Walgreens Pharmacy Manager job offer

Discussion in 'Pharmacy' started by PharmD227, Dec 8, 2018.

  1. PharmD227

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    So I was just offered a position with Walgreens. I will be a staff pharmacist and get trained for 3 weeks. After the 3 weeks, i will be promoted to pharmacy manager. I just got licensed this September. I have some intern experience and had a rotation with Walgreens. For the past 2 months, I have been working part time at an independent pharmacy. I'm feeling somewhat anxious considering I'm a recent grad. Will 3 weeks training be enough? If anyone has any advice about working as a RXM at Walgreens, I would love to hear it. Thank You!
     
  2. awval999

    awval999 New Member
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    Well, congrats on the job and getting full time hours as a new grad! Not easy in this environment.

    Curiously... what was the wage?

    Yes, it's normal to be anxious, as this will be your first full-time pharmacist big kid job. And yes, it's going to be difficult, so hopefully they are paying you well!
     
  3. mentos

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    I had two classmates who had to become PIC when they were new grads, one at Wags and one at CVS. They both quit within a month. Best of luck to you, maybe you'll like it. But it will be a struggle.
     
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  4. OP
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    PharmD227

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    Thank you! Salary is 125k. As a staff at that store i would've gotten 108k. The store is located in a saturated area but the store itself isn't as busy so hopefully it won't be too bad.
     
  5. OP
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    PharmD227

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    Do you happen to know the reason(s) as to why they quit?
     
  6. CetiAlphaFive

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    Sad times when a full time job at Walgreens is considered rare
     
  7. mentos

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    Cause it sucked. They got paid marginally more than staff rph but had way more responsibility and things to worry about. Too stressful. They were satisfied as staff rph but couldn't stand being PIC.
     
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  8. pencilandpen

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    wow i am only a staff pharmacist my base salary is 120k with 40 hrs per week, plus more if over time when i cover for holidays or other sick call offs. My manager makes $10/hr more than me and has 45 hours per week.

    god knows how long my position will last ..... I know people around me are starting to get their hours cut to 35 or even 30 per week.....
    the only thing saving me so far is probably I am at a super busy store that no other pharmacist want to be at hahaha.

    oh also how many hours per week do you work and whats your hourly rate?

    three weeks training is no where near enough to grasp all that there is to being a manager ,but hey at least they give you 3 weeks of training. I have heard that CVS doesnt even give 1 week of training and just throw you right to the wolves
     
    #8 pencilandpen, Dec 8, 2018
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2018
  9. Ace41690

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    Not sure how true this is, but it seems like wag widened the spread between staff and rxm (hence it is now "worth it" to manage).

    108k puts him at $52/hr which is the "new" rate in some markets for new grads/new hires. 125k puts him at 58-59/hr-ish.

    Raise for rxm used to be only $2/hr i think. I actually like this if its true. There should be a bigger difference between staff/float and rxm
     
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  10. princeafrica

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    I'm a pharmacy tech and Walgreens and your tech will love you if you are fast at verifying prescriptions.

    Whenever we have floaters its the death of me. I type up all these scripts so fast only for them to be stuck in the verification line and then I get customers yelling at me "It's been 15 minutes where's my med"
     
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  11. johnpharm01

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    What's your % of wrong drugs and wrong directions on rxs you enter and fill?

    For OP, I see you did not list technician experience in your post. When I was a tech I had the chance to work with pharmacists and find the one that I would like to model my practice after. It would take a few pages to help you out. Best of luck.
     
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  12. princeafrica

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    The first couple months I was getting a lot of them wrong haha. But it's been 2 years now and my PIC said I get like 5-10 wrong per month so I think I am pretty efficient. I double check my work
     
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  13. wagrxm2000

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    More responsibilities?

    My responsibilities keep going down to the point I'm not sure why there even is an rxm. All metrics are now controlled by pulse meetings. I don't do any mtm since that's the staffs job. Techs make the schedule. And the list goes on.....

    I'm just a pretty face now.
     
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  14. aznhomieboi1689

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    I was in your shoes , PM me if you have any specific questions !
     
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  15. sozetone

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    They are taking you because you can be exploited. You will work for a lower salary, and the "old timers" already know how aweful the PIC position is. I should know, ive been one for a little while. So in other words, they are giving these jobs to new grads who dont know any better, hiring them at a lower pay rate and giving them less PTO/benefits....etc. you will never know the difference. That said, you will burnout faster with less PTO and money to motivate you. It's becoming revolving doors. The company just needs a body with a license to satisfy the state PIC change requirement. Think to yourself , if they REALLY cared about hiring TOP talent, why would they be taking so many new grads fresh off the boat? My resume is a mile long with great stuff....all managerial. You though WILL get the job before me every time....my resume will go in the garbage.
     
