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Jobs outlook for cities over 100k?

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dmk21

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So I'm a 3rd year male osteopathic medical student and was considering pursuing OB/GYN but was wondering what the job market is looking like for cities of more than 100k.

I know that there will always be a demand for doctors but I'm wondering what the market will look like. Will there be jobs with an average salary above 300k (working the average number of hours) or would I be making 200k. How competitive/hard will it be to land one of these jobs fresh out of residency? If I did have a particular place I wanted to live in (i.e Cincinnati) would it be easy to get a job once I graduate or would I have to wait for a while for there to be a new opening or someone to retire. Does being a male come at a disadvantage to job marketability as I'm seeing more and more all Female practices

Everyone says there are jobs as long as you're not on coast and that you should look places that are in the flyover land but does that hold true for places like Cincinnati, Kansas City, St. Louis etc. I'm basically wondering what the job prospect looks like in cities where at least 2 major highways go through the city (I know not the quickest way of determining a "big city").

Thanks for the help in advance
 

Dr G Oogle

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Plenty of jobs at those places will probably need more in the near future, will easily be making 300K+ if in PP and no residents, being a male won’t hurt you, just expect to have majority of your job be office and OB
 

dmk21

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Plenty of jobs at those places will probably need more in the near future, will easily be making 300K+ if in PP and no residents, being a male won’t hurt you, just expect to have majority of your job be office and OB

Thanks for your reply and for being very active in this forum "Dr G Oogle". What do you mean by a majority of my job will be in office and OB?

I've seen in previous post of your's saying that most OB's now will only have 12 Hysterectomies on average. Are you stating that most of my career will be on the OB side and that there will be less and less surgical procedures going forward? If this is what you are referring to is it possible to build a practice towards Gyn heavy or is it just a difficult grind/not likely unless I do a fellowship in MIGS
 

Dr G Oogle

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Yea that’s pretty much what I’m saying. 12 a year is actually the top 20% the majority so far fewer. Though if you’re in a really rural area you may get to do more surgery. Remember that that number 12/year is for major surgery. There are minors as well like LEEPs, hysteroscopy, Tubals, ablations, maybe the occasional ectopic etc. if you join a larger group even if rural there may be already one or two people who get the majority of surgeries shunted to them to do most of the majors in the group. That’s just the nature of the field, contemporary obgyn residents are just not getting sufficient surgical training to do major surgery and current solutions like tracking are probably just a stop on the way to either a longer residency or just splitting up OB and gyn or doing something like ESIR where you march into obgyn and then apply for gyn surgery that way you get competent generalists and people who want to do surgery get more training without having to do MIGS felowship.
 
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Dr. Death

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Yea that’s pretty much what I’m saying. 12 a year is actually the top 20% the majority so far fewer. Though if you’re in a really rural area you may get to do more surgery. Remember that that number 12/year is for major surgery. There are minors as well like LEEPs, hysteroscopy, Tubals, ablations, maybe the occasional ectopic etc. if you join a larger group even if rural there may be already one or two people who get the majority of surgeries shunted to them to do most of the majors in the group. That’s just the nature of the field, contemporary obgyn residents are just not getting sufficient surgical training to do major surgery and current solutions like tracking are probably just a stop on the way to either a longer residency or just splitting up OB and gyn or doing something like ESIR where you march into obgyn and then apply for gyn surgery that way you get competent generalists and people who want to do surgery get more training without having to do MIGS felowship.
Interesting perspective. Thanks for sharing
 

Jecave

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Yea that’s pretty much what I’m saying. 12 a year is actually the top 20% the majority so far fewer. Though if you’re in a really rural area you may get to do more surgery. Remember that that number 12/year is for major surgery. There are minors as well like LEEPs, hysteroscopy, Tubals, ablations, maybe the occasional ectopic etc. if you join a larger group even if rural there may be already one or two people who get the majority of surgeries shunted to them to do most of the majors in the group. That’s just the nature of the field, contemporary obgyn residents are just not getting sufficient surgical training to do major surgery and current solutions like tracking are probably just a stop on the way to either a longer residency or just splitting up OB and gyn or doing something like ESIR where you march into obgyn and then apply for gyn surgery that way you get competent generalists and people who want to do surgery get more training without having to do MIGS felowship.

Considering that generalists are doing less and less major surgeries, how are new graduates obtaining enough cases for Oral boards?
 

anonperson

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So I'm a 3rd year male osteopathic medical student and was considering pursuing OB/GYN but was wondering what the job market is looking like for cities of more than 100k.

