Take my chances or go back home?

  • You can do this!

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Go back home!

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Just work

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Why is this even a question?

    Votes: 4 100.0%

  • Total voters
    4
May 14, 2016
4
0
Status
Pre-Medical
I've recently graduated with a low GPA (around 2.8, even lower sGPA); I understand my chances are slim.
So I thought that while I raise my GPA I would start my life away from home, work and take classes. I might be offered a job at an urgent care facility that I have been interning at, and have been accepted to take classes near that area. However, I have been concerned if this is a wise decision. In order to survive, I would need to work 30 hours a week. I would be taking two classes, but putting both class and study time together I would be pulling 60-65 hour week. My job would likely consume most of my time(12 hr shifts), and I'm afraid it will be at the cost of my GPA. If I want to be in medicine GPA needs to take priority, but this job might be a wonderful opportunity to gain experience in the medical field and possibly make me stronger in so many ways.
If you were in this position, what would you do? Should I take my chances and juggle job and school, or go back home, take classes, volunteer, and not worry about surviving? I appreciate any help.
 

Marrowist

Bone Boy
2+ Year Member
Jun 8, 2016
1,299
1,266
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
I am in that position and I do both every day. It consumes most of my life, but I enjoy it. It is a lesson in commitment and tenacity. Question for me is always, how bad do I want it?
 

bunchesonothing

Non-Trad on a Mission
Nov 12, 2015
610
663
Midwest
Status
Pre-Medical
I've recently graduated with a low GPA (around 2.8, even lower sGPA); I understand my chances are slim.
So I thought that while I raise my GPA I would start my life away from home, work and take classes. I might be offered a job at an urgent care facility that I have been interning at, and have been accepted to take classes near that area. However, I have been concerned if this is a wise decision. In order to survive, I would need to work 30 hours a week. I would be taking two classes, but putting both class and study time together I would be pulling 60-65 hour week. My job would likely consume most of my time(12 hr shifts), and I'm afraid it will be at the cost of my GPA. If I want to be in medicine GPA needs to take priority, but this job might be a wonderful opportunity to gain experience in the medical field and possibly make me stronger in so many ways.
If you were in this position, what would you do? Should I take my chances and juggle job and school, or go back home, take classes, volunteer, and not worry about surviving? I appreciate any help.
Are you saying that 2 classes and study time would be 60 hours a week alone?

I worked full time, 40 hour weeks, took 2 courses, sometimes 3 (depending how challenging the material was) at a school that worked on the quarter system... and did just fine. It's doable.
 

popopopop

7+ Year Member
Dec 18, 2011
1,415
869
DFW/Houston
Status
Medical Student
You already broken your gpa. What's your plan to get yourself out of that gpa hole before you even think about working? I'm saying this nicely, because 4.0 grades won't pop up without hardwork and reevaluating your studying habits. You can end it all now if you screw up classes further.
 
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OP
hundred-to-one shot
May 14, 2016
4
0
Status
Pre-Medical
Are you saying that 2 classes and study time would be 60 hours a week alone?

I worked full time, 40 hour weeks, took 2 courses, sometimes 3 (depending how challenging the material was) at a school that worked on the quarter system... and did just fine. It's doable.

Sorry, I was just saying job, class, and study would take 60 hours. A 60 hour week seems doable, but I just wanted some other opinions. How did you manage? You said it was doable, but was it at your breaking point? Did you feel yourself burnt out, or do you think this made you stronger? (this goes to Marrowist as well)
 

Marrowist

Bone Boy
2+ Year Member
Jun 8, 2016
1,299
1,266
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
Just shows me that I am capable of anything that I put my mind to. Medical school and all that comes after will be much more difficult than this.
 
OP
hundred-to-one shot
May 14, 2016
4
0
Status
Pre-Medical
You already broken your gpa. What's your plan to get yourself out of that gpa hole before you even think about working? I'm saying this nicely, because 4.0 grades won't pop up without hardwork and reevaluating your studying habits. You can end it all now if you screw up classes further.
That's exactly my fear. My plan was to retake the classes that I got below a B- in, maybe take a micro or immunology class, and then maybe go for a grad program as I start my application cycle (I will most likely go DO route). I don't want to make the mistake of biting off more than I can chew and totally screw any chance I have of med school. However, if I can't do this, will that mean that Med school would be more than I can handle?
 

popopopop

7+ Year Member
Dec 18, 2011
1,415
869
DFW/Houston
Status
Medical Student
That's exactly my fear. My plan was to retake the classes that I got below a B- in, maybe take a micro or immunology class, and then maybe go for a grad program as I start my application cycle (I will most likely go DO route). I don't want to make the mistake of biting off more than I can chew and totally screw any chance I have of med school. However, if I can't do this, will that mean that Med school would be more than I can handle?
I understand how you feel. Retake all your Cs if possible and apply DO. Graduate GPA won't help your app much without a higher undergrad GPA. I would only work right now if you absolutely need money. You might be in it for the long haul if you take that job. If it's a dream job, take it and maybe retake ONE class then continue from there. In the mean time, read books on how to study, seek help from professors or your smart friends and see what they're doing and get some critiques if possible.
 
