Feb 2, 2013
1
0
Status
Medical Student
Hi everyone,

Long time lurker, first time poster. I was wondering if anyone had any thoughts about the University of Cincinnati IM program, especially regarding overall training, camaraderie, work environment, etc.. I have been searching the other threads, and there really hasn't been much talk about UC for 5+ years. I know they got a new PD since then and have been through a lot of changes, so I would love to hear how they're doing now. FYI, I'm between this, Case Western, and Ohio State for my #1, so any help is much appreciated! Thanks in advance.
 
Sep 4, 2013
1
0
Status
I am too late for the above med student who has matched by now, but I wanted to reply for anyone in the future interested in UC. I am a former resident that just graduated this year, and I had a great experience at UC. I am actually kind of sad that I am done with residency because I enjoyed it so much. The program director is amazing. He is innovative and very receptive to resident feedback. He created the longblock which is one of the best parts of this program. It consists of a year-long block of electives spanning your second and third years where you act as a primary care doctor for a panel of patients. During longblock you have time to dedicate towards research (if you want to), enjoy most of your weekends off, and study for boards. They have a board review course throughout the longblock year headed by one of the associate program directors who happens to be a genius.

In terms of the camaraderie, I became close friends with a lot of fellow residents. Most of my time outside of the hospital was spent hanging out with them. The program really tries to attract patient-centered residents, which translates to nice residents. In terms of the city of Cincinnati, I have been pleasantly surprised. I had never been to Cincinnati prior to my interview and wasn't sure what to expect. There is actually a lot to do for people who are single or people with families- good restaurants, the zoo, the Cardinals (free tickets available through the department), modern art museum and more. A lot of residents live on the east side of town, the Oakley/Hyde Park area, which is really nice for young professionals and an easy drive to the hospital.

I really think the UC IM program is a hidden gem. I interviewed for residency all over the country, and I got a good vibe from the program when I came to interview. Now that I am all done I fully understand how awesome this place is, and I am so glad that I went with my gut and chose UC. Hope this helps!
 

IMPD

5+ Year Member
Dec 11, 2012
380
417
Status
Academic Administration
I am too late for the above med student who has matched by now, but I wanted to reply for anyone in the future interested in UC. I am a former resident that just graduated this year, and I had a great experience at UC. I am actually kind of sad that I am done with residency because I enjoyed it so much. The program director is amazing. He is innovative and very receptive to resident feedback. He created the longblock which is one of the best parts of this program. It consists of a year-long block of electives spanning your second and third years where you act as a primary care doctor for a panel of patients. During longblock you have time to dedicate towards research (if you want to), enjoy most of your weekends off, and study for boards. They have a board review course throughout the longblock year headed by one of the associate program directors who happens to be a genius.

In terms of the camaraderie, I became close friends with a lot of fellow residents. Most of my time outside of the hospital was spent hanging out with them. The program really tries to attract patient-centered residents, which translates to nice residents. In terms of the city of Cincinnati, I have been pleasantly surprised. I had never been to Cincinnati prior to my interview and wasn’t sure what to expect. There is actually a lot to do for people who are single or people with families- good restaurants, the zoo, the Cardinals (free tickets available through the department), modern art museum and more. A lot of residents live on the east side of town, the Oakley/Hyde Park area, which is really nice for young professionals and an easy drive to the hospital.

I really think the UC IM program is a hidden gem. I interviewed for residency all over the country, and I got a good vibe from the program when I came to interview. Now that I am all done I fully understand how awesome this place is, and I am so glad that I went with my gut and chose UC. Hope this helps!
The long block is legendary. Looked at doing it here. Going with 4+1 instead. Long block is the bomb though.

Also, their work in Reinvention of Rounds is outstanding. A model.
 
Jan 26, 2013
13
0
Status
Resident [Any Field]
I am too late for the above med student who has matched by now, but I wanted to reply for anyone in the future interested in UC. I am a former resident that just graduated this year, and I had a great experience at UC. I am actually kind of sad that I am done with residency because I enjoyed it so much. The program director is amazing. He is innovative and very receptive to resident feedback. He created the longblock which is one of the best parts of this program. It consists of a year-long block of electives spanning your second and third years where you act as a primary care doctor for a panel of patients. During longblock you have time to dedicate towards research (if you want to), enjoy most of your weekends off, and study for boards. They have a board review course throughout the longblock year headed by one of the associate program directors who happens to be a genius.

In terms of the camaraderie, I became close friends with a lot of fellow residents. Most of my time outside of the hospital was spent hanging out with them. The program really tries to attract patient-centered residents, which translates to nice residents. In terms of the city of Cincinnati, I have been pleasantly surprised. I had never been to Cincinnati prior to my interview and wasn’t sure what to expect. There is actually a lot to do for people who are single or people with families- good restaurants, the zoo, the Cardinals (free tickets available through the department), modern art museum and more. A lot of residents live on the east side of town, the Oakley/Hyde Park area, which is really nice for young professionals and an easy drive to the hospital.

