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kid123

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My school reports marks on my transcripts in percentages. When I go to convert these percentages on a 4.0 GPA scale, it's around ~2.77 (barely meets the cutoff of 2.7). Whereas if I take those percentages and convert them on a 7.0 GPA Scale (as per GEMSAS), then my GPA is fairly high ~6.3/7 (well over the cutoff of 5/7).

My MCAT is a 500.

I have decent ECs (specialist shadowing, student government, research, etc...)

I'm just wondering, are schools in Australia likely to convert my percentage grades to a 4.0 GPA Scale (and compare that to the 2.7 cutoff)? Or would they convert it to a 7.0 Scale?

I'm asking this question because I find it really odd how converting between GPA scales has the potential to make my crappy application look like a great one.
 

Domperidone

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just apply. See what you get.
There's even schools (the 6 year ones) that don't even look at MCAT or undergrad scores, just your high school ones. Most schools won't care about your ECs by the way, just that you meet cut-off. You be on the line for a few, based on the MCAT alone. There's no such thing as a crappy medical school application when you're an international full fee paying student in Australia. Unless you want to be picky.
 
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gather_roses

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My school reports marks on my transcripts in percentages. When I go to convert these percentages on a 4.0 GPA scale, it's around ~2.77 (barely meets the cutoff of 2.7). Whereas if I take those percentages and convert them on a 7.0 GPA Scale (as per GEMSAS), then my GPA is fairly high ~6.3/7 (well over the cutoff of 5/7).

My MCAT is a 500.

I have decent ECs (specialist shadowing, student government, research, etc...)

I'm just wondering, are schools in Australia likely to convert my percentage grades to a 4.0 GPA Scale (and compare that to the 2.7 cutoff)? Or would they convert it to a 7.0 Scale?

I'm asking this question because I find it really odd how converting between GPA scales has the potential to make my crappy application look like a great one.

Just apply. However, my MCAT was a 503 ..maybe 501 ?
...and this made many schools not consider me. I got into Griffith, and a conditional offer to Deakin (which I could not fulfill - could not get 125 on physics/chem). My GPA was something like a 3.8, h, and I have a Master's degree. I'm a borderline candidate for Canada, but I'm old and cannot wait around for luck to align with a better MCAT.

However, being old/a non-traditional student has helped me. It sounds like you may also have lots of great stories. I got the impression that they care less about what you've done, and more about if you are a critical thinker. It will also depend on how you interview. I was told my interview was incredibly strong, and thought it could make up for my MCAT. So, I will echo what everyone else says - just apply. Something in your application might stand out, and they seem to be looking for people who would do well in medical school & as a doctor, but haven't, for whatever reason, been able to meet traditional requirements.
 

Domperidone

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...honestly. they're not fussy. I wouldn't think too hard or deeply about it. it's not like applying to schools in the US (MD or DO) or Canada.

According to some schools, you meet minimum criteria you get in. It's that simple. There's no strings. Fine print maybe - but you each accept your own risks, which I'm not going to go into here.

If prospective students don't meet quota a particular year and you're borderline, it may tip things your way. again, there are schools that won't even care about whether you even took the MCAT or attended undergrad.

If you really want to get into a medical school offshore in a country such as a Australia, as a native English speaker from a Western country, you will.
It's really not that difficult. So, don't over think it.

If you want to have choices, then re-take the MCAT.
Many people have before.
 

cantbekant

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If prospective students don't meet quota a particular year and you're borderline, it may tip things your way. again, there are schools that won't even care about whether you even took the MCAT or attended undergrad.

Unbelievable. Which schools would these be? Additionally, would being a doctor from a lesser known university be a hurdle at any point in one's career?
 

Domperidone

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lol. unbelievable in what sense exactly? yay you can't wait to attend as if your MCAT and undergrad degree never happened?

go to worldwidemed.co, and you can find out what schools match your scores to your heart's desire. there's a small number of direct high school entry medical schools. they're 6 year programs as opposed to 4 years, that's partly why.

I would be more worried that you would struggle to get your degree.
6 year direct high school entry programs are meant to be much more supportive, because you'll be with high school grads who entered medical school directly. Doesn't mean it's easy to pass, but you can take your chances.

some of the medical students on these forums believe that their med school 'brand' matters (they're usually the grads of 'big' name Australian schools). so it's a very subjective topic. I came from a 'big' name Aussie school, when I did my electives or subI's no one had heard of it, despite it having so many 'international' alumni, the stigma of coming from an off-shore school trumped that. So, in my opinion, no it doesn't matter. It's all off shore.

Sometimes it helps having critical mass and bigger name med schools tend to have more direct partnerships with American and Canadian med schools to make it easier to get rotations in those places. BUT. Your board scores matter most. If you struggle with the MCAT now, I know there's many schools of thought on this, you may have a rocky time with the steps. You really have to explore why you struggle with that standardized exam, because the steps are twice as long. there's one mcat, there's multiple standardized exams you have to get through to match at home.
 
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