steveyk

Full Member
7+ Year Member
Jul 27, 2011
244
124
  1. Physical Therapy Student
    Dear Readers!

    I’m a third year SPT and would like to seek advice on the two options listed above. As I enter my final year of PT school, I’m wanting to really sit down and weigh my options in the ortho/manual field since I’ll be walking on that stage in no time.

    Can someone with experience in an ortho residency or a manual therapy fellowship share what the pros and cons of each are? I am aware that fellowship programs are requiring the completion of an ortho residency or obtain the OCS before applying but that rule doesn’t apply until 2020. I’ve heard mixed opinions on pursuing residencies vs fellowships and would appreciate any pieces of advice during this decision making process.

    My goals: meet excellent mentors and be an expert/specialist in the outpatient orthopedic setting
    My options:
    - ortho residency (and possibly pursue MT fellowship after)
    - practice and take OCS exam (and possibly pursue MT fellowship after)
    - COMT (and pursue MT fellowship)
    - or just practice and rely on experience

    Thank you all in advance for your wisdom!
     

    noyceguy

    Full Member
    7+ Year Member
    Aug 17, 2010
    236
    136
      None of these certs will help you earn money beyond what you would make as an uncertified therapist, and they each cost thousands of dollars, so just practice and do your CEU's or extra reading.
       
      • Like
      Reactions: 1 users

      jesspt

      Full Member
      10+ Year Member
      Jan 31, 2008
      1,127
      410
      Chicago, IL
      1. DPT / OTD
        Dear Readers!

        I’m a third year SPT and would like to seek advice on the two options listed above. As I enter my final year of PT school, I’m wanting to really sit down and weigh my options in the ortho/manual field since I’ll be walking on that stage in no time.

        Can someone with experience in an ortho residency or a manual therapy fellowship share what the pros and cons of each are? I am aware that fellowship programs are requiring the completion of an ortho residency or obtain the OCS before applying but that rule doesn’t apply until 2020. I’ve heard mixed opinions on pursuing residencies vs fellowships and would appreciate any pieces of advice during this decision making process.

        My goals: meet excellent mentors and be an expert/specialist in the outpatient orthopedic setting
        My options:
        - ortho residency (and possibly pursue MT fellowship after)
        - practice and take OCS exam (and possibly pursue MT fellowship after)
        - COMT (and pursue MT fellowship)
        - or just practice and rely on experience

        Thank you all in advance for your wisdom!

        Well, in my opinion, residency would be the best way to accomplish your goals, as formal mentorship is a significant component of a residency program.
         
        • Like
        Reactions: 1 user
        About the Ads

        steveyk

        Full Member
        7+ Year Member
        Jul 27, 2011
        244
        124
        1. Physical Therapy Student
          Well, in my opinion, residency would be the best way to accomplish your goals, as formal mentorship is a significant component of a residency program.
          I appreciate your comment. Just curious, isn’t formal membership a significant component of a fellowship as well? Last I recall, a fellowship has more mentorship hours built into the curriculum than a residency.
           

          Sheldon

          Full Member
          10+ Year Member
          Feb 24, 2011
          132
          43
          1. DPT / OTD
            If you are seeking mentorship, residency is a great option. You will learn and grow faster, and hopefully receive great mentorship along the way vs. just taking the OCS. I probably grew as a clinician more during residency than my fellowship.
             

            jesspt

            Full Member
            10+ Year Member
            Jan 31, 2008
            1,127
            410
            Chicago, IL
            1. DPT / OTD
              I appreciate your comment. Just curious, isn’t formal membership a significant component of a fellowship as well? Last I recall, a fellowship has more mentorship hours built into the curriculum than a residency.
              I'm not sure about the number of hours in each of the curricula.
              You're currently a student - you might be getting ahead of yourself with focusing on a fellowship. IMO you'll best set yourself up for a successful career by establishing good clinical reasoning skills. You can do this on your own. Residency probably makes it easier.
              COMT programs have no governing body and therefore can have a curriculum that is not evidence-informed. Be careful if you choose this path.
               

              2234leej

              New Member
              Nov 2, 2012
              4
              9
              1. DPT / OTD
                I'd highly recommend doing a full-time residency following PT graduation. Gail Deyle and a number of other prominent PTs have stated that a 1 year residency is equivalent to 4-5 years of practice. You will be far and above better than your counterparts who go straight into practice. Residency isn't just about improving your clinical reasoning and differential diagnosis skills. Two of my instructors were also fellows of AAOMPT, so there was a heavy manual therapy component as well. I became proficient with spinal manipulation through residency.

                Here's another huge bonus: being residency trained, board-certified and fellowship-trained highly increases your chances of being able to teach at a university/residency. Just about 100% of residencies require faculty to be board certified. Most faculty positions at universities also require advanced credentials like the OCS/FAAOMPT certification (unless you have a PhD or have "an in" at the institution). Being residency-trained and board certified in orthopedics opened up a lot of doors for me. I am not fellowship-trained; however, most fellows that I have seen are great clinicians. I learned a tremendous amount of manual therapy/associated clinical reasoning for manual therapy in residency hence, I did not see the need to pursue fellowship afterward.
                 
                • Like
                Reactions: 1 user
                About the Ads
                This thread is more than 3 years old.

                Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

                1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
                2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
                3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
                4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
                5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
                6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
                7. This thread is locked.