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anperry

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I just finished my first semester of undergrad, and am thinking of applying to ScribeAmerica for a scribing job next semester.

As much as I would like to take up a job as a scribe, I also know that keeping up my GPA is most important (I finished this semester with a 4.0, and will be taking bio, chem II, and physics II--along with an english class--next semester).

Does anyone else have experience scribing early on in their college career?

I should note: I would need to pick up a part time job next semester anyway, and scribing also gives the opportunity to gain clinical experience, however I also don't want to make a hasty decision to take on another responsibility that would overwhelm my schedule....
 

7331poas

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I mean. You will have two hurdles. 1) is you will definitely be the youngest person in the room and look the part as well. 2) You dont have any physiology, anatomy, or medical terminology background.
 

anperry

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I mean. You will have two hurdles. 1) is you will definitely be the youngest person in the room and look the part as well. 2) You dont have any physiology, anatomy, or medical terminology background.

True. Wouldn't it be possible to pick up necessary terminology, though, after going through training/a few months on the job?
 

RunawayGrape

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True. Wouldn't it be possible to pick up necessary terminology, though, after going through training/a few months on the job?
Absolutely. I'm scribing right now, and I have to say, you don't actually have to know that much medical terminology. You'll pick it up real fast.

However, you should probably worry about actually getting offered the job before you worry about whether or not you'll take it.
 
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wanderingorion

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I just finished my first semester of undergrad, and am thinking of applying to ScribeAmerica for a scribing job next semester.

As much as I would like to take up a job as a scribe, I also know that keeping up my GPA is most important (I finished this semester with a 4.0, and will be taking bio, chem II, and physics II--along with an english class--next semester).

Does anyone else have experience scribing early on in their college career?

I should note: I would need to pick up a part time job next semester anyway, and scribing also gives the opportunity to gain clinical experience, however I also don't want to make a hasty decision to take on another responsibility that would overwhelm my schedule....
Go for it, it's a great opportunity. Just make sure your grades don't suffer. I worked throughout college, and the time-management aspect gets pretty hairy, especially when you're working the night shifts that a scribe does.
 
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sprinter16

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I'm a scribe in a busy ER currently. Granted, I started after graduation, but over half of our staff are still in school. If you end up getting/taking the job, you chief scribe/manager (who does the scheduling) will work with you. A lot of our scribes only work 1-2 days a week, but then will pick up more shifts during the break. Scribing is a great opportunity and you will learn a ton. Plus you'll get to know the doctors you work with super well. If you're worried about time management you can always wait a year or two and just work on volunteering and shadowing first. Both of those are important too.

However, take this with a grain of salt. Everyone will be different. Scribing in a clinic is much different (schedule wise) then scribing in an ER since clinics are typically day shifts and ER is obviously not just day shifts.

Good luck with whatever you decide to do!
 
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ciucia53

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I'm a scribe in a busy ER currently. Granted, I started after graduation, but over half of our staff are still in school. If you end up getting/taking the job, you chief scribe/manager (who does the scheduling) will work with you. A lot of our scribes only work 1-2 days a week, but then will pick up more shifts during the break. Scribing is a great opportunity and you will learn a ton. Plus you'll get to know the doctors you work with super well. If you're worried about time management you can always wait a year or two and just work on volunteering and shadowing first. Both of those are important too.

However, take this with a grain of salt. Everyone will be different. Scribing in a clinic is much different (schedule wise) then scribing in an ER since clinics are typically day shifts and ER is obviously not just day shifts.

Good luck with whatever you decide to do!

I work in a very similar ER. I know our group only requires 1 shift per month, so that is totally manageable for students, and I would say 75% of our current staff is still in undergrad/post-bac program. In terms of having prior knowledge of medical terminology, I don't think it's required much at all. For one, you go through the training program which teaches you a LOT. Also, you pick up a lot on the job. And finally, a lot of the physicians I work with dictate the particular medical terminology they want me to use for the physical exam, so once again, you pick it up on the job! :) I would say apply. It's really a fantastic experience as it gives you clinical exposure, shadowing, and employment experience all in one and I've enjoyed my time so far. You can work on the scheduling with your chief scribe and I think they are really understanding of a student's schedule.
 
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Veggie_Girl

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ScribeAmerica teaches you most of the terminology you need in the classroom training and you pick it up as you go as well! It helped that I had taken physiology, anatomy, and such prior to starting, but it wasn't necessary. It is an amazing job for getting clinical experience and getting to know doctors. As others have mentioned your chief scribe will be great at working with your schedule. Most everyone I work with is in undergrad or getting their Masters.

If you are worried about keeping up with classes consider getting an easier campus job through your school for this coming semester. You can always start scribing over the summer and judge how it will fit into your class schedule for the fall. I worked all four years of undergrad, but got a job on campus during the semester so it was easy for me to go to and from classes, lab, and work. Then I spent my summers focusing on internships and clinical work when I had more time. It's defintely important to focus more on grades, especially with that amazing 4.0 start!!
 
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