Actual Podiatry Job Postings

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It’s double-talk to keep complaining that there are no good employed jobs and when one is posted just complain how undesirable it is.

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It’s double-talk to keep complaining that there are no good employed jobs and when one is posted just complain how undesirable it is.

This is one “good, likely fair paying job” listed for the upcoming 600 new grads finishing come July 2023 in a city as Nat pointed out reaching 18 below F. Why must a hungry pod needing a job need to go to this type of length for a fair paying job?
 
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It’s double-talk to keep complaining that there are no good employed jobs and when one is posted just complain how undesirable it is.
My opinion: it is logically consistent to say that a good job in a bad area is still undesireable.
 
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Location is a real thing. I heard a story the other day where a graduating IM resident matched at his home program (where his family was established and his kids were in schools etc) but thought it would be funny to tell his wife he had to do his cardiology fellowship in Albuquerque. Apparently his wife started sobbing uncontrollably on the phone and he had to end the joke real quick.
 
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Anyone that say MDs have issues also finding jobs have no clue. Long vacancies for many positions. You are taken out to dinner knowing you will get the job, but want to make sure it will be a good fit.

Know of a MD finishing residency that actually made a pro/cons spreadsheet with like 20 offers. Location of job was not an issue. Do I want to be involved with teaching, research, do I want only 32 hours and full benefits etc, meanwhile their wife (very smart lady) a lawyer had one or two mediocre offers. They took the 32 hours and full benefits. The younger generation wants work/life balance. Working as an associate then possibly opening your own office rarely offers that. If it does, it is usually 15 years later when you have an associate or partner.

We are not MDs true, but to deny their job market is night and day different is wrong. Also a good market for RNs, PAs, CRNAs etc. Podiatry has always been more of a make your opportunity profession, but the market lately for many healthcare professions is insane and we were not invited to the party.
I was with a hospital marketing person yesterday making the rounds talking to docs as the new guy....it was hard explaining to her how podiatry has to create jobs at hospitals whereas hospitals often have to beg and incentivize MDs
 
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My wife's company recently hired a new PA and we got to take him out to dinner as part of the process. We went to the swankiest restaurant in town ($$$$), all paid for by the company. My role was to evaluate his outdoorsiness while going apes*** on the appetizers and wine.

I recall my job interview back in 2001 with a local DPM group and they took me out to Golden Dragon ($) for $7.95 lunch special. Soup and hot tea included. It's funny now...
 
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My wife's company recently hired a new PA and we got to take him out to dinner as part of the process. We went to the swankiest restaurant in town ($$$$), all paid for by the company. My role was to evaluate his outdoorsiness while going apes*** on the appetizers and wine.

I recall my job interview back in 2001 with a local DPM group and they took me out to Golden Dragon ($) for $7.95 lunch special. Soup and hot tea included. It's funny now...
Hahahaha. I was taken to a steak restaurant, but it was a steak restaurant beloved by old people and it went out of business about a month or two after the interview. The person doing the interview actually said - "we love this place and you can always get in here". Anyway, steak was fine, but both my wife and I got served a cold baked potato. Like ice cold.
 
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I'm in a moderately sized city. One of the major hospital systems employ podiatrists (I am not one of them). I am in a friend circle that just happens to be made up of all physicians-all employed by the same hospital except for me. They tell me of their recruitment process...flew themselves and families out, long weekend at the nicest hotel, nice dinners, full on tours of the National Park nearby, etc. I also know the pods at this hospital....they didn't even come close to getting the same treatment. The hospital knows they can easily hire a DPM but MD/DO's get to be more discerning.
 
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It’s double-talk to keep complaining that there are no good employed jobs and when one is posted just complain how undesirable it is.

Nobody said that there are “no” good employed jobs. Everyone has said they are too few and far between for the number of people looking for them. Again, this is a job that appears to pay well and have good benefits, but it is in an area where they would be lucky to get any MD/DO/NP/PA/CRNA applying or signing on the dotted line for years. Comparatively speaking, our job market is bad. I think jobs like this highlight that. It’s not double speak, it’s actually pretty intellectually consistent.
 
