506
    1
    Mar 21, 2005
    Los Angeles
    9. Robert Wood Johnson#_________
    First Year Student Budget: In state: $43,048, Out of state: $55,130 Score: 2
    Financial Aid/etc…: 83% students receive financial aid, average amount per scholarship/grant: $4,885, Average 2005 graduate indebtedness: $102,414….all nice but keep in mind that indebtedness might be lower due to in-state students having lower tuition, two primary university run loans along with other significant state funded loans…and then of course there are your govt. loans. Score: 4.75
    Curriculum/etc…: The “ASK” curriculum…significant early introduction to patient care (more in depth than at some other schools), traditional basic science classes for first two years integrated with PBL/case based learning (ok good), along with initial elective classes that focus on presenting environmental and community medicine (cool)…also have intro to epidemiology and biostatistics (good), electives continue in second year where have shift to pathology of body, for first two years have a “Basic Life Support” course that prepares students to be the first responders in cardiac emergencies, to recognize early signs of heart attack, stroke, management of victim suffering the attack, to use CRP and bag-valve-mask devices, and the external automated defibrillator (niiiiiiiiiiiiiiice), Non-credit electives also offered during the lunch hour (cool)…opportunities for self-directed learning. Clerkships: Family Medicine w/ underserved population (6 weeks)…nice, Medicine (8 weeks), OB/GYN, Pediatrics, Psychiatry (6 weeks), Surgery (8 weeks), Intro to Clerkship Experience (1 week)…nice, electives, Advanced Clerkship in Ambulatory Medicine, Advanced Clerkship in Surgery, Neurology, and 16 weeks of approved electives for the fourth year…to include numerous opportunities to do clerkships abroad, finally have a longitudinal primary care experience and an independent project. Have and Observed Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE), and a Clinical Skills Center (niiiiice) Research/Thesis is optional (can be done as part of the Distinction in Research Program) Grading Scale: 5 intervals for all years (ABCDF or equivalent) Score: 14.5
    #Affiliated Hospitals/Facilities: 6 primary hospitals, but total affiliations approx. 26…several supporting facilities including specialized clinical facilities (like cancer center, imaging center, etc…) Score: 9
    Selection Factors: Rolling admissions w/ state preference given to in-state students (83% of class from in-state….yikes), but URM’s highly encouraged to apply (I am still skeptical though). 2815 applications for 589 interviews (most of which are given to in-state residents……boooo). Avg. overall GPA: 3.62, Avg. Science GPA: 3.57, Overall Median GPA: 3.68, Science Median GPA: 3.66, Avg. MCAT: 30.2 (V:9.4, P: 10.2, B: 10.6), Median MCAT: 32Q (Ranges: V: 4 – 13, P: 6 – 14, B: 6 – 15, writing: L – T). That state pref sucks!!!!!! (booooooooooooooooo) Score: -2 (all b/c of state pref)
    Diversity: 14% URM, 49% Minority Score: 12.25
    Dual Degree Options: MD/MBA, MD/MPH, MD/PhD, MD/MS (for 2 diff masters programs) Score: 7+++++++
    Student Support: established Office of Multicultural Affairs that supports/sponsors several cultural events throughout the school year and summer, have counseling office (typical) and a Cognitive Skills Program (teaches study strategies, helps to target methods for increasing efficiency and effectiveness, peer mentors and faculty advisors, several student run organizations, Health Sciences library, Clinical Skills Center Score: 6.25
    Housing: no on campus of off campus affiliated (booo). Orientation Committee tries to partially compensate for this by hosting two “Housing Days” during the summer. Score: 1
    Location: Camden and Piscateway (hahahahahaha…..the Compton of the east coast), diverse patient population at affiliated hospitals. Jersey has similar climate to Philly! So I guess I can live with that. It is in the city…so I guess it is ok Score: 3.5
    Class Size: 157, so at least 27% of interviewees (but I am sure this number is much higher b/c med schools over accept all the time)
    Score: 3.75
    Residency Match List: 48% enter primary care residency programs, 52% enter the more specialized programs
    Volunteer/ Research Opportunities: several med school sponsored outreach programs (like HIPHOP…nice) and community education programs…all of that in addition to several volunteer initiatives run solely by student organizations (awesome…this school is very community oriented), Research: several specialized institutes (including a stem cell institute….uh ohhh…nice), provides workshops on how to submit a research grant application to the NIH and other federal sponsors, Summer Research Fellowship Opportunity; Total NIH Funding: $54,475,050 (Rank: 66th), NIH Science Research funding: $52,651,409 Score: 10.5 (wow…RWJUMDNJ impressed me…too bad I am not an resident)
    Miscellaneous: They have a linkage program with UPenn Special Science…that is my saving grace, surprisingly great program, very community oriented, surprisingly awesome program (I know I said that already…lol). I now have a legitimate contact in the Office of Multicultural Affairs…this alone may make me apply Score: 3+++++++++