  16. Apotheker2015

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    How is your new job going? Did you end up getting promoted to Pharmacy Manager?
     
  17. OP
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    PharmD227

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    I just finished training with a manager in another store and I will be starting as pharmacy manager at my store tomorrow actually. Fingers crossed lol
     
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  18. Apotheker2015

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    CONGRATS!!! How did they structure your schedule? 10 hour days?
    Did the pharmacy manager you trained with give you more insight on the interaction with the store manager?
     
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  19. gopoopants

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    Lets us know how it goes.
     
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  20. OP
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    PharmD227

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    Will do!!
     
  21. OP
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    PharmD227

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    Thank you! So my store is open 10-6 sat and sun, 10-7 mon and 9-7 tues-fri. The hours arent bad but I don't have any 6 or 7 hr shifts. I'm okay with that considering I won't have to do any 12 hr shifts. The rxm i trained with was great, but there's only so much you can teach in a week.
     
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  22. MrBonita

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    Being a manager sucks. Anything goes wrong and your license is scarred for life. Good luck getting a job after that.
     
  23. Deja

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    I hear people say one of the down side of being a manager is that if anything goes wrong and your license is scarred for life all the time

    what exactly can go wrong that will affect your license and not the staffs license (beside I guess selling too many c2s and get in trouble with the DEA, but that shouldn't happen if you know what you are doing)? and how many of you guy actually saw an manager's license being "scarred"?
     
  24. wagrxm2000

    wagrxm2000 Do not respond to this
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    It's pretty much impossible for anything to go wrong.

    You want job security, be a manager.
     
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  25. Drugsarefun2350

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    i mean even the pharmacists/pharmacy managers at the stores at walgreens and cvs in Florida that got their DEA suspended during the peak of the florida pill mill era didn't have to do anything besides take a CE on ethics or some nonsense like that
     
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  26. Wickett

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    Previous poster is being a bit over dramatic, but it's on you for the pharmacy to be compliant and above board. If the store gets docked for something on a state board inspection, it's on you. Just be diligent, keep close accounts on your controls, make sure your techs follow correct procedure on counseling, etc and you will be ok.

    The most common things to look out for are board inspections (are your control scripts properly marked, valid and on hand for an inspector to see, employee and store licensing up to date, etc). Misfills and/or lack of following proper counseling procedures are the most likely things that can trip you up.

    Look up state board fines in your state to get an idea of what commonly gets a pic in trouble. Most common in my state are techs not getting the pharmacist to offer counseling on a new rx. Drill it in your techs and other pharmacists to follow your state's regulations on that.

    I had a bad misfill at my store when I was off on vacation, and it was largely due to the floater RPh not offering counseling on a new med. I had emails showing I had reminded this particular RPh and others to follow protocol, as well as a write up on a clerk for not informing the RPh if a script was new.

    The board cleared the store and myself and issued a warning to the floater RPh. Don't be a jerk about it, but you have to protect yourself and have things in writing that show you're doing your job to properly dispense meds.

    Being a PIC can be rewarding and offer a layer of job security, but don't take it lightly. You aren't there to simply fill meds like a staff RPh would.
     
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  27. Deja

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    was it the PIC that missed the dose or another staff? if it was the PIC then it doesn't matter if he was a PIC or not... I did not open and read the pdf
     
  28. Deja

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    it's not just the previous poster, I see that excuse all the time on SDN... and all the things you listed, the regulat RPH can also get in trouble for... I guess the only difference is that the manager can be liable for other RPH's mistakes but as you pointed out, as long as you have documentation that you are enforcing the rules then it's fine
     
  29. Sine Cura

    Sine Cura 10 seconds or less
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    Depending on the board there is a non-zero risk of the PIC getting hit for the shortcomings of other pharmacists or staff even if they are floaters. Like if there is a significant error like dispensing a fake Rx for a controlled substance being filled or a dispensing error in general, what remediation did you implement and did you document it? If so then you might be off the hook when the board comes investigating
     
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  30. Secret_Informant

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    Find the FLBOP recording and the agenda list for October 2018. The FLBOP usually meets bimonthly. You'll get your answers then.

    If it is not there, then it must have been removed for some reason. Probably to protect the individual.

    To address your comment about the PIC responsibility, PICs are responsible for their whole team, including technicians and pharmacists as well as the overall operation of the pharmacy. After all, they are the Pharmacist in Charge (common sense description).

