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Osteopathic schools that teach nutrition?

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Luckygirlsadheart

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Hi! I would really liked to be trained in nutrition. Does anybody know any osteopathic medical schools that make nutrition a part of their curriculum?

Do you know of any residency type programs where you can get certified in nutrition, if this is not a possibility?
 

DocWinter

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If you want to learn nutrition go become a dietitian. You'll probably get 1 or 2 lectures in medical school.
Medical schools teach medicine.
 
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Luckygirlsadheart

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If you want to learn nutrition go become a dietitian. You'll probably get 1 or 2 lectures in medical school.
Medical schools teach medicine.
That's where western medicine is wrong...so much of your health is related to nutrition. Which do you think is better? A diabetic going off sugar or a diabetic taking metaformin and having to deal with the unnecessary side effects? A good doctor manages both nutrition and medicine. That's why I want to learn both.
 
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samac

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That's where western medicine is wrong...so much of your health is related to nutrition. Which do you think is better? A diabetic going off sugar or a diabetic taking metaformin and having to deal with the unnecessary side effects? A good doctor manages both nutrition and medicine. That's why I want to learn both.
A good doctor counsels their patient on diet and gives them metformin. The patient just tends to not listen. We had one 4 week class. If you're that interested in nutrition maybe becoming a dietitian is a better option.
 
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Rekt

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That's where western medicine is wrong...so much of your health is related to nutrition. Which do you think is better? A diabetic going off sugar or a diabetic taking metaformin and having to deal with the unnecessary side effects? A good doctor manages both nutrition and medicine. That's why I want to learn both.

Then that patient goes home and eats two large Pizzas and soggifies it down with a large Coke.

Welcome to reality.
 
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DocWinter

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Thanks for the lecture, really opened my eyes.

A good doctor tries to do that. Bad patients don't make a good doctor bad or the schools incorrect.
Medical school is a two year board prep. You need to learn what's on the boards. Nutrition is not big, difficult subject. DASH diet, gluten free, eat your fruits and veggies and you're mostly there.
 

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One of the biochem professors at OSU-COM teaches an elective nutrition course during the spring semester available to med and graduate students. Didn't take it so I can't provide any information other than that. Might be able to hunt down a syllabus if you are really interested.
 

Staphylococcus Aureus

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That's where western medicine is wrong...so much of your health is related to nutrition. Which do you think is better? A diabetic going off sugar or a diabetic taking metaformin and having to deal with the unnecessary side effects? A good doctor manages both nutrition and medicine. That's why I want to learn both.
Thank you pre-med for lecturing us on what is wrong with "western" medicine. You will learn things like metabolism and the building blocks of what foods break down to and how they are incorporated into humans' biochemistry, and B12, D, iron, folic acid etc deficiencies, but as far as counseling them on how to buy and prepare meals you wont really find that. There's no magic food to learn about for each disease. It's good that you want to counsel on nutrition, some people honestly don't know what's healthy, but I would say most Americans understand exactly what a balanced varied diet should be, you just won't be able to convince them in 10 minutes that they should change to that diet. I'd love to see how that intervention for "going off sugar" goes with that diabetic patient, because they'll probably say "I know doc" but grab a big gulp on their way home. Then you'll see them for 15 minutes a year later asking if there's something better and easier than metaformin.
 
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Drrrrrr. Celty

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That's where western medicine is wrong...so much of your health is related to nutrition. Which do you think is better? A diabetic going off sugar or a diabetic taking metaformin and having to deal with the unnecessary side effects? A good doctor manages both nutrition and medicine. That's why I want to learn both.

You sound like a walking malpractice law suit after your diabetic patient dies.

I don't know anything about what foods are great for keeping a persons sugars down. Hence why I'll refer them to a dietician. But I do know how to treat their foot and mouth ulcers, potential neuropathies, and infections. And the answer isn't me telling them to stop eating sugar. It's medicine. Sure, I'm not going to downplay the need for diet and exercise, nor should or does anyone. But I'm not going to stop giving them metformin until there is evidence that them going off of it won't lead them to get ill.
 
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Drrrrrr. Celty

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Thank you pre-med for lecturing us on what is wrong with "western" medicine. You will learn things like metabolism and the building blocks of what foods break down to and how they are incorporated into humans' biochemistry, and B12, D, iron, folic acid etc deficiencies, but as far as counseling them on how to buy and prepare meals you wont really find that. There's no magic food to learn about for each disease. It's good that you want to counsel on nutrition, some people honestly don't know what's healthy, but I would say most Americans understand exactly what a balanced varied diet should be, you just won't be able to convince them in 10 minutes that they should change to that diet. I'd love to see how that intervention for "going off sugar" goes with that diabetic patient, because they'll probably say "I know doc" but grab a big gulp on their way home. Then you'll see them for 15 minutes a year later asking if there's something better and easier than metaformin.