    Total Score: NO FULL SCORE ASSIGNED UNTIL ALL SCHOOLS COMPLETED…HELPS PREVENT ANY POSSIBLE INLETS FOR BIAS
     
  15. riceman04

    riceman04 10+ Year Member

    8,506
    1
    Mar 21, 2005
    Los Angeles
    22. New York Medical College*______________
    First Year Student Budget: $59,804 Score: -1
    Financial Aid/etc…: have both need based and non-need based loans…you also have access to that New York Regents scholarship (the one described above…probably available through all NY schools)…no listed scholarships supported by the school’s endowment…possibly an alumni scholarship….% of students receiving financial aid: 87%, Average Amount per scholarship/grant: $13,025, Average 2005 graduate indebtedness: $156,756…now I see why people from here leave with so much debt Score: 3.25
    Curriculum/etc…: Basic science curriculum (for first two years) that supplemented with clinical correlation sessions (small group…the sessions are added for each basic science course to show the clinical correlation…that’s cool…to me that is almost like case-based learning…this makes everything relevant). Second year is primarily composed of PBL with small group discussions ( I think this setup is appropriate b/c you already have the basic tools necessary to be able to apply what has been learned to complex situations; a clinical skills course is also taught in the second year…meant to facilitate the mastering of communication and physical diagnosis skills. Early patient contact with preceptors (through the “Introduction to Primary Care Medicine” begins in the first year (so this clinical skills course just reinforces the initial exposure….nice NYMC). There are school supported summer research fellowships btwn. first and second year (that’s nice). Clerkships: 3rd yr: Medicine (12 weeks), Surgery (8 weeks), Pediatrics (8weeks), OB/GYN (6 weeks), Psychiatry (6 weeks), Neurology (4 weeks), Family Medicine (4 weeks), Community and Preventative Medicine (2 weeks); 4th year: medical or pediatric subinternship (4 weeks), surgical subspecialties (4 weeks), geriatrics (4 weeks), anesthesiology (1 week), rehabilitation medicine (1 week), and 28 weeks of electives which are decided with the help of an advisor…many students use this time to do international clerkships and/or away rotations; Comprehensive seven-station multispecialty OSCE required for graduation; integrated four-year curriculum in Biomedical Ethics. Distance learning center meant to support student learning (but no simulation labs, dolls, etc…). Grading System: 4 intervals (Honors/High Pass/Pass/Fail or equivalent) for everything except for the anesthesiology and rehab. medicine & Biomed. ethics course (they are graded on 2 interval scale…Pass/Fail)…no mention clinical skill center Score: 13
    #Affiliated Hospitals/Facilities: 20 + a couple of specialized facilities (2 of these hospitals are actually university run…that’s cool) Score: 9++++++++++
    Selection Factors: Private, Rolling, no known state preference, Avg. GPA: not listed, Median Overall GPA: 3.6, Median Science GPA: 3.53 (good), Median MCAT: 31Q (Ranges: V: 6 – 15, P: 7 – 14, B: 8 – 15, writing: L – T). 8877 applications for 1394 interview slots, likes non-traditional students (supposedly) Score: 7
    Diversity: 4% URM (I so hope that figure is wrong), 48% minority Score: -13.5
    Dual Degree Options: MD/MPH, MD/PhD Score: 3.5
    Student Support: Office of minority affairs very established…seems very supportive…offers tutorial services, career counseling, personal guidance, financial guidance, no SNMA…they cannot have a chapter here b/c the Afr. Amer. Population is too small. Newly expanded health science library...looks very modernized and open. NYMC has a variety of student run organizations (that’s cool)…including one for married couples (I told you they like more non-trads…that’s me assuming that the people who are married are older; active student affairs office that sponsors several events during the year and summer, faculty advising/mentoring, peer group mentoring. Score: 6
