Will you get a vaccine?

  • Yes

    Votes: 247 87.9%
  • No

    Votes: 34 12.1%

  • Total voters
    281

Shimmy8

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My state is planning on having a vaccine distributed and available to us mid-December. Has sparked a lot of discussion...
 
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Spikebd

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I’ll request novavax, as I’d prefer not to be in the mRNA vaccine group. Cool tech, but I’d like to wait a bit to see if there are as-of-yet unknown side effects.
 
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AMEHigh

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I’m in a covid vaccine trial so yes. I’ll get whatever is approved and recommended.
 
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Real question is whether there will be enough vaccines for you
 
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ambiturner

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For people who are wary, what are the potential downsides (other than Bill Gates/mind control)? In the history of vaccines, my understanding is that the worst outcomes have involved lots of people getting the disease being immunized against (polio). Getting COVID would be unfortunate, but certainly not as bad as polio. Are there other things I'm missing?
 
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MirrorTodd

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For people who are wary, what are the potential downsides (other than Bill Gates/mind control)? In the history of vaccines, my understanding is that the worst outcomes have involved lots of people getting the disease being immunized against (polio). Getting COVID would be unfortunate, but certainly not as bad as polio. Are there other things I'm missing?
Can't the measles vaccine or something cause some major brain problem in kids? I feel like that's a step1 question thing.
 
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For people who are wary, what are the potential downsides (other than Bill Gates/mind control)? In the history of vaccines, my understanding is that the worst outcomes have involved lots of people getting the disease being immunized against (polio). Getting COVID would be unfortunate, but certainly not as bad as polio. Are there other things I'm missing?
zombie apocalypse
 
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Spikebd

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For people who are wary, what are the potential downsides (other than Bill Gates/mind control)? In the history of vaccines, my understanding is that the worst outcomes have involved lots of people getting the disease being immunized against (polio). Getting COVID would be unfortunate, but certainly not as bad as polio. Are there other things I'm missing?
Several different mRNA vaccines have now been tested from phase I to IIb clinical studies and have been shown to be safe and reasonably well tolerated (Tables 2, 3). However, recent human trials have demonstrated moderate and in rare cases severe injection site or systemic reactions for different mRNA platforms22,91. Potential safety concerns that are likely to be evaluated in future preclinical and clinical studies include local and systemic inflammation, the biodistribution and persistence of expressed immunogen, stimulation of auto-reactive antibodies and potential toxic effects of any non-native nucleotides and delivery system components. A possible concern could be that some mRNA-based vaccine platforms54,166induce potent type I interferon responses, which have been associated not only with inflammation but also potentially with autoimmunity167,168. Thus, identification of individuals at an increased risk of autoimmune reactions before mRNA vaccination may allow reasonable precautions to be taken. Another potential safety issue could derive from the presence of extracellular RNA during mRNA vaccination. Extracellular naked RNA has been shown to increase the permeability of tightly packed endothelial cells and may thus contribute to oedema169. Another study showed that extracellular RNA promoted blood coagulation and pathological thrombus formation170. Safety will therefore need continued evaluation as different mRNA modalities and delivery systems are utilized for the first time in humans and are tested in larger patient populations.

 
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SnapperRocks

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I wonder it they’re checking for anti-interferon antibodies. I wouldn’t be surprised if there are long term issues we dont yet know about for the patients that have been found to have those from getting the actual disease.
 
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Aether2000

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Definitely, and will be getting the mRNA antiviral that affects both B and T cells. Personal risk factors in times of increasing cases and exposure to COVID with emergency intubations tips the scales in favor of receiving the vaccine.
 
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Shimmy8

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From people I know:
1. Don’t trust rushed process
2. Don’t trust govt in general
3. High chance of flu-like sx, etc
4. The long term unknown

I don’t agree with them, it’s prob 50/50ish where I work.
 
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MoMoGesiologist

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HCWs cant even get tested for covid and the tests are being saved for NBA all stars and celebrities, but somehow the life saving vaccine is gonna come to us first... seems fishy to me
 

pocafx

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Actually overheard nurse manager jokingly say don’t get tested just stay home a day or two then come back. 3 icu nurses out with covid atm
 

kidthor

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I'll take it as soon as it's available. I've seen too many wild bad outcomes in people with COVID to suggest the risk out weights the benefit of getting a vaccine ASAP. As for which vaccine - give me whatever I can get first. My med school professor Peter Hotez, who's advice I trust, suggests this: COVID-19 expert: 'Take the first FDA-approved vaccine offered'
 
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Spikebd

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Another question is, “should a provider who wishes not to be in the initial rounds of receiving an mRNA vaccine be exempt until further safety studies are reported?”
For example, should a woman physician who is pregnant or attempting to conceive be required to be vaccinated in order to continue caring for patients?
 