Tbh, there's a major rise in Woo these days with subscriptions to super or mega foods, notions that single things treat diseases, or notions that in general science and pharmaceuticals are bad. Hell, there are entire group of ppl dedicated to the belief that GMOs are bad for you.
 
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Staphylococcus Aureus

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Tbh, there's a major rise in Woo these days with subscriptions to super or mega foods, notions that single things treat diseases, or notions that in general science and pharmaceuticals are bad. Hell, there are entire group of ppl dedicated to the belief that GMOs are bad for you.
That group is called facebook. Don't you know that a handful of cashews and brussel sprout oil is proven to work better than beta blockers??
 
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AlbinoHawk DO

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Western has many lectures in it, but like any school, they train you in the basics. The rest is on you to master.
 

NurWollen

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Questioning how much medical school teaches about nutrition is a dog whistle of sorts for quacks. I have a cousin who dropped out of chiropractic school and fancies himself a "wellness expert." Nutrition is important of course. But when people bring up nutrition in the context of medicine it's usually in regards to the pseudoscientific idea that proper nutrition can cure everything from crohn's to cancer to fatigue. These people micro analyze the biochemistry of every little food. "Legumes are bad because they have phytic acid which keeps you from absorbing enough nutrients." "Corn causes leaky gut." "Avoid inflammatory foods" whatever that means.

These are the same people who ate often anti-vax, pro-home birth etc.

Everyone here already knows that. OP probably does too. Which is why OP is probably a troll.

Edit: just read another example on the dark reaches of the Internet. "Paleo helps me control my Lyme disease."

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Atom612

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Questioning how much medical school teaches about nutrition is a dog whistle of sorts for quacks. I have a cousin who dropped out of chiropractic school and fancies himself a "wellness expert." Nutrition is important of course. But when people bring up nutrition in the context of medicine it's usually in regards to the pseudoscientific idea that proper nutrition can cure everything from crohn's to cancer to fatigue. These people micro analyze the biochemistry of every little food. "Legumes are bad because they have phytic acid which keeps you from absorbing enough nutrients." "Corn causes leaky gut." "Avoid inflammatory foods" whatever that means.

These are the same people who ate often anti-vax, pro-home birth etc.

Everyone here already knows that. OP probably does too. Which is why OP is probably a troll.

Edit: just read another example on the dark reaches of the Internet. "Paleo helps me control my Lyme disease."

Sent from my SM-G930V using SDN mobile

There were a couple of nutrition majors in my SO's undergrad micro class. They formed a certain clique of sorts and would endlessly **** on the pre-meds, saying that while they were busy prescribing drugs they would be healing America...:rolleyes:
 
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Staphylococcus Aureus

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Nutrition is analogous to exercise. We understand exercise in the context of medicine and physiology, but OP is basically asking why don't medical schools have electives in weightlifting or jogging. Like nutrition, if you only cared about being trained in exercise you wouldn't go to med school.
 

Leggomyeggo128

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Western has many lectures in it, but like any school, they train you in the basics. The rest is on you to master.

Back on topic....I'll second westernU offering training in nutrition. There is a lifestyle medicine tract that a lot of our students participate in. It includes extra lectures, cooking work shops, and lifestyle med rotations. There are also faculty doing research projects in nutrition (if you want to get involved in that).

You can do as much or as little as you want as it's all optional.
 
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deleted707454

Thanks for the lecture, really opened my eyes.

A good doctor tries to do that. Bad patients don't make a good doctor bad or the schools incorrect.
Medical school is a two year board prep. You need to learn what's on the boards. Nutrition is not big, difficult subject. DASH diet, gluten free, eat your fruits and veggies and you're mostly there.

Why did you include gluten-free here?
 

impervious0ne

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If you want to learn nutrition go become a dietitian. You'll probably get 1 or 2 lectures in medical school.
Medical schools teach medicine.

That sentiment seems to be changing. I went to seminars held by Dr. Frates and Dr. Ludwig (HMS) and it appears that med schools are giving more consideration to nutrition sciences.
 