    Housing: ample on campus housing available for all 4 yrs. However, most MS-III’s and MS-IV’s stay in NYC, off-campus affiliated available, there are also several apartments immediately surrounding the school Score: 6
    Location: Valhalla, New York…I like the fact that it is outside the majority of the hustle and bustle of NYC. It is much more open and tree-lined. You still are exposed to a very diverse patient population b/c you are not far outside of the city and is close enough to areas where you will see all sorts of health related issues….pretty nice (this is one of the only things it has going for it….hahaha) Score: 5
    Class Size: 186…so 13.3% of the interviewees matriculate…a much larger percentage are admitted…I hear a lot of people turn them down if they have other choices simply b/c of the fact that this place is very expensive (and also b/c it is not ranked very high…whatever…lol) Score: 5
    Residency Match List: 48% of past graduates have entered primary care residency programs, 52% have entered specialized residency programs
    Volunteer/Research Opportunities: Several volunteer opportunities organized by student organizations along with independent volunteer organizations (those that are in the city)…no mention of school sponsored community outreach programs/initiatives…the student volunteer organizations, however, do play a significant role in the community. Research: NYMC’s research strengths lie in cardiovascular disease, cancer, kidney disease, infectious disease, and neuroscience…Maybe this is a testament to their modernized facilities: Biotech. companies use some of NYMC’s facilities to conduct their own drug research. NYMC has a good number of (how vague is that!!!! Lol!!) specialized institutes/centers and sponsors a couple programs. I will say that their research resources are growing steadily (as of late). A list maintained for current short-term research positions available to students. Summer research fellowships available…a major list of funding opportunities is available (includes NIH and HHMI…that’s cool). This is the only major conglomeration of research facilities between NYC and Albany (oooooooooo that’s is supposed to be real nice…hahahahaha…the fact that they even include that on their website means, to me, that they are searching for anything to make them look better than they are…I don’t mean to take anything away from the schools accomplishments, but that statement is pointless…but maybe I am missing something). Total NIH funding: $22,403,655 (rank: 88th), Total NIH research funding: $22,403,655….hahahahahaha…all of their funding from NIH went towards research Score: 7.5
    Miscellaneous: This school is lucky that my Rice premed advisor holds this school so highly. Otherwise this school would not make the cut. Do I think this is a bad school? Of course not, but there are a lot of things that I do not understand…such as the low % of URM’s attending the school. Would I attend this school? Of course I would…I would just have to make sure that somehow the minority scene is better recognized nationally (hahahaha I’m speaking as if I can change the world…well who knows). They do have a pretty good website…nice pictures (hahahaha)…they are not secretive like PITT (how lame is that!!!!). So since these are my bias points…and since I went into this investigation thinking that it would make me love NYMC even more than I did…I am going to give pity points….hahahahahaha Score: 3