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bunchesonothing

Non-Trad on a Mission
Nov 12, 2015
610
663
Midwest
Status
Pre-Medical
Sorry, I was just saying job, class, and study would take 60 hours. A 60 hour week seems doable, but I just wanted some other opinions. How did you manage? You said it was doable, but was it at your breaking point? Did you feel yourself burnt out, or do you think this made you stronger? (this goes to Marrowist as well)
Honestly, it was harder at the beginning. It was like a shock to the system at first. It did get better. I feel like I became super resilient. My skills improved. Obviously time management. Learn what works for you as a student, even if it's not what works for others. Make sure you have a good support system at your school and in the rest of your life. If you have a significant other, they need to understand/come to terms with the potential craziness that is about to ensue. If they don't, this can become a major source of extra stress/resentment. Also there is a balance with that. I learned how to not shut out my sig other during a studying fugue without compromising my studies. That made a world of difference. That really helps with anyone in your life that's important to you, though.

Don't be afraid to utilize tutoring, mental health resources... anything at your disposal. Also, it helps if your schedule with work is at least a little flexible... either with time off or shifting of schedules to accommodate studying/projects.

There were times I was incredibly burnt out. Breaks between quarters helped. But I got used to the crazy. Now that I've graduated, I almost want it back. A 'lil bored.
 

lnguyen1412

2+ Year Member
Aug 4, 2015
1,050
964
Status
Medical Student
I took 4 courses, full time job during undergraduate, marrid and have family to take care too. Still pulled a 3.5 gpa and recently accepted to med school.

Med school need to see you have dedication and commitments. Show it to them by making sure you have the ability to handle many things at once.

If you have dreams. You going to make it works buddy
 

NecrotizingFasciitis

SDN Bronze Donor
Bronze Donor
2+ Year Member
Jul 15, 2015
1,502
2,266
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Medical Student
Through my last year of undergrad I was working 32 hours/week at the hospital, a full time student, doing research, tutoring, and studying for the MCAT. I was able to manage all of this and ace my classes by developing a strict studying schedule that allowed me an hour or two after class/work/a studying session to relax and do something I wanted to do.

I think what you want to do is completely do-able, all you have to do is be a pro at time-management. I think if you do this well enough you'll be able to probably even have a solid social life. Like others have said, it takes a week or two to adjust and get used to adhering to such a strict schedule, but in the long run you'll be a stronger and happier student. You will have all the necessary time to study and also be able to hangout with friends or go to the gym or whatever it is you like to do. Just don't let yourself deviate from you schedule! Stay strong.

Incorporating time for yourself to relax is just as important as studying arduous hours to ace your science classes. Like our muscles, our brain gets tired too!

Best of luck!
 
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ConfusedChemist

2+ Year Member
Aug 5, 2014
804
398
Status
Medical Student
Look, hearing that others did it won't mean that applies to you.

You're taking classes to raise your GPA, so you're wasting your own money and time if you don't raise your GPA. Start classes, if you ace the first term, then work more hours.
 
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dwgrubbs1s

2+ Year Member
Oct 1, 2015
197
227
Status
Medical Student
Load up on caffeine, you can sleep when your dead. In all seriousness though, this all depends on your confidence in your ability to juggle all of it. If you want a career in medicine I would say your GPA is priority at this point (well for getting into medical school at least). As others have said, do grade replacement on the science courses you had a bad grade in. Despite this job giving you healthcare experience, it will be irrelevant if your GPA is still low. If you think you can do both, then go for it. It is doable for sure but you may want to evaluate why your GPA is currently a 2.8. Is it because you didn't try? Was it too hard? I graduated nursing school and began working the following summer along with beginning my pre med prerequisties. Took physics during the summer and worked 7-7 overnight. Class would start at 9 in the morning, last until noon. I would get home at about 1230, sleep until about 6 that evening, and repeat. Although I ended up with a B in physics, I feel I could've had an A in there had I not been nodding off in class. When the fall semester started it wasn't near as bad and my work schedule fit well with my school schedule. My experience is, it is most definitely doable but everyone is different. GPA is very important, but so are bills. My suggestion: 1.) evaluate yourself and figure out why you have a low gpa. 2.) if it is something that is fixable, fix it. 3.) if you decide to do both, become more self-disciplined than ever and always remember the bigger picture when you are bogged down. Its a grind. Best of luck.