    Find a job description for a typical Pharmacy Manager or PIC position and read the list of duties and responsibilities if you still have doubts. If you have any other questions, feel free to list them here or (if you are still doubtful) speak to Pharmacy Managers and/or District Managers for your area for more specific information about their daily challenges and possible changes to the workload at that particular store. Workload, circumstances, patients, and management attitudes vary based on where you work and what setting you are in (for example: rural vs urban). That is, if you are still interested in retail given the current changes in healthcare: Amazon and Apple.

    Under tremendous pressure, the one thing you do not document could make-or-break your career (especially if the workload is unmanageable or unreasonable. Reasonability seems to be based on a commonly accepted definition of scripts per day or patient load, but what is considered "a reasonable workload" may not apply to you. You could be comfortable with what is reasonable and move forward with it, but what store managers and other pharmacists (management or not) consider "reasonable" may be too much to handle. Not everyone loves retail.

    Assuming you are a pharmacy student, this is not dramatism @Deja, but things you must consider and do to protect yourself and your (future) pharmacist license. Store inspections are also random and no longer at predetermined intervals, putting more pressure on pharmacists to perform.
     
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    #30 Secret_Informant, Jan 12, 2019 at 7:30 AM
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2019 at 7:54 AM
  31. Deja

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    dude wtf lol you listed an example and doesn't even know if the mistake was made by the PIC or not? (if it was the PIC, then your example is invalid) if you are going to give examples, make it clear, I don't want to do additional research

    also we are not discussing responsibilities ... I'm talking about the managers risk of getting in trouble and having license scarred vs that of a staff because it's a commonly used excuse on SDN for not being an manager

    I've been a pharmacist for over 5 years and have trained techs and sometimes taught managers things they didn't know (also being asked to be an manager on multiple occasions)... you make it seem like the staff doesn't do **** or know the responsbilities and doesn't have to manage techs... Idk what kind of **** staff you've been working with

    and thank you for the non-answer
     
    #31 Deja, Jan 12, 2019 at 7:44 AM
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2019 at 7:53 AM
  32. Deja

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    yeah so people are just being overtly dramatic about the risks... the down side of being an manager is that you have to deal with the DM more about all the metrics
     
  33. Secret_Informant

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    @Deja Why have your designation as a student on your SDN profile if you are in fact a pharmacist? That is quite misleading and nontransparent.

    Swearing on a forum also does not make you sound professional, even if the information seems incorrect to you; I see pre-pharmacy students and undecided students swear quite a bit on SDN forums to get their point across. Just because you did not see it does not mean it did not happen. As you said, documentation is important.

    To be nice, I will answer your question. It was the staff member that made the mistake, but the PIC missed the dosing error. The PIC was put before the Board with the outcome I described; the outcome of the staff member was unknown.

    With that said, I have a life and a license exam to focus on. Thank you and have a wonderful day.
     
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    #33 Secret_Informant, Jan 12, 2019 at 7:55 AM
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2019 at 8:43 AM
  34. Deja

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    because I never changed it... sue me... look at my join date

    even if I was just a student, you still didn't answer the question that was posed

    I see you edited your response after I replied...

    just read your edit...although it still doesn't really address the risks of being manager vs staff except for maybe to your point that manager is under more stress which could lead to them making more mistakes
     
    #34 Deja, Jan 12, 2019 at 8:11 AM
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2019 at 8:24 AM
  35. johnpharm01

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    Bottom line a pharmacy manager has more responsibility legally (board regs and rules) and corporate responsibility. New grads make "good" managers because they don't know better. You can check your board regs for those responsibilities and you will learn the corporate responsibilities easily the biggest one is boosting profits. Meanwhile, what will the tools you will use to manage? Can you hire and fire independently? Make the schedule? Authorize more hours? Change the work flow? Change pharmacy policies?

    If BOPs provided greater oversight, more of the "successful" managers wouldn't survive the scrutiny. Best case scenario you survive and dodge bullets worst case you become a scapegoat.
     
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  36. wagrxm2000

    wagrxm2000 Do not respond to this
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    This thread is ridiculous. If you work for Walgreens, they go over the top to make sure everything is done perfectly.

    If you actually somehow get in trouble, you are intentionally doing something wrong.
     
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  37. MrBonita

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    Basically, you will have more responsibility. If you do not have your control medications and billing done accurately, chances are you can get a fine by the board of pharmacy and it will show up next to your license looking at it online. I am only speaking about the State of California. I would gladly post examples but last time I did that people did not like it since it displayed actual people's names and it was not nice.

    Also, the invoices you sign as a PIC. If there is any discrepancies or your pharmacy ordered something it was not licensed to order, that too can lead to the board writing you up and placing the document next to your online license. It's not a big deal, but when you apply for work, employers will not like that. I knew a person who worked at Cedar's Sinai. A major hospital brand for celebrities. The pharmacist had a blemish on their license and when the director found out, they had the pharmacist let go. It was nothing serious but that's what a blemish can do.