    Total Score: NO FULL SCORE ASSIGNED UNTIL ALL SCHOOLS COMPLETED…HELPS PREVENT ANY POSSIBLE INLETS FOR BIAS
     
  16. riceman04

    riceman04 10+ Year Member

    8,506
    1
    Mar 21, 2005
    Los Angeles
    37. Jefferson_____________
    First Year Student Budget: $61,992 (hahahahahahahaha) Score: -1
    Financial Aid/etc…: Well I can say that this school is very expensive…and thus students need a good financial aid package…several loans (both federal and private loans) are available to the medical students…most of the loans are low interest… most of the loan funds under Jefferson umbrella have random preferences attached (i.e state preferences, family organizations preferences, etc…). A number of need based and merit based scholarships offered through associated scholarship funds (once again there are many limitations attached to each fund). % of enrolled students receiving financial aid: 87%, Average Amount per Scholarship/Grant: $10,081, Average 2005 Graduate Indebtedness: $137,171 Score: 3.75
    Curriculum/etc…: Slightly integrated curriculum where primarily traditional methods for presenting topics are utilized…traditional organ-based lectures for coursework in gross anatomy, cell biology and microscopic anatomy, biochemistry, genetics, neuroscience, and physiology provides first-year students with a strong basic science foundation. Practice related topics such as medical informatics, evidence-based medicine, health policy and ethics are also introduced during the first year…Specifically, curriculum for first two years is broken down into blocks: First year: Block I covers Human form and Development…basically human anatomy and related topics including imaging (MRI, CT, X-Ray, etc…). A total of eight clinical skills sessions are incorporated into this block, which serve to reinforce the concepts gleaned from lecture and dissection. These sessions are interspersed, where relevant, throughout the various regions as the course progresses….several peer-teaching and peer-review sessions during the dissection module. These sessions are covered in the “Introduction to Clinical Medicine” course. Block II: covers the Molecular and Cellular Basis of Medicine…it is during this block where PBL/case-based learning is incorporated…still also have traditional lectures. Blocks III & IV: Sytems I and Systems II: Neuroscience” respectively…Teaching is done by lecture, video demonstrations, small group digital microscopy labs, computer simulations, problem-solving sessions and EKG laboratory sessions, and small group lectures. During second year there is obviously greater focus on clinical sciences…greater focus on PBL/case-based learning…so basically the school ensures that you have a significant basic plug and chug foundation before progressing towards greater application of concepts (I like that organization)….2nd year blocks: Block I: Foundations of Pathology/Pharmacology; Immunity, Infection, and Disease; Introduction to Clinical Medicine II…as part of this clin. Med II class have an incorporation of “Standard Patient” interviews…these interviews are conducted and videotaped with feedback on interviewing skills…Block II: Foundations of Clinical Medicine, Clinical Skills, Introduction to Clinical Medicine II. Clinical Skills Course: provided a foundation for physical examination maneuvers and findings. It includes an introductory series of lectures in the followed by system-specific lectures which are integrated into the Foundation of Clinical Medicine course. Didactic sessions include the use of individual wireless stethophones for the teaching of cardiac and pulmonary sounds, and “hands-on” experiences at the Jefferson Clinical Skills Center with standardized patients and simulations. There is also a series of supervised encounters with hospitalized patients at TJUH and at local clinical affiliates. Third Year Clerkships: Internal Medicine (12 weeks), Pediatrics (6 weeks), Psychiatry and Human Behavior (6 weeks), Family Medicine (6 weeks), OB/GYN (6 weeks), General Surgery (6 weeks), Electives (cool…6 weeks); Fourth Year Clerkships: Neurology/Rehabilitation Medicine (4 weeks), Surgical Subspecialties (6 weeks), Inpatient Sub-internships (4 weeks), Outpatient Sub-internships (4 weeks), Advanced Basic Science/Scientific Foundations of Medicine (4 weeks): course that revisits the interplay btwn basic sciences and clinical medicine. Six clinical topics in different disciplines will each be reviewed for one or two days using varied educational styles. In addition, the course will feature “teaching how to teach“ with weekly interactive seminars. A weekly journal club will highlight critical reading skills with articles related to the topics being presented that week (very cool); Emergency Medicine/Advanced Clinical Skills (4 weeks), Electives (16 weeks)…awesome…many students use this time to