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It’s double-talk to keep complaining that there are no good employed jobs and when one is posted just complain how undesirable it is.
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I would argue that a good judgement of the job market would be what jobs are available in desirable locations. Is there a well paying position in NYC? SF Bay Area? Chicago? Boston?

Having great positions mostly in rural locations is alarming. The brightest, most talented individuals in any field tends to migrate towards major populace. There's a reason why a top notch cardiac surgeon doesn't work in 10 bed hospital. He/she needs appropriate support and hospital arrangements for their talents.

Need to stop hiding behind the real issues behind our job market which is WE ARE NOT AN ESSENTIAL SERVICE. We are at the mercy how the administration values us in particular markets.
 
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I would argue that a good judgement of the job market would be what jobs are available in desirable locations. Is there a well paying position in NYC? SF Bay Area? Chicago? Boston?

Having great positions mostly in rural locations is alarming. The brightest, most talented individuals in any field tends to migrate towards major populace. There's a reason why a top notch cardiac surgeon doesn't work in 10 bed hospital. He/she needs appropriate support and hospital arrangements for their talents.

Need to stop hiding behind the real issues behind our job market which is WE ARE NOT AN ESSENTIAL SERVICE. We are at the mercy how the administration values us in particular markets.


This. Which is why most everyone on this board has been screaming about market saturation. This field is saturated, and it will only get worse. Guess we have fellowships to separate the true die-hards versus the rest of us.

There are no good paying jobs in major metropolitan areas, unless you are talking about private practice with a predatory set-up. I am 7 years out, have worked for a hospital system and transitioned to private practice due to personal reasons, well-trained, and I can tell you - everything in this profession is an uphill battle. It's not an issue of glass half full - things are objectively that bad. Those of you rocking great jobs - stay put. I envy you. Private practice is simply rough, rough, rough.

Dr Rogers, thanks for continuing to come onto this forum. My questions for you as part of ABPM leadership:

1. Do you, at the minimum, acknowledge that there is indeed a real problem in pay and good jobs in podiatry?

2. If not -- why not?

3. If this profession were truly in demand, do you think that should be reflected in hiring forums across all sites for major hospital systems in the US? Not just handful of posts. We graduate a few hundred grads, and yet - ortho foot and ankle job postings are more numerous than podiatrists.

3. What are the specific offers your previous years residents received out of residency? Where did they end up in practice and what was their actual offer?
 
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Where did they end up in practice and what was their actual offer?

Here are the recent UTSA grads:
2022
1. DPM Group
2. Opened Solo
3. Bought Solo
2021
1. DPM Group
2. DPM Group
3. Foot care / MSG
2020
1. MSG
2. Solo
3. Hospital Backed Group
2019
1. Solo
2. VA
3. DPM Group

Honestly, it's so overlooked when picking a residency where people end up. I picked my residency based on that many of the grads ended up in ortho practices so they must have been doing something right with their training.
 
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Here are the recent UTSA grads:
2022
1. DPM Group
2. Opened Solo
3. Bought Solo
2021
1. DPM Group
2. DPM Group
3. Foot care / MSG
2020
1. MSG
2. Solo
3. Hospital Backed Group
2019
1. Solo
2. VA
3. DPM Group

Honestly, it's so overlooked when picking a residency where people end up. I picked my residency based on that many of the grads ended up in ortho practices so they must have been doing something right with their training.
This looks pretty typical for a typical residency. Typical residencies were what was a good residency not that long ago.

It really depends what one's expectations are. Not that long ago no one expected there to even be more than handful of hospital and ortho jobs. If one expects a good organizational job....which is a reasonable expectation based on employment trends and opportunities available in many other healthcare professions then most will be let down with podiatry.

