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Rotations at one hospital

KVBane

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Apr 6, 2014
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  1. Resident [Any Field]
    Hello,

    Our school, like most schools offers us the opportunity to do all of our rotations at one hospital, or to be scattered to a few affiliated hospitals.
    Aside from the commuting or location benefits of doing all rotations at one hospital, what are the other benefits/drawbacks?
    Also if you have any experiences about doing all rotations in a single hospital/multiple hospitals please feel free to share.

    Thank you.

    P.S. I tried looking at other threads where this was asked, and I couldn't find any.
     
    Nov 24, 2007
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    1. Attending Physician
      We had most of our rotations at one large hospital and it's local satellite facilities. It makes life a lot easier. They also did some rotations at a hospital system an hour or so away. I liked living in my sweet condo 1000% more than the dorms that we were put up in there.
      The other issue comes down to networking in your desired field. It's easier to bust your ass and audition for the physicians you want to do research/residency/etc with when you're on rotations with them. It's a bit harder when you draw the short straw and get a rotation at the VA, etc. That comes with other benefits though, like more clinical responsibility. Overall it's mostly a convenience thing.


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      Il Destriero
       
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      KVBane

      Full Member
      7+ Year Member
      Apr 6, 2014
      98
      85
      1. Resident [Any Field]
        We had most of our rotations at one large hospital and it's local satellite facilities. It makes life a lot easier. They also did some rotations at a hospital system an hour or so away. I liked living in my sweet condo 1000% more than the dorms that we were put up in there.
        The other issue comes down to networking in your desired field. It's easier to bust your ass and audition for the physicians you want to do research/residency/etc with when you're on rotations with them. It's a bit harder when you draw the short straw and get a rotation at the VA, etc. That comes with other benefits though, like more clinical responsibility. Overall it's mostly a convenience thing.


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        Il Destriero

        So the main benefit is location, thank you
         
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        CajunMedic

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        Mar 24, 2009
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          I'm a DO student rotating in a community setting. One of the big advantages for me has been continuity of care. I've seen a patient on Family Med, admitted and cared for her in the critical access hospital, written the consult for her to see the surgeon for port placement, then saw her in the surgery clinic pre-op, assisted during the surgery, and saw her post-op. I've had several clinic patients on the floor on IM and in the ED.
           

          Pisiform

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          Nov 27, 2009
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            I am doing all my rotation (except electives of course) at one big Level 1 hospital. One of the biggest advantage is that you really get to know people, the residents, nurses and specially attending. I was able to develop a good bond with Chair of Medicine and he wrote me a great letter of recommendation. Other things I like is the familiarity. Jumping from hospital to hospital, it takes few days to get yourself familiarized with the EMR and the layout of the hospital or how things work and by then your rotation is almost over. You would be living in a student housing, wouldn't have to move around like a nomad.

            Disadvantages would be you would be in your comfort zone. You wouldn't get to see different EMR or see how different places worked or interact with differs patient population. For me, it wasn't a big deal since I had electives and electives for that.

            Good luck
             
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