chocolate__chicken

2+ Year Member
Apr 27, 2016
3
0
Status
Pre-Medical
Hi everyone.

It seems I've found myself in a sticky situation and I don't know the answer to my problems or even who really to ask. So here's what I'm dealing with: I am a Texas resident, taking the MCAT in Sept of this year and planning on applying next summer to Matriculate in the fall of 2018. As a resident of Texas I know that my chances of getting into publicly funded schools here in Texas are vastly greater than if I wasn't a Texas resident. I currently live in San Antonio but am planning on moving to NY or Boston in the fall post MCAT. I plan on being in the Northeast for 1 to 2 years before I return to attend medical school. If I do this will I lose my status as a resident in Texas? Is there a way around this?
 

lavacake

7+ Year Member
Jul 26, 2012
101
37
Status
Pre-Medical
There're a few ways to claim residency, and I think having gone to HS in Texas will net you the residency status. TMDSAS has a section on this on their website if you want to check
 

DokterMom

SDN Gold Donor
Gold Donor
5+ Year Member
Mar 1, 2013
5,257
11,655
Status
Non-Student
The residency rules are spelled out on the TMDSAS site, but from what I recall, that sounds like you will be relinquishing your residency... But read the rules first! What we say doesn't matter; what they say does.
 

Obnoxious Dad

10+ Year Member
Oct 21, 2007
906
521
Between Stan Getz and Jimmy Giuffre
Status
Non-Student
If you want to go to a state owned medical school in Texas, moving to New York or Boston is really stupid. Given the scenario you suggest, I think you would fail the residency test. Here is the link to the TMDSAS page:
https://www.tmdsas.com/medical/residency.html

Even if you qualified as a Texas resident and had a great MCAT and GPA, you would still smell like a rat in the admissions process and might be rejected. If you want to move north just for the fun of it, the admissions committee will think you are much less likely to practice in Beaumont than in New York. The State of Texas does not subsidize medical schools for the benefit of the students. They want to train physicians who will practice in Texas. That's why the instate percentage at most Texas med schools hovers at 90%.

You should also know that except for MD/PhD students, the University of Massachusetts med school will not accept nonresidents. For med school admissions purposes you need to reside in Taxachusetts for five years. Yikes.

If you want to maintain a great chance of admission at a high quality low cost medical school, keep your keister in Texas.
 
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Skittsie13

10+ Year Member
Mar 14, 2009
527
544
Status
Medical Student
There're a few ways to claim residency, and I think having gone to HS in Texas will net you the residency status. TMDSAS has a section on this on their website if you want to check
But it only applies if you've lived in TX for a year before the app deadline, which for OP would be October 2017. OP, I had a similar issue -- I wanted to live OOS but stay as a TX resident. Eventually decided the benefits of living somewhere else for awhile weren't worth the sacrificing of losing TX residency (and as the previous poster said, you might not be able to claim residency of ANY state, which could be a huge disadvantage). Stay in TX.