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SurgDoc95

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That's where western medicine is wrong...so much of your health is related to nutrition. Which do you think is better? A diabetic going off sugar or a diabetic taking metaformin and having to deal with the unnecessary side effects? A good doctor manages both nutrition and medicine. That's why I want to learn both.

Go learn medicine some place else that fits your definition. Leaves a spot open for someone else who isn't quacky.
 
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Mr Roboto

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VCOM has nutrition lectures in blocks 1 and 2.
 
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AlbinoHawk DO

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Back on topic....I'll second westernU offering training in nutrition. There is a lifestyle medicine tract that a lot of our students participate in. It includes extra lectures, cooking work shops, and lifestyle med rotations. There are also faculty doing research projects in nutrition (if you want to get involved in that).

You can do as much or as little as you want as it's all optional.
They also do a fair job covering it in MCBM and then the GI system. Definitely the outside workshops are great for those that want to learn more, but I'll say the school does obsessively push vegetarian and vegan diets.
 

DO2015CA

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They also do a fair job covering it in MCBM and then the GI system. Definitely the outside workshops are great for those that want to learn more, but I'll say the school does obsessively push vegetarian and vegan diets.


You are also going to school in the epicenter of crunchy granola land in the capital of antivaxxers
 
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n3xa

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They also do a fair job covering it in MCBM and then the GI system. Definitely the outside workshops are great for those that want to learn more, but I'll say the school does obsessively push vegetarian and vegan diets.

Vegan? Boy times have changed.
 

Staphylococcus Aureus

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I thought veganism was for philosophical reasons as it isn't an optimal diet. Most of the vegans I know are by no means beacons of fitness, I'll pass on all that soy and starches trying to make faux meat.
 
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Luckygirlsadheart

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Whoa guys. I am not sure how this developed into a philosophical debate, treating my curiosity for nutrition as "quacky," and a whole bunch of name calling. All I asked was for a list of medical schools that teach nutrition. Calm down everybody. I want to learn both medicine and nutrition because everybody will agree that what you eat, to some extent, affects your health. That's it.
 
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deleted564680

Whoa guys. I am not sure how this developed into a philosophical debate, treating my curiosity for nutrition as "quacky," and a whole bunch of name calling. All I asked was for a list of medical schools that teach nutrition. Calm down everybody. I want to learn both medicine and nutrition because everybody will agree that what you eat, to some extent, affects your health. That's it.

Nutrition is integrated into the curriculum of almost every medical school and many of them spend dedicated time (usually around 4 weeks). I'm not sure what other answer you want.
 

DocWinter

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Whoa guys. I am not sure how this developed into a philosophical debate, treating my curiosity for nutrition as "quacky," and a whole bunch of name calling. All I asked was for a list of medical schools that teach nutrition. Calm down everybody. I want to learn both medicine and nutrition because everybody will agree that what you eat, to some extent, affects your health. That's it.

Again, you will get a cursory pass of nutrition and diet in medical school. It's not ingrained into every lecture. All medical schools teach it, some possibly more than others, but none of them will teach it to the level of an aspiring nutritionist.
You asked for advice and then shouted from your high horse lecturing people who are years ahead of you in real life training. I don't lecture physicians on things I don't understand to their level. Premeds shouldn't ignorantly lecture medical students and then play the "calm down guys" card.
 

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A third of our year 1 GI block at TCOM is entirely nutrition-based. In addition, first and second year students are selected by lottery to join a culinary medicine class created in partnership with TCU and UTSW.
 
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AlteredScale

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A third of our year 1 GI block at TCOM is entirely nutrition-based. In addition, first and second year students are selected by lottery to join a culinary medicine class created in partnership with TCU and UTSW.

Culinary medicine? Is that where you provide care to chefs who cut themselves and burn themselves?
 
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doing_all_the_things

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One of the reasons I wanted to apply to osteopathic schools was because I was under the impression that they specifically focused on nutritional aspects of preventative care. I was very wrong. They definitely do not consider it important at my school as we got barely 1 lecture and a simple online course. Given the "osteopathic philosophy," nutrition should have a much more significant part in the education. Maybe nixing cranial might make some room. :thinking:
 

Staphylococcus Aureus

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Whoa guys. I am not sure how this developed into a philosophical debate, treating my curiosity for nutrition as "quacky," and a whole bunch of name calling. All I asked was for a list of medical schools that teach nutrition. Calm down everybody. I want to learn both medicine and nutrition because everybody will agree that what you eat, to some extent, affects your health. That's it.
Quack-dars went off because a sentence starting with "That's where western medicine is wrong" is almost always followed by anti-science rhetoric.
 