    On the other hand. I had a pharmacist who pulled a gun on someone and it appeared on their license. That person was still employed at the independent pharmacy I was working at. The manager had no issues with him doing that.
     
  38. Apotheker2015

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    Make sure to profusely thank that Pharmacy Manager for training you. That was a professional courtesy. She/he did not get paid extra for your tagging along.
    Follow SOP diligently. If anything ever happens, that is one of the first questions that comes up - "Were you following procedure? Did you deviate from procedure?"
    Have an initial meeting with your staff and include the store manager in it. Have everyone acknowledge on paper that they understand every SOP. If they do not, please come to you for clarification. Keep records of every acknowledgement and communication.
    Make sure that you understand the law. Walgreens builds their policy based upon your state's pharmacy law. Though, if you follow all SOPs, and make sure everyone does, then you should be fine.

    It is a good idea to self-audit periodically. That way, you will be audit-ready at all times, and you will know what your BOP expects if they ever come around. I imagine Walgreens has their own self-audit procedure.

    Keep an open communication line with your Store Manager, District Manager and build a professional relationship with other Pharmacy Managers. Seek a mentor, a go-to person. My guess is that the Pharmacy Manager who trained you has a good standing and reputation as Pharmacy Manager. When situations arise, always consult with your Store Manager, District Manager and why not - the Pharmacy Manager who trained you.

    Report ALL ERRORS whether the error makes it out the door or not. Doing that does not make you the bad guy.

    Keep us posted!

    Apotheker2015
     
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  39. Deja

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    As a staff you also have to make sure controls and billing are done correctly... staff also sign for invoices.... so only the manager get in trouble if the staff make those mistakes? Im actually curious... I guess staff also doesn't have to worry about other staffs mistakes but an manager does
     
  40. Wickett

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    I don't know how all companies do it, but with mine the PIC is expected to print off a report every month that shows every control ordered and cross check it with all the signed invoices that were filed the previous month. It is on the PIC to catch any discrepancies and report them. While the PIC wouldn't get in trouble for a mistake they didn't make or for catching a tech or other RPh ordering a control, shredding the invoice and then keeping the med, the PIC would get in trouble for not doing the monthly check and catching it. You still have the overarching responsibility to oversee the pharmacy and show you did your utmost to ensure everything is above board.
     
  41. OP
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    PharmD227

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    So today was my first day and the entire pharmacy was flipped upside down. I got there this morning with so much to do. I didn't have time to do anything besides verify and answer phone calls. I don't even know where to start and I'm stressed already. Tomorrow I'm hoping to get in there early so i can finish a few things. Im not very experienced so everything is still new to me.
     
  42. Apotheker2015

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    First things first - focus on verifying accurately, and at a speed that does not compromise patient safety. Hopefully, your pharmacy runs on its own. Encourage folks to do a good job, and observe. Do not attempt to fix anything yet; unless it is a blatant violation of the law.
     
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  43. gopoopants

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    Seems like you did good and focused on what was most important.
     
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  44. Apotheker2015

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    How are you adjusting? Keep us posted! :) Kuddos to you for not shying away from the challenge. You will be fine!
     
  45. OP
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    PharmD227

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    So it's getting a little better. I still have a lot to learn but all my co workers are awesome. The store manager is especially great, she's relatively new as well so we're learning together.
     
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  46. Apotheker2015

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    I think that you secured a really good situation for yourself. That's awesome! RXM is the way to go. It's job security. You will eventually get the hang of it and they will offer you to run a higher tier store. $$$
     
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  47. Drugsarefun2350

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    really no point in taking higher tier stores now days, they cut everyones bonus in half this past FY18 and most are thinking that bonuses will be decreased even further if not go all the way to zero in the near future, only reason to take a busy store was for bonus
     
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  48. Apotheker2015

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    Sure, your opinion is valid. The fact remains that every market is different. Hard-to-staff areas still exist. Walgreens just offered me a job as market pharmacist in a desirable metro area that is highly saturated - with 40 hours per week guaranteed. They also offered me a pharmacy manager position in a hard-to-staff area outside the metro for quite a bit of money and bonus. There are opportunities out there. You just have to find them.
     
  49. Drugsarefun2350

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    Yes that is true that every market is different in saturation and slight differences in pay. When I was in south Florida I was making about 5 dollars an hour less than in north Florida. However, the cut to bonuses was company wide.
     
  50. Apotheker2015

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
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    Pharmacist
    I get that, and that's life. I am just trying to celebrate OP's little victory here. Let's not rain on his/her parade. S/he needs to be able to do this job for foreseeable future and then some.
     
    PharmD227 likes this.

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