I know that there will always be a demand for doctors but I'm wondering what the market will look like. Will there be jobs with an average salary above 300k (working the average number of hours) or would I be making 200k. How competitive/hard will it be to land one of these jobs fresh out of residency? If I did have a particular place I wanted to live in (i.e Cincinnati) would it be easy to get a job once I graduate or would I have to wait for a while for there to be a new opening or someone to retire. Does being a male come at a disadvantage to job marketability as I'm seeing more and more all Female practices

Everyone says there are jobs as long as you're not on coast and that you should look places that are in the flyover land but does that hold true for places like Cincinnati, Kansas City, St. Louis etc. I'm basically wondering what the job prospect looks like in cities where at least 2 major highways go through the city (I know not the quickest way of determining a "big city").

Thanks for the help in advance

What's average hours?

There are jobs everywhere. The burnout is sufficiently high that new bodies are constantly needed.

Cincinnati and Kansas City are flyover land. Sorry to break it to you.

It took us over a year to recruit and hire 2 new OB GYNs in Southern California. Starting salary of $275k.

Regarding getting enough GYN volume. That is practice and location dependent but most shouldn't have trouble getting their numbers.
 

Shufflin

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What's average hours?

There are jobs everywhere. The burnout is sufficiently high that new bodies are constantly needed.

Cincinnati and Kansas City are flyover land. Sorry to break it to you.

It took us over a year to recruit and hire 2 new OB GYNs in Southern California. Starting salary of $275k.

Regarding getting enough GYN volume. That is practice and location dependent but most shouldn't have trouble getting their numbers.

With such a low salary of $275K, it's no wonder it took over a year. Hope those doctors get paid more.
 

anonperson

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With such a low salary of $275K, it's no wonder it took over a year. Hope those doctors get paid more.

That's the going rate in LA/OC for a starting grad on average. Having interviewed with several different practices (groups and health systems) this is in line. New grads need a fair bit of hand holding as well. Not like they can be completely functional right off the bat.

You can make more in BFE but then you'd have to actually live in BFE.
 
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Dr G Oogle

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Considering that generalists are doing less and less major surgeries, how are new graduates obtaining enough cases for Oral boards?

the case requirements are pretty minimal and broad so even if you’re not doing a ton of hysts you can get the gyn numbers. you’re also allowed to include admissions and consults. The only requirement is 20 cases, 2 in each category, list below. Only 2 are related to hysterectomy and you can fulfill requirement without ever needing to do hysterectomy. If you do need some you can double scrub with a partner which most do, or if you’re more rural won’t have issues getting numbers. Some may wait to take boards for several years to build up a more robust gyn practice to fulfill requirement.


Gynecology Categories
1. Abdominal hysterectomy, any type (e.g. total, subtotal, laparoscopic, robotic) 2. Laparotomy
3. Vaginal hysterectomy (including laparoscopically assisted)
4. Diagnostic laparoscopy
5. Operative laparoscopy (other than tubal sterilization and hysterectomy) 6. Operative hysteroscopy
7. Uterine myomata
8. Repair of pelvic floor defects; prolapse
9. Endometriosis and adenomyosis: surgical management 10. Sterilization procedures
11. Invasive carcinoma
12. Urinary and fecal incontinence: operative management 13. Ectopic pregnancy: surgical management
14. Operative management of pelvic pain
15. Congenital abnormalities of the reproductive tract
15

16. Pelvic inflammatory disease
17. Adnexal problems (excluding ectopic pregnancy and PID)
18. Abnormal uterine bleeding
19. Surgical management of VIN, CIN and VAIN
20. Postoperative complications (hemorrhage, wound, urinary tract, GI, Pain, thrombotic, embolic,
neurologic, fever, etc.)
21. Management of rectovaginal or urinary tract fistula
22. Preoperative evaluation of coexisting conditions (respiratory, cardiac, metabolic diseases)
23. Gestational trophoblastic disease
24. Incomplete, septic, complete and other abortion
25. Intraoperative complications (e.g. blood loss, hemorrhage, bowel injury, urinary tract injury)
26. Dilation & Currettage
27. Emergency care
99. Uncategorized (cases in this category do not count toward the required 20 cases)
3. Obstetrics Case List
A list of a minimum of 20 obstetrical patients must be entered. Separately enter eac
 

marcozecca

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What's average hours?

There are jobs everywhere. The burnout is sufficiently high that new bodies are constantly needed.

Cincinnati and Kansas City are flyover land. Sorry to break it to you.

It took us over a year to recruit and hire 2 new OB GYNs in Southern California. Starting salary of $275k.

Regarding getting enough GYN volume. That is practice and location dependent but most shouldn't have trouble getting their numbers.

Do you offer J1/H1 visa sponsorship?
 
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