I really think the UC IM program is a hidden gem. I interviewed for residency all over the country, and I got a good vibe from the program when I came to interview. Now that I am all done I fully understand how awesome this place is, and I am so glad that I went with my gut and chose UC. Hope this helps!
The Reds! Cardinals are in St. Louis.
 

dozitgetchahi

10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Oct 21, 2008
1,583
611
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
What nobody likes to talk about is the fact that the 'longblock' necessitates everyone doing something like 16-18 straight months (don't remember the exact number) of wards/ICU as PGY 1/2s. I liked the program a lot overall, but that fact alone led me to drop it way down on my rank list - and several other people I knew who interviewed there felt the same way.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Crayola227

shapeshifter13

5+ Year Member
Oct 26, 2012
45
0
Status
Pre-Medical
BUMP! Anyone have anything to add about the IM program as of late? I will be interviewing there soon.
 
Nov 20, 2017
2
0
I'm at UC! I was going to write up what I thought but it would be basically the same as the second poster from 2013. The PD is still super cool and inspirational, long block is still amazing, Cincinnati is still a fun city, everyone here is still really nice. Training is awesome and I got fellowship interviews all over the place. I think overall for the residency, they nailed the balance between service and education.

The thing about the 16-18 months of straight wards is not accurate. I got 3 months of elective during intern year, 6 months elective second year, 4 months elective 3rd year (plus a month of vacation each year). Obviously electives were a little more concentrated during the long block, but I never did more than 2-3 months between vacations or electives.

It's a great program, totally a hidden gem! If anyone has more questions, let me know!
 

shapeshifter13

5+ Year Member
Oct 26, 2012
45
0
Status
Pre-Medical
I'm at UC! I was going to write up what I thought but it would be basically the same as the second poster from 2013. The PD is still super cool and inspirational, long block is still amazing, Cincinnati is still a fun city, everyone here is still really nice. Training is awesome and I got fellowship interviews all over the place. I think overall for the residency, they nailed the balance between service and education.

The thing about the 16-18 months of straight wards is not accurate. I got 3 months of elective during intern year, 6 months elective second year, 4 months elective 3rd year (plus a month of vacation each year). Obviously electives were a little more concentrated during the long block, but I never did more than 2-3 months between vacations or electives.

It's a great program, totally a hidden gem! If anyone has more questions, let me know!
That's great to know, thanks! I am excited about my interview coming up. Dr. Warm seems like a great PD and I am looking forward to meeting him soon. Can you comment on the range of pathology you see, the patient demographic and scut work involved?
 
Nov 20, 2017
2
0
Range of pathology: very wide! We're the main tertiary care/university hospital for a very large catchment area (the entire city of Cincinnati plus at least an hour in any direction; add another hour or two for our VA's catchment area) so all the good (and weird and complicated) cases tend to get shipped here. We still get plenty of bread and butter from the locals but plenty of darn cool stuff too. The one thing I don't get regular exposure to is BMT/liquid tumors--they're on a fellow-run service that residents don't routinely rotate on, but you can do it as an elective without trouble, and most people interested in Hem/Onc have done this (I just haven't). When I read MKSAP, I feel like I've seen at least a case or two of almost all the things in there.

Patient demographic: These are my own estimates so could be off a little, but the resident primary care clinic is probably mostly locals, which tends to be more of an indigent population around the hospital. The university hospital sees mostly a mix of black and white patients (small Asian and Hispanic populations here), and more of a mix of different socioeconomic status. The VA (like all VAs) has mostly old white men, mostly from more rural areas around Cincinnati.

Scut work: I think a normal amount? As an intern obviously you'll be writing notes, putting in orders, calling consults, etc. You don't draw labs. You don't arrange anything for dispo (SW takes care of everything). Most of Cincinnati is on Epic and records are easily available in Care Everywhere through Epic, so you don't really ever have to request records. I think that's most of the scut things I see residents sometimes having to do at different hospitals, but if there's anything else you're specifically wondering about, feel free to ask.

Hope you have a great interview!
 

shapeshifter13

5+ Year Member
Oct 26, 2012
45
0
Status
Pre-Medical
Range of pathology: very wide! We're the main tertiary care/university hospital for a very large catchment area (the entire city of Cincinnati plus at least an hour in any direction; add another hour or two for our VA's catchment area) so all the good (and weird and complicated) cases tend to get shipped here. We still get plenty of bread and butter from the locals but plenty of darn cool stuff too. The one thing I don't get regular exposure to is BMT/liquid tumors--they're on a fellow-run service that residents don't routinely rotate on, but you can do it as an elective without trouble, and most people interested in Hem/Onc have done this (I just haven't). When I read MKSAP, I feel like I've seen at least a case or two of almost all the things in there.

Patient demographic: These are my own estimates so could be off a little, but the resident primary care clinic is probably mostly locals, which tends to be more of an indigent population around the hospital. The university hospital sees mostly a mix of black and white patients (small Asian and Hispanic populations here), and more of a mix of different socioeconomic status. The VA (like all VAs) has mostly old white men, mostly from more rural areas around Cincinnati.

Scut work: I think a normal amount? As an intern obviously you'll be writing notes, putting in orders, calling consults, etc. You don't draw labs. You don't arrange anything for dispo (SW takes care of everything). Most of Cincinnati is on Epic and records are easily available in Care Everywhere through Epic, so you don't really ever have to request records. I think that's most of the scut things I see residents sometimes having to do at different hospitals, but if there's anything else you're specifically wondering about, feel free to ask.

Hope you have a great interview!
Thanks! I appreciate all the information!