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DoctwoB

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Put it into my veins. Preferably the mRNA, but if the first one I can get is the adenovirus I’ll take that (then the sweet mRNA goodness)

I’m sure there is some unseen 1/100000 late autoimmune risk. I also think it Is quite likely there are rare long term complications of COVID which are a higher risk. And this way I won’t pass it to my grandmother.

The selfish worldview of those in our nation is a legitimate concern.
 
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Matthew9Thirtyfive

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Put it into my veins. Preferably the mRNA, but if the first one I can get is the adenovirus I’ll take that (then the sweet mRNA goodness)

I’m sure there is some unseen 1/100000 late autoimmune risk. I also think it Is quite likely there are rare long term complications of COVID which are a higher risk. And this way I won’t pass it to my grandmother.

The selfish worldview of those in our nation is a legitimate concern.

In my experience, the people who have the more selfish attitude either don’t know anyone who had it or they had a very mild course, so obviously it’s no big deal. I’ve even seen this in physicians, unfortunately.
 
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DrOwnage

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I'm a little disappointed the title of this post wasn't: "Is anyone pulling out?" Of getting the COVID vaccine when it comes out?
 
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linkin06

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From people I know:
1. Don’t trust rushed process
2. Don’t trust govt in general
3. High chance of flu-like sx, etc
4. The long term unknown

I don’t agree with them, it’s prob 50/50ish where I work.
It's not a "rushed" process. It is a noncuttiong corner process that was done all simultaneously but safely at once. There was a lot of financial risk involved if any phases failed. Fortunately, everything has gone well, but nothing was accelerated in terms of leniency.
 
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Matthew9Thirtyfive

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It's not a "rushed" process. It is a noncuttiong corner process that was done all simultaneously but safely at once. There was a lot of financial risk involved if any phases failed. Fortunately, everything has gone well, but nothing was accelerated in terms of leniency.

I think he was saying that’s what people think, not what he thinks.
 
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AdmiralChz

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Give it to me. I’m so over this “new normal” BS and really tired of wearing an N95 or half/full face respirator with each aerosolizing procedure.

The way things are shaping up the mRNA vaccines (Pfizer, Moderna) are going to the only ones available for a while. AstraZeneca’s results don’t meet their own internal benchmarks to ask for FDA approval anytime soon, apparently.

I do worry about distribution, a LOT. It looks like initially it’ll be handled by federal and state authorities (on the ground, mostly state probably). I wouldn’t be surprised if my region is skipped entirely (long story, but my metro area is always overlooked historically) and our governor, despite having an advanced degree, is a total mor0n (apparently the word is censored... really?).

Furthermore there’s a lot of folks out there who greatly distrust the government and won’t take it. Monumental efforts will be needed to convince Joe and Jane Public to get vaccinated. Maybe if you can get obnoxious reality stars and others to jump on board?
 
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MirrorTodd

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Give it to me. I’m so over this “new normal” BS and really tired of wearing an N95 or half/full face respirator with each aerosolizing procedure.

The way things are shaping up the mRNA vaccines (Pfizer, Moderna) are going to the only ones available for a while. AstraZeneca’s results don’t meet their own internal benchmarks to ask for FDA approval anytime soon, apparently.

I do worry about distribution, a LOT. It looks like initially it’ll be handled by federal and state authorities (on the ground, mostly state probably). I wouldn’t be surprised if my region is skipped entirely (long story, but my metro area is always overlooked historically) and our governor, despite having an advanced degree, is a total mor0n (apparently the word is censored... really?).

Furthermore there’s a lot of folks out there who greatly distrust the government and won’t take it. Monumental efforts will be needed to convince Joe and Jane Public to get vaccinated. Maybe if you can get obnoxious reality stars and others to jump on board?
If Trump gets it, every republican disbeliever will.
 

AdmiralChz

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If Trump gets it, every republican disbeliever will.

Maybe, but lots of people out there hate the air Trump breaths. I wonder if that would make an equal number on the far left not take it.

