astrostellar

Eternal Pre-Med
2+ Year Member
Jul 10, 2016
160
259
Alaska
Status
Pre-Medical
I'm full-time military working rotating shifts (non-medical job) and right now, I'm not getting out until 2020. I'm taking classes 1-2 at a time. Then, I'm going to finish my degree and do a post-bacc. I literally do not think I can apply for med school until 2023.

Right now, that seems EONS away, even though I know it's not. Does anybody have any placating suggestions to keep me from going insane while I finish my contract and also my degree at a snail's pace? I have some spare time. I'm pursing a phlebotomy certification. What else can I do to get involved in medicine in the meantime? Anything I can do to prep?

I seriously just want to bang a fast-forward button right now, haha. I'm already nearly 26.
 

QofQuimica

Seriously, dude, I think you're overreacting....
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10+ Year Member
Oct 12, 2004
18,915
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Florida/Fellowship
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Fellow [Any Field], Attending Physician
Find some kind of volunteer gig (medical or nonmedical) that you are passionate about, and do it. Even if it's just mentoring younger servicemen/women. Take classes just for the sheer sake of learning something interesting. And build strong relationships with your friends and family. In the end, those are the things that will make your life meaningful. There's no rush. Medicine will still be around in six years.
 
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trev5150

Whoa hold on there sis. How far into a degree are you that you would still have to do a postbacc? Just get out when you're done and change your major. IF your previous work has nothing to do with medicine and you're really committed don't waste money or academic effort on on stuff you'll never use. Use your GI Bill wisely. If you're really close to done with your bacc (30-45 credit area) then yeah finish it, but if you're still fresh or soph standing don't.

In the meantime, do as the others said, read a ton, PT (you'll be surprised how much time you can burn off at the gym).

Your enlistment will go quickly if your MOS is a busy one, like mine was - always in the field, on the flight line, in the GCS flying, at the rifle range, deployed. When you look back at it it will seem like a flash in the pan, believe me. I did 5.5 years 13 years later is seems like just a moment in my life.
 

Matthew9Thirtyfive

*breathes in* boi
Moderator
2+ Year Member
Jan 11, 2016
15,106
22,382
Status
Medical Student
I'm full-time military working rotating shifts (non-medical job) and right now, I'm not getting out until 2020. I'm taking classes 1-2 at a time. Then, I'm going to finish my degree and do a post-bacc. I literally do not think I can apply for med school until 2023.

Right now, that seems EONS away, even though I know it's not. Does anybody have any placating suggestions to keep me from going insane while I finish my contract and also my degree at a snail's pace? I have some spare time. I'm pursing a phlebotomy certification. What else can I do to get involved in medicine in the meantime? Anything I can do to prep?

I seriously just want to bang a fast-forward button right now, haha. I'm already nearly 26.
I finished my degree while active duty. It took me 2 years to do my entire major, which was only like 45 credits, so I understand the snail pace frustration. Not sure what service you are or your job, but when I passed my four year mark, I was blown away at how fast it went, even though it seemed to go by so slowly while I was in it.

You can find plenty of things to do. I'm guessing you work a swing shift. I just organized an "adopt-a-route" with Meals on Wheels for my command. There are tons of 5ks, marathons, and Spartan type races here, and I'm sure there are some around you (check with MWR--they usually have a list). These may not be directly related to medicine, but they will pass the time and look good on your app.

As far as medical experience goes, see if your command has a medical response team or a medical training team. At my command, people with no medical experience were generally put on the training team and taught just enough to know how to evaluate the response team, but you can work your way up. I was an OR tech before the Navy, so I went right to the MRT. You can also just go hang out in medical and see if they have any ways to let you get some experience. Ask your command about going TAD. I know people who have done that.

Just get creative and don't be afraid to ask. Make sure you're qualified and not a ****bag so you can get hooked up.