do away rotations (national and international) or more independent research (advanced studies). Overall the curriculum is designed to model the biopyschosocial model of health and clinical skills (pretty cool). Curricular innovations: Learning Resource Center (part of AISR…Academic & Instructional Support & Resources) very modernized, high-tech center developed to enhance student learning; Specifics: Audiovisual and Computer-based instructional materials and equipment, Simulation labs (Harvey and SimMan mannequins)…allows students to experience in taking vitals, using specific measuring instruments (EKG..etc), and in performing specific medical operations/functions. There are many other simulators available for use…for e.g. Cervical dilation and effacement simulator, advanced birthing simulator, birth station simulator, episiotomy suturing simulator, IV arms/hand simulators for venipuncture, Pediatric and adult lumbar puncture simulator, Nurse training dolls/CPR dolls, Ear examination simulator, Male/female urinary catheterization models, Central line insertion simulators, etc… (niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiice..but I am sure other schools with clinical skills centers have just as large a collection of simulators); Models and online videos (this school is no joke)…Grading Intervals: Required Basic Sciences: 3 intervals (Honors/Pass/Fail), Basic Science Electives: 2 intervals (Pass/Fail), Required & Elective Clinical Clerkships: 5 intervals (High Honors/Excellent/Good/Marginal Competence/Fail)…all surgical selective grading utilizes 3 intervals (Honors/Pass/Fail) Score: 15++++++++++++++++++++++
    #Affiliated Hospitals/Facilities: 19 + supporting facilities Score: 9++++++++++++++++++++++
    Selection Factors: Private, Rolling admissions; Technically, it functions as Delaware’s state medical school. Thus it saves a percentage of seats for Delaware residents (but not a very large percentage like Baylor saves for Texas residents). Avg. GPA: 3.5, Avg. Science GPA: 3.5, Overall Median GPA: 3.62, Science Median GPA: 3.57; Avg. MCAT: 31 (Breakdown: P: 10.3, V: 10.2, B: 10.5), Median MCAT: 31Q…Breakdown: P: 10, V: 10, B: 11…(Ranges: P: 7 – 15, V: 8 – 15, B: 8 – 15)…School says that you must have higher than an 8 in each section. 7613 total applications for 771 interview slots, strong commitment to increasing URM representation (so they say!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!), they like non-traditional students, seem to have strong link with Penn program. Ex-adcom member now an advisor here at Penn. Score: 7
    Diversity: 8% URM (what a joke…same as my alma mater), 27% minority...not diverse at all!!!!!!!!! Score: 5.75
    Dual Degree Options: MD/MBA-MHA (cool), MD/MPH, MD/PhD Score: 5.75
    Student Support: Very prominent Office of Diversity and Minority Affairs (ODAMA)…strongest one I have seen on paper in a while…The ODAMA mission: 1. To define acceptable conduct for a “multi-cultural” Jefferson Community, 2. To strengthen existing diversity and to increase its scope, and 3. To increase communication among the various groups around campus and the community at large…this office sponsors a number of campus-wide events and community initiatives (multicultural community initiatives); sponsors minority mentoring and role modeling programs; sponsors minority alumni dinner and recognition/awards ceremony…Office functions as organizer of the “Language of Medicine Program-Language Immersion Program in Medicine…i.e. study abroad opportunity (ODAMA Med Lip)…ODAMA also has organized a lecture series: A four part lecture series will be implemented to address culturally competent care in the following areas: Minority Healthcare/Healthcare Disparities, Treating individuals with disabilities, Alternative Medicine, and Women’s Health. Over 100 different student groups…a very diverse selection….ranging from honor societies to student interest groups to just chill groups (hahahahaha). Very organized SNMA (though very small). Organized student affairs and career counseling office…houses the “Student Personal Counseling Center”…student affairs office organizes specific programs, including AOA tutoring services and the “Big Sib Program”, which is specifically introduced to students who are experiencing academic difficulty. Career guidance available through various designated mentors, career advisors, and academic advisors…they help 4th year med student structure their curriculum to parallel their interests….Wellness office (which every school has) Activities office: coordinates social, cultural, and recreational programs for the entire Jefferson community. School has one main library (Scott Library…the building on Walnut I always thought was the main medical building) with many resources….computer assisted learning labs, models, etc… Curricular support: clinical skills center (simulation labs…they are awesome), AISR, standardized patients, online network that gives students access to online resources (JEFFLINE and Pulse). Overall, it seems like this school offers its students a lot of support Score: 7
