dancingdoctor13

7+ Year Member
Mar 28, 2010
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Hey Everyone

Quick question here! I currently live in a state that is uber competitive for medical school. Do you think moving to Texas is a good idea? i heard that their schools do not necessarily have lower standards, but it is easier to get into medical school there if you have decent, average scores on the MCATS and GPA and are in state. Is this true? What are some other states that I could consider? Any thoughts?
 
Jun 1, 2009
1,051
2
0
Status
Medical Student
Hey Everyone

Quick question here! I currently live in a state that is uber competitive for medical school. Do you think moving to Texas is a good idea? i heard that their schools do not necessarily have lower standards, but it is easier to get into medical school there if you have decent, average scores on the MCATS and GPA and are in state. Is this true? What are some other states that I could consider? Any thoughts?
I really don't doubt this.
 

texasgal87

7+ Year Member
Dec 7, 2009
137
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141
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Medical Student
There are different "levels" of texas residency that some schools in texas use. You would be a resident, but you would be lower "tier" of resident. Also, getting into texas schools is still competitive for texas students. Grab the MSAR from a bookstore and it will say what resident requirements are I believe for each school. Hope this helps.
 

dancingdoctor13

7+ Year Member
Mar 28, 2010
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Thanks for the link Catalystik.....i guess it will be another year then before i could apply as a texas resident.....that sux...hmmmm

Does anyone know if this also applies to Florida or any other state which has a lot of medical schools that prefer only in state students?
 
Jan 20, 2010
25
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41
Plano, TX
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Pre-Medical
dancingdoctor13, I am in a similar situation as you, I just moved to Texas in October and I am going to be applying this upcoming application cycle. While I think it is an awesome state to move to for medical school, make sure and move there at least a year before you plan to apply because they seem to be pretty strict with their residency rules. I am not even sure if I will get in state residency for this year because my 12 month period of residency falls right outside their deadline. Some schools seem to be more lenient with this 1 year rule, but it will definetely save you some headaches if you move there early
 
Feb 15, 2010
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41
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Pre-Medical
hmm
I am also considering this. So if you move to texas in may or june and you buy a house, cant you still apply in aug as a resident bc u have established ties.??? Along with changing ur id to a texas 1
 
Jan 20, 2010
25
0
41
Plano, TX
Status
Pre-Medical
hmm
I am also considering this. So if you move to texas in may or june and you buy a house, cant you still apply in aug as a resident bc u have established ties.??? Along with changing ur id to a texas 1
If you mean applying one month after you move, they will not accept you as a resident for application purposes but you would be a resident for tuition purposes. This is the exact issue I am dealing with. They don't count you as a resident until you have physically resided and owned property in Texas for one year. If you plan on doing this, you could apply but it would probably be better to wait an extra year if thats at all possible. I am going to apply even though I wont be a resident till October, the schools will be notified of the date you will be a resident so they definetely take living in Texas into consideration.
 

CityLights

7+ Year Member
Jan 27, 2010
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There are different "levels" of texas residency that some schools in texas use. You would be a resident, but you would be lower "tier" of resident. Also, getting into texas schools is still competitive for texas students. Grab the MSAR from a bookstore and it will say what resident requirements are I believe for each school. Hope this helps.
Can you expand on this, if you know any more? I mean, you're either a legal resident of texas or not, which would require most people to work in the state for a year without being a student. I can't see schools discriminating against residents due to the amount of time that they have been residents for...
 
Nov 11, 2009
155
0
0
Colorado
Status
Medical Student
I did just did this in Colorado, and if it is anything like here it worked for me! Although I know Texas has a different system for applying. One thing I almost missed is that to be considered a resident for tuition standards I had to be a Colorado resident for a full year, and since school starts this year August 9th or 10th or something like that they considered the beginning of the 12 months to be July 9th/10th. I had to have my ID changed over, register to vote, register my car here, and file partial income taxes as soon as I could. The last thing I did was register my car...Did it on July 6th thinking I had another month and I ALMOST missed it! Haha three days later would have cost me about 100 grand! Also, when I sent in amcas I called the registrar at UCD and they said to put on my application where my residency would be when school started, so I put Colorado! From what I could figure out I was considered a Colorado resident right when I got all that stuff done, just not a long-standing resident or something like that for tuition purposes for a year.
 
Jul 31, 2009
1,275
45
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Be careful about TX they are very strict because they know they have good cheap schools and every1 wants in
 

dancingdoctor13

7+ Year Member
Mar 28, 2010
167
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So just to clarify,
in order to be considered an in state texas med school applicant, I have live have lived in Texas 1 year prior to APPLYING or MATRICULATION? From what i have understood thus far, is that I have to have lived in Texas one year prior to applying and therefore would only get the chance to apply as an in state applicant in 2011-2012 cycle? Is this correct? Is this only for Texas?

The individual who got into a Colorado med school, is this the opposite for Colorado...you only have to live there 1 year prior to matriculating in order to be considered in state?

Thank you all! You're all so helpful!
 
Nov 11, 2009
155
0
0
Colorado
Status
Medical Student
So just to clarify,
in order to be considered an in state texas med school applicant, I have live have lived in Texas 1 year prior to APPLYING or MATRICULATION? From what i have understood thus far, is that I have to have lived in Texas one year prior to applying and therefore would only get the chance to apply as an in state applicant in 2011-2012 cycle? Is this correct? Is this only for Texas?

The individual who got into a Colorado med school, is this the opposite for Colorado...you only have to live there 1 year prior to matriculating in order to be considered in state?

Thank you all! You're all so helpful!
Yup! One year before matriculation is all...as of right now they tell me I'll be a resident! But it's more than just living...You HAVE to have those other requirements met to! They are pretty strict because they know people like to move here is what I have heard....but definitely NOT because of tuition! Haha no one lives here for tuition purposes....
 
Jan 20, 2010
25
0
41
Plano, TX
Status
Pre-Medical
So just to clarify,
in order to be considered an in state texas med school applicant, I have live have lived in Texas 1 year prior to APPLYING or MATRICULATION? From what i have understood thus far, is that I have to have lived in Texas one year prior to applying and therefore would only get the chance to apply as an in state applicant in 2011-2012 cycle? Is this correct? Is this only for Texas?

The individual who got into a Colorado med school, is this the opposite for Colorado...you only have to live there 1 year prior to matriculating in order to be considered in state?

Thank you all! You're all so helpful!
To be considered an in state applicant for Texas, you must meet the 12-month requirement prior to October 1st. If you become a resident after October 1st, but before matriculation, you will be considered in state for tuition purposes. In my case, I will be a resident around October 5th so tmdsas told me they would send a letter to all the schools stating I will be a resident on that date and I assume they would do the same for you even if you have only been a resident for a month or two. Like a previous poster said, they are very skeptical of new Texas residents applying to medical school so make sure you make it clear you are not there just to take advantage of the Texas medical school tuition. When were you thinking about moving?
 

justdoit31

10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jul 13, 2008
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Remember that you can have OOS tuition waived if the school gives you more than $1000/yr in merit scholarship. I left Texas when I was 15 and then applied to 4 of the schools as OOS with average stats and got interviews from 2 of the 4. Then I got offered the scholarship so I pay instate.