Those on the right aren’t those you need to worry about. You think the crunchy granola plant moms on the west coast will go for the COVID vaccine when the shun MMR et al for their kids now??

Trump, Pence, Biden and Harris all need to roll up their sleeves and get it day 1. Be the example.
 
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AdmiralChz

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Of course, those old enough (not me) to remember the infamous swine flu vaccine will recall how it was rushed and pushed on the populace. There’s a famous picture of Gerald Ford getting the vaccine, and then there was a swarm of folks who developed Guillan-Barre afterwards. Plus that strain of Swine Flu ended up not being so bad.

Expect to hear more about that as we near vaccine distribution, especially to the public. Here’s some info about it: The Public Health Legacy of the 1976 Swine Flu Outbreak

Of note, schools stayed open.
 
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leaverus

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Eventually, but not immediately. Will wait on side effect profile seen in early-adopters. Frankly, not that scared of getting the actual disease - all the colleagues I know who've gotten it have had mild symptoms lasting a couple of weeks and then were back to work. I'll continue to use personal protection to minimize my chances of getting it though; and who knows, I might've already had it and not have known it.
 
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Matthew9Thirtyfive

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Eventually, but not immediately. Will wait on side effect profile seen in early-adopters. Frankly, not that scared of getting the actual disease - all the colleagues I know who've gotten it have had mild symptoms lasting a couple of weeks and then were back to work. I'll continue to use personal protection to minimize my chances of getting it though; and who knows, I might've already had it and not have known it.

And my cousin who was relatively young and healthy is dead now. My classmate who got it in March still can’t do cardio without becoming extremely winded and lightheaded. Just not worth the risk IMO. Gimme that shot.
 
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DoctwoB

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Eventually, but not immediately. Will wait on side effect profile seen in early-adopters. Frankly, not that scared of getting the actual disease - all the colleagues I know who've gotten it have had mild symptoms lasting a couple of weeks and then were back to work. I'll continue to use personal protection to minimize my chances of getting it though; and who knows, I might've already had it and not have known it.

So you might get it. And might give it to your patients. Some of whom might die. And you’re ok with that because seeing 50,000 people get it and do fine in the trials isn’t enough for you. Awesome.
 
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Matthew9Thirtyfive

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Sincerely sorry for the loss of your cousin, but anecdotes mean nothing to me.

Ironic because that’s literally what you are using when you say “all the colleagues I know who've gotten it have had mild symptoms lasting a couple of weeks and then were back to work.”

Sad that someone in medicine doesn’t understand the concept of potentially spreading it to other people who may not be so lucky.
 
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sunshinefl

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Eventually, but not immediately. Will wait on side effect profile seen in early-adopters. Frankly, not that scared of getting the actual disease - all the colleagues I know who've gotten it have had mild symptoms lasting a couple of weeks and then were back to work. I'll continue to use personal protection to minimize my chances of getting it though; and who knows, I might've already had it and not have known it.

Sincerely sorry for the loss of your cousin, but anecdotes mean nothing to me.
Okay so then why are you using anecdotes to decide that the virus isn’t scary?
 
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AMEHigh

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I don’t understand the people still comparing this to the flu or Covid being mild. Yes the vast majority of people don’t die, but when has the flu caused hospitals worldwide to be overrun?

And I don’t want to get the flu either even though I’ll also likely not die either. Being sick and having possible longer term side effects is nothing I want to deal with.

And anecdotally yep have seen the young and healthy patients die as well in greater numbers than "just the flu." Recently lost a family member as well who was older, but she had survived many flu seasons and likely had several more years to live if it weren’t for getting Covid from a younger family member she lived with. Now that younger family member is experiencing a lot of guilt although they did everything correctly, like wearing a mask when grocery shopping.
 
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dhb

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I’m so over this “new normal” BS and really tired of wearing an N95 or half/full face respirator with each aerosolizing procedure.
What's the rational for doing this?
I've been using a normal surgical mask since the beginning and haven't been infected as it should be if you just wear a mask.
 
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epidural man

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Weird, I know of a couple military peeps where I am that underwent the trial.
TRICARE recipients are a large arm of the Oxford vaccine trial. I could have enrolled - decided against it. I don't want to mess with my chance of getting an actual vaccine (since I wouldn't know if I got placebo or not).

I suspect when a vaccine is available, I will be FORCED to get it.
 
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linkin06

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What's the rational for doing this?
I've been using a normal surgical mask since the beginning and haven't been infected as it should be if you just wear a mask.
How’s your community positivity rates? Is your hospital overflowing yet?
 