    Housing: Several options for on-campus housing…the apartments are pretty nice…just kind of small…housing in center city is overpriced…there are some seriously crappy buildings in that area that they advertise as “historic” and preserved…should be advertised as overpriced and rickety…there are some off campus properties that are more reasonable…but they are not the closest to campus. Score: 4.5
    Location: Philadelphia, PA…great location to gain experience working with a diverse patient population. The school is in the middle of downtown…Philly weather…comparable crime to that around Penn (maybe a little less b/c Penn borders the volatile West Philly). Philly has a lot of culture…good city to enjoy the younger years Score: 5
    Class Size: 254 so approximately 33% of interviewees matriculate (means that a larger % are accepted) Score: 5++++++++++++
    Residency Match List: 38% of past graduates entered primary care residency programs, the other 62% enter non-primary residency programs.
    Volunteer/Research Opportunities: School takes pride in the amount of community outreach in which it (as a whole) and its students are engaged. Examples of community outreach programs sponsored by the med. school: Jeff HOPE, Jeff Kids, Jeff Y.E.S., Jeff MOMS, Jeff ABROAD (Jefferson is an active US affiliate of the International Federation of Medical Student Associations…IFMSA-USA)…gives students many opportunities for abroad service experiences (in addition to rotations), etc…There are also community specific initiatives sponsored directly by the Office of Diversity and Minority Affairs, such as the “Urban Education Program”, “Clinical /Educational Outreach Program”…the office also sponsors specific minority education/enrichment programs, such as the “Future Docs Program” (for high school students)...There are several student-run organizations that also sponsor individual community service projects around the city…Overall, the student body is very involved in the community!...Research: Many formal and informal research opportunities for students interested in exposure to clinical and/or basic science biomedical research. Formal Summer Research Programs: 3 formal 10-week federally funded research programs in translational cancer, basic cancer, and heart, lung, and blood research…stipends provided as part of the programs (in addition to funding)…students work towards creating a poster presentation for future presentation. There are also several other Jefferson supported (or Jeff affiliate supported) research programs (I must emphasize that Jeff for some reason supports a lot of diff. research programs…we will see how much NIH funding this school actually receives) including programs in emergency medicine, neurology, family medicine, and general medicine. Jeff affiliate, Albert Einstein (I don’t think they are referring to the school up in NYC…they are referring to the med center in Philly), also offers an array of research opportunities (cool)…There are also many informal long-term and short-term research opportunities. Jefferson maintains a list of extramural research opportunities and funding resources also (nice, but seriously not that great). Research facilities/centers/institutues: Jefferson is well known for its ground breaking cancer research. The school maintains the Kimmel Cancer Center (founded in 1991), which is designated as a National Cancer Institute-designated CLINICAL (not basic science) cancer center. There are other centers and institutes on campus (but not as prominent). Overall there are not as many diff. research centers/institutes…but still great place to conduct research. Total NIH funding: $71,475,488 (ranked: 54th), Total NIH funding for research: $69,524,545. Score: 9
    Miscellaneous: This school is pretty awesome…I think it does not get the respect it deserves…Jefferson University Hospital is one of only a few hospitals in the United States that is both a Regional Trauma Center and a federally designated regional Spinal Cord Injury Center. Age Range: 18 to 35, Average Age: 23.7, 23% of first year class are age 25 and above…Maintains one of the 5 Offices of Health Policy in the United States….Currently the school is adding to its educational facilities…for e.g the school is adding a new clinical skills center, which will feature virtual diagnostic and surgical suites (awesome). Not a very diverse school…but I am hoping that they are truly working towards what they promote on their website…Dr. Hunter, however, does not give the school the best marks (mainly b/c of lack of diversity…..pretty good website…lots of supporting videos. Score: 3