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just_SAIYAN

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I think nutrition is very important in keeping a person healthy. Second to genetics which you can't control, how you eat and how you exercise are critical in keeping a person thriving long term (more of a preventative measure like not watching porn on your laptop, it'll most likely last longer and preform better if you don't). *disclaimer- I'm no computer wiz*

That being said nutrition is not a focal point for med schools because it's not medicine. Med school focuses on the body and the pathology that goes along with it. It's enough info to learn as it is and getting you ready for Step 1 is their MO. I wouldn't base any decisions on attending med schools around if they teach nutrition.

If you're really interested in nutrition you're going to have to learn it on your own. Follow the nutrition section on your iPhone news app and if you have Netflix there is a good amount of documentaries on nutrition. There's really not a lot that goes into proper nutrition and if you just devote a few hours a day I'm sure you'll know more than enough about nutrition in a week.

Do I think most doctors especially family physicians should be fairly knowledgeable in nutrition, yes. But that's my opinion.


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NurWollen

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I think nutrition is very important in keeping a person healthy. Second to genetics which you can't control, how you eat and how you exercise are critical in keeping a person thriving long term (more of a preventative measure like not watching porn on your laptop, it'll most likely last longer and preform better if you don't). *disclaimer- I'm no computer wiz*

That being said nutrition is not a focal point for med schools because it's not medicine. Med school focuses on the body and the pathology that goes along with it. It's enough info to learn as it is and getting you ready for Step 1 is their MO. I wouldn't base any decisions on attending med schools around if they teach nutrition.

If you're really interested in nutrition you're going to have to learn it on your own. Follow the nutrition section on your iPhone news app and if you have Netflix there is a good amount of documentaries on nutrition. There's really not a lot that goes into proper nutrition and if you just devote a few hours a day I'm sure you'll know more than enough about nutrition in a week.

Do I think most doctors especially family physicians should be fairly knowledgeable in nutrition, yes. But that's my opinion.


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The hard part is separating the real nutrition from the quack nutrition. DASH diet? Great. Low carb? Great. Lots of green veggies and lean protein? Great. Micro-managing the specific veggies you will and won't eat because of the word of one animal study and some bro blogger who thinks he can science? Meh...
 
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AlbinoHawk DO

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Doesn't matter how much doctors know if patients don't listen... I guarantee you every single obese person knows that eating a lot of donuts, McDonald's, and Coke is bad for you.
This, and in the current climate, bringing up obesity is tough because of moody people that will then give bad reviews.
 

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forbes bs article said:
And if you didn't realize it, what you eat affects your health. Oh, and doctors deal with health and disease. Nothing new, right?

... Yes, this number actually went down while the obesity epidemic went up.

...Although such Twitter polls are not scientific studies, they reaffirm what the aforementioned more formal studies have shown.

YL9oFDg.gif


forbes bs said:
1. Already overcrowded medical school curricula.
...Surely obesity and nutrition education can replace many of the minutiae taught in medical school.​

3. Doctors assume that nutritionists and dietitians will always be available to help.
...Plus, unless a doctor and a dietitian decide to tether themselves together like in a two-legged race, there will be many times that a doctor will have to make nutrition-related decisions without a dietitian around. A doctor can't be constantly calling a dietitian​
What, exactly, would nutrition be able to replace in medical school?

Are there really cases where a physician would need to consult a dietitian STAT like this article is suggesting? Aside from what you already learn in med school about nutrition, I find it hard to believe there's a demand for your doc to sit down and meal-plan with you. There's literally registered dietitians for nutrition demands more complicated than what's already taught at med schools.
 
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BurghStudent

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We had one nutrition lecture. The bottom line was when in doubt, use olive oil. All other times, use your brain.

I've worked with plenty of doctors that have counseled their patients on nutrition, particularly nephrologists and endocrinologists. Patient compliance is the bottleneck.
 

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TouroCOM had one professor who was pretty big into nutritional stuff. She gave out handbooks about it in fact.

I believe she was one of the faculty that defected to NYCOM, but I don't know what she teaches there.
 

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https://culinarymedicine.org

The Goldring Center for Culinary Medicine at Tulane University is the first dedicated teaching kitchen to be implemented at a medical school.

The center provides hands-on training for medical students through culinary medicine classes in the form of electives and seminars as well as continuing education for the healthcare and foodservice industries.
 
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