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saFTF

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Dear Dentists of SDN,

I am currently a 3rd year dental student, who is very interested in specializing in perio. I am interested in gaining insight about how periodontists are currently performing in private practice. I understand that the private conventional perio office might not be as lucrative as in past decades, but how are current periodontists doing?

The reason I am concerned is because I've spoken to a couple of general dentists who tell me to stay away from perio because many dentists prefer not to refer to periodontists. Furthermore, general dentists currently prefer to do much of the profit generating perio work themselves (i.e. implants) and that it is not worth my time/money to specialize in perio.

As a dental student, I've maintained a close relationship with my school's perio dept and am absolutely in love with the specialty. My school's perio dept is very clinic heavy. Residents are placing 150-200 implants, performing all kinds of grafts, GTR, sinus lifts, soft tissue augmentation and everything an ambitious periodontists does. From a student's perspective perio seems very appealing however, I am not sure how periodontists do in the private practice setting.

I understand it's important to do what I am passionate about but I also understand the dental business setting has changed quite significantly in the last 15 years and I do not want to pursue my passion of periodontics blindly.


TL;DR Is specializing in perio worth it in the current state of dentistry? How much are current periodontists making? What kind of setting are they working in/types of procedures are they performing?
 

punchdrunk7

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Do what you love! My GPR program director is a periodontists and is leaving to pursue a private practice opportunity. I know its not for nothing either $$$. There are plenty of procedures that GP's don't want to touch, I myself will refer to him as much as possible. Implant placement is only one aspect of very busy periodontal offices and you'll still do plenty of those as well. Good luck!
 

saFTF

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Do what you love! My GPR program director is a periodontists and is leaving to pursue a private practice opportunity. I know its not for nothing either $$$. There are plenty of procedures that GP's don't want to touch, I myself will refer to him as much as possible. Implant placement is only one aspect of very busy periodontal offices and you'll still do plenty of those as well. Good luck!

Wow a periodontist as a GPR director, that's very cool. Thank you for your reply!
 

giepfuo

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Copy that.Implant placement is only one aspect of very busy periodontal offices and you'll still do plenty of those as well. Good luck!
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DDS360

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Follow your passion, but make sure to speak to private paractice periodontists to set your expectations right. I guess I posted ADA 2015 report, and as you can see specialty on average do well. Location makes a huge difference though, because it could be a different story if you go to Southern California. If you love perio, then numbers shouldn't matter and you just need to do your research to pick the right place to practice.

ADA 2015 report on specialty's average income

Table 3: Annual Net Income of Specialists in Private Practice, 2014

Type of Dentist Average

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons $413,410
Endodontists $325,840
Orthodontists and Dentofacial Orthopedists $301,760
Pediatric Dentists $347,310
Periodontists $257,960

Source: American Dental Association, Health Policy Institute, 2015 Survey of Dental Practice.
Copyright © 2015 American Dental Association.
 
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