    Total Score: NO FULL SCORE ASSIGNED UNTIL ALL SCHOOLS COMPLETED…HELPS PREVENT ANY POSSIBLE INLETS FOR BIAS
     
  17. tictaq

    tictaq Never Follow 7+ Year Member

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    0
    Apr 21, 2006
    that vid is pretty funny :laugh:
     
  18. 2010orBust

    2010orBust Junior Member 7+ Year Member

    25
    0
    Dec 17, 2005
    looks like NYMC is out

    between Jefferson and Robert Wood (leaning towards Robert Wood heavily)
     
  19. duke13

    duke13

    5
    0
    May 4, 2007
    What worries me about RWJ is the new pass/fail system that they are implementing this fall. I got accepted to RWJ, but am turning it down because I do not want to be a guinea pig in this upcoming transition year. I also worry that board scores will drop at RWJ because of the reduced motivation to study provided by the new grading system.

    I would definitely pick Jefferson if I were in your position.
     
  20. bubbachuck

    bubbachuck Fear denies faith 10+ Year Member

    249
    1
    Jul 10, 2005
    PA
    Never interviewed at Jefferson. i liked RWJ's facilities a lot. They have good collaboration with local pharmaceutical companies (NJ has top pharmaceutical industry). Their cancer center looks really nice too. plus Bart Kamen, the brother of the guy who invented the Segway, is chair of pediatric oncology there. he let me ride his segway.
     
  21. Tiki

    Tiki Girl named after a Giant 10+ Year Member

    955
    16
    Jan 6, 2004
    East Coast
    I don't see why there would be much of a transition. The classes are staying the same, the exams are staying the same. The only thing that is changing is the grade on your transcripts. And if you had been a student at RWJ previously, you'd be damn happy about the change in grading. We've been working hard to get it this way for sometime.

    As for the drop in board scores, that is ridiculous. Yale is pass/fail, do you think they have a drop in board scores? The USMLE is what you make of it, you have to do the work. The school has absolutely nothing to do with it. If you don't have the motivation to work hard, whether in a pass/fail system or a A/B/C/D/F system, then you won't do well on the boards.
     
  22. koennen

    koennen Lend Me An Ear 10+ Year Member

    593
    2
    Oct 30, 2006
    Philadelphia, PA
    Ummm ... Jefferson is also pass/fail.
     
  23. smq123

    smq123 John William Waterhouse Administrator Physician SDN Advisor 10+ Year Member

    13,190
    2,117
    Jan 9, 2006
    Not quite - Jefferson is Honors/Pass/Fail.

    Tiki is right, though - the curriculum isn't changing, just the grading system. And even with an A/B/C/F grading system, there were still lots of people who said "C = MD". It's up to you to stay motivated.
     
  24. koennen

    koennen Lend Me An Ear 10+ Year Member

    593
    2
    Oct 30, 2006
    Philadelphia, PA
    Oh please! Spare me the hypertechnical correction. At Jefferson, you either pass a course or you fail a course, with the additional possibility of earning honors if you pass with a in enough grade. Do you really think that an "honors/pass/fail" system would obviate Duke13's concern with a lack of "motivation?"
     
  25. smq123

    smq123 John William Waterhouse Administrator Physician SDN Advisor 10+ Year Member

    13,190
    2,117
    Jan 9, 2006
    Well, I clarified the grading system because, for me (and quite a few of my classmates) it makes a difference. I try a bit harder on the first few exams, just to see if I have any shot of making honors in that block. Some of my friends have had an 88% going into the final, and so they often try harder to get honors on the last exam. If we had a pass/fail system at Jefferson, they'd probably just take a 70% and relax a little bit. If Jefferson had a H/HP/P/F system, I'd probably freak out a bit more, but, as it is, I'm glad that there's no difference between an 89% and a 79%.

    On the allopathic board, a lot of people also make a distinction between H/P/F, saying that P/F is better and less stressful.

    Sorry if it came across as condescending. It was just that, in my experience as a JMC student, the possibility of getting honors makes a difference to me and my level of motivation.
     
  26. 2010orBust

    2010orBust Junior Member 7+ Year Member

    25
    0
    Dec 17, 2005
    I just got a scholarship to NYMC that would make it pretty much the same price as Robert Wood in state. Can someone give me an analogy of school reputations to undergrad colleges between Jefferson, Robert Wood, and NYMC? I saw on the previous posts that Jeff and Robert Wood are similar but "NYMC is a little below" What exactly does that mean? Thanks
     

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