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Matthew9Thirtyfive

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TRICARE recipients are a large arm of the Oxford vaccine trial. I could have enrolled - decided against it. I don't want to mess with my chance of getting an actual vaccine (since I wouldn't know if I got placebo or not).

I suspect when a vaccine is available, I will be FORCED to get it.

Probably. I'll happily be voluntold. It must have been a local command thing, cause I really wanted to do the trial and wasn't allowed. Bummer.
 

Hoya11

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So you might get it. And might give it to your patients. Some of whom might die. And you’re ok with that because seeing 50,000 people get it and do fine in the trials isn’t enough for you. Awesome.

If someone gets vaccinated, or if someone has been infected in the past and now has antibodies to the virus - cant they still spread the virus to others?

Meaning they contract particles from someone else, their system is invaded but they dont get sick because they have the antibodies, but meanwhile they are breathing all over stuff and living life unaware their body is fighting off the covid particles.. what happens to those particles they are spreading around?

My impression was the vaccine prevents the individual from getting sick, but does not in and of itself prevent spread to someone who is unvaccinated.. im sure the rapid destruction by your antibodies cuts down on the time the person is contagious, but does it stop spread completely?

So your vaccine would not help grandma, grandma would also have to be vaccinated. Right?

I see this as being a no-brainer for the old and vulnerable.

A no- brainer for HCWs and teachers...

Maybe children I could see waiting... very mild disease if any and a long time to develop side effects
 
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DoctwoB

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If someone gets vaccinated, or if someone has been infected in the past and now has antibodies to the virus - cant they still spread the virus?

Meaning they contract particles from someone else, their system is invaded but they dont get sick because they have the antibodies, but meanwhile they are breathing all over stuff and living life unaware their body is fighting off the covid particles.. what happens to those particles they are spreading around?

My impression was the vaccine prevents the individual from getting sick, but does not in and of itself prevent spread to someone who is unvaccinated.. im sure it cuts down on the time the person is contagious, but stop spread completely?

So your vaccine would not help grandma, grandma would also have to be vaccinated. RIght?
That is a fair point, the short answer is maybe. We just don’t have enough information to say one way or the other. The vaccines dramatically reduced symptomatic and severe COVID cases, but (at least in the mRNA trials) they didn’t screen for asymptomstic infection. Is it possible that those cases were still occurring and equally infectious? Sure. But smart money says that there were fewer cases and those that occurred were less infectious with lower viral loads. Just like how you’re not considered a potential spreader of measles if you’ve had the vaccine.
 
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Hoya11

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That is a fair point, the short answer is maybe. We just don’t have enough information to say one way or the other. The vaccines dramatically reduced symptomatic and severe COVID cases, but (at least in the mRNA trials) they didn’t screen for asymptomstic infection. Is it possible that those cases were still occurring and equally infectious? Sure. But smart money says that there were fewer cases and those that occurred were less infectious with lower viral loads. Just like how you’re not considered a potential spreader of measles if you’ve had the vaccine.

So say you dont get the vaccine.

Lots of other people do get it.

The world opens up again.

Covid is spreading around but who cares, no one will get sick right?

How will the unvaccinated person feel in this situation where covid is spreading around because those who took the vaccine are living without restriction?

The unvaccinated person would be at risk of getting sick during this time, since its so ubiquitous for a while....
 
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DoctwoB

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Possibly, but again I can’t think of any other instance where a vaccine prevents symptomatic infection but doesn’t affect transmissibility/R0. Can anyone enlighten me?
 
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Ezekiel2517

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They should decrease transmission since they will affect the R0, lower viral loads, less viral shedding, shorter duration, etc.. And obviously there will be less transmission simply as a result of ppl in the general population getting the vaccine. The trials should also indirectly provide evidence of impact on transmission. The Oxford/AZ trial tested for asymptomatic infection, with volunteers swabbed weekly. From their press release:
1606623586910.png
I thought this was a good article as well.

Understanding COVID-19 vaccine efficacy | Science
1606624447067.png
 
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VA Hopeful Dr

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Possibly, but again I can’t think of any other instance where a vaccine prevents symptomatic infection but doesn’t affect transmissibility/R0. Can anyone enlighten me?
I suspect it's likely to be similar to the flu vaccine. It definitely decreases how infectious you are but doesn't eliminate the chance you could get someone else sick.
 
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