You can see many still go solo in podiatry which is somewhat risky and comes with all the headaches of being a small business owner.

The associate job market has been discussed at length. Not all opportunities are bad, but too many are.

The podiatry job market leaves much to be desired. If and when one finds a good job, they rarely leave unlike many other healthcare professions. People leave all the time for lots of reasons in other healthcare professions....the jobs might even be very similar but a 15 minute commute versus their current commute of 40 minutes alone might be a reason to switch jobs.

Obviously in podiatry there are lots of partners and small business owners. In these situations it can be very difficult and sometimes impossible to leave for another job. The job security and potential for various income streams can sometimes outweigh the cons of being an owner, but certainly not always.
 
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Great opportunity for the new grad that specializes in frostbite/chilblain/raynaud recon and make a positive cash flow with the PVD clinic testing machine thing.
 

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The weirdest thing to me about a lot of Midwest people is they don't know how to dress in cold weather ie. outdoor job, negative temperature outside - entirely dressed in cotton. Cotton socks. No real layering. Jeans. No synthetics, no wool, no shell. Nothing for head/face. And yeah, toes going numb. I don't claim to own all the gear but damn people.
 
Here are the recent UTSA grads:
2022
1. DPM Group
2. Opened Solo
3. Bought Solo
2021
1. DPM Group
2. DPM Group
3. Foot care / MSG
2020
1. MSG
2. Solo
3. Hospital Backed Group
2019
1. Solo
2. VA
3. DPM Group

Honestly, it's so overlooked when picking a residency where people end up. I picked my residency based on that many of the grads ended up in ortho practices so they must have been doing something right with their training.
So over the last 4 years: 2 out of 3 are in private practice with half of those still in solo practice.

Very few now go into solo private practice because they really, really want to. Not to say it can never work out.

I wonder if the schools and podiatry organizations are letting prospective students know....when you finish your residency opening your own practice is still basically the most common way to practice......in other words don't necessarily count on a job. You better be willing to create your own job.

Better worry less about boards and more about running a business.
 
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It’s double-talk to keep complaining that there are no good employed jobs and when one is posted just complain how undesirable it is.
Not really double-talk at all. Most people don't go into $350k debt and stress over school for 4 years, then go to residency and get screamed at from both ends daily for three years while barely making rent and bills with the end goal of having to practice in Amarillo, Laredo, random-nowhere-town in order to make decent pay. The fact is, "going to medical school" brings certain end-goal expectations, and the open podiatry jobs of today ain't it.
 
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The weirdest thing to me about a lot of Midwest people is they don't know how to dress in cold weather ie. outdoor job, negative temperature outside - entirely dressed in cotton. Cotton socks. No real layering. Jeans. No synthetics, no wool, no shell. Nothing for head/face. And yeah, toes going numb. I don't claim to own all the gear but damn people.
Obviously you didn't learn enough about midwesterner's during your time at DMU.


This handle routinely (ie every post) captures midwest culture.
 
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About "geographic openness"

Yes there are benefits to working someplace out-of-the-way. But no one really talks specifically about why it's undesireable.

You move away from your family, friends, colleagues, everyone you ever knew just to make a living. Yeah you can stay connected on social media but over time you lose a lot of what you originally had in common. Yeah you can meet new people but a lot of these relationships are business related, they're predicated on $ changing hands so when the $ stops, so does your reason to associate with this person.

You want to visit anyone from your previous life? Well, you're probably far and away from any major travel hub so you may or may not have direct flights to where you need to go. And those flights will cost you

You want to go out on the weekends? Where are you going to go? There aren't many good restaurants around. And those that are supposed to be good are actually mediocre. There's fun things to do but nothing exciting, not much cultural enrichment.

If you're rural/exurb, you might get a nice house, you might not. Other things you take for granted: does it have public sewer access or do you have a septic system? Are you connected to the gas grid or do you need to have heating oil delivered?

