dentheartthrob

DreamDMDweaver
10+ Year Member
Apr 14, 2005
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On mandibular molars when the central ray is directed distally, the mesial canals will appear in what relation on the radiograph

1. mesiolingual canal distal to the mesiobuccal canal
2. mesiolingual canal mesial to the mesiobuccal canal
3. mesiolingual canal superimposed on the mesiobuccal canal

ans. from packet is 2. How does this relate to the SLOB rule? Thanks
 

drmanglore

10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Sep 28, 2007
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hi, I think this is the explanation: from what i've read SLOB stands for "Same side lingual and opposite side buccal". Therefore this implies that if the xray tube is shifted mesial to its original reference point and the object being viewed also moves to the same side that is mesially in the xray then the object is located lingually, and vice versa. So in the question they said that the xray is directed distally that means the tube is shifted mesially, therefore applying SLOB, whatever is on the lingual side will move mesially and whatever is on buccal side will move distally, So looking at the mesial root or canals, the mesiolingual will appear mesial in relation to mesiobuccal
 
OP
dentheartthrob

dentheartthrob

DreamDMDweaver
10+ Year Member
Apr 14, 2005
417
10
Status
hi, I think this is the explanation: from what i've read SLOB stands for "Same side lingual and opposite side buccal". Therefore this implies that if the xray tube is shifted mesial to its original reference point and the object being viewed also moves to the same side that is mesially in the xray then the object is located lingually, and vice versa. So in the question they said that the xray is directed distally that means the tube is shifted mesially, therefore applying SLOB, whatever is on the lingual side will move mesially and whatever is on buccal side will move distally, So looking at the mesial root or canals, the mesiolingual will appear mesial in relation to mesiobuccal
oic, thanks. i was thinking of the tube instead of the xray beam.