Family life: if you're married, are the schools in your community decent? What kind of people are your children going to be spending time with? Would you rather pay extra for private school? If you're single, are you going to meet someone in this area? Or just work like a hermit?

Not saying these questions don't have answers. Just that these are tradeoffs we need to think about when deciding where we're going to settle down. The choice is harder for DPMs than for anyone else.
 
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I wonder if the schools and podiatry organizations are letting prospective students know....when you finish your residency opening your own practice is still basically the most common way to practice......in other words don't necessarily count on a job. You better be willing to create your own job.

Better worry less about boards and more about running a business.
No they don't. The just get a bunch of bots with scripts telling us we're gonna be student surgeons and that there are gonna be patients with BMI of 9000 who needs you to save that limb that's hanging on by a piece of dog hair with the 4 weeks old unna boots that smells like NYC train station on a hot summer day.
 
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Good wound care job

 
It’s double-talk to keep complaining that there are no good employed jobs and when one is posted just complain how undesirable it is.

Speaking of double-talk, backhanded and inflammatory posts with an intent to deceive - why is it that you conveniently ignore a majority of the forum member’s questions to you while making posts like this?
 
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Hi all, slightly off-topic, but longtime, lurking neutral party here (ophthalmologist). I greatly respect the dialogue you have as a group, and it helps me with the business of medicine since I feel our fields are pretty similar. Is there any interest in me doing a thread with a deep dive into the differences between our job markets? I feel like you folks should be much closer to what we see given your level of training. Feel free to tell me to kick rocks if no, I'm not here to cause trouble.
 
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Hi all, slightly off-topic, but longtime, lurking neutral party here (ophthalmologist). I greatly respect the dialogue you have as a group, and it helps me with the business of medicine since I feel our fields are pretty similar. Is there any interest in me doing a thread with a deep dive into the differences between our job markets? I feel like you folks should be much closer to what we see given your level of training. Feel free to tell me to kick rocks if no, I'm not here to cause trouble.
Well. That's countercultural view. but you definitely have my interest.
 
Well. That's countercultural view. but you definitely have my interest.
Similarities:
4 years of professional school
3 years of residency for you, 4 for us
Fellowship optional (although I did 2 years, come at me bros)
Limited regional anatomy (although different ends of the body)
Procedural in clinic and surgical to whatever degree you like/are able
Scope battles (you and ortho, us and optometry, though opposite)
Variable training (though not as much as it seems you folks deal with)
Other medical specialties not totally respecting your training (we're often considered eye dentists)
Can sell things to patients for extra income (glasses have to be more egregious than DME)
 
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Hi all, slightly off-topic, but longtime, lurking neutral party here (ophthalmologist). I greatly respect the dialogue you have as a group, and it helps me with the business of medicine since I feel our fields are pretty similar. Is there any interest in me doing a thread with a deep dive into the differences between our job markets? I feel like you folks should be much closer to what we see given your level of training. Feel free to tell me to kick rocks if no, I'm not here to cause trouble.
Never head that opthamalogists were not respected by other specialists. I figured many were jealous of their lifestyle as it is one the ROADs specialties. The opthamoligists I knew always had just as large of a house in the same neighborhoods as the other high earning specialists.

Yes some opthamologists do only basics surgeries and some sub specialize. Many opthamologists seem to be a bit more appreciative of their referral sources than many other specialties. While many are in groups, there are also still a good number of solo practitioners also.

Not denying that there are some similarities to podiatry, but rarely do I hear of them being similar enough to be compared.
 
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Never head that opthamalogists were not respected by other specialists. I figured many were jealous of their lifestyle as it is one the ROADs specialties. The opthamoligists I knew always had just as large of a house in the same neighborhoods as the other high earning specialists.

Yes some opthamologists do only basics surgeries and some sub specialize. Many opthamologists seem to be a bit more appreciative of their referral sources than many other specialties. While many are in groups, there are also still a good number of solo practitioners also.

Not denying that there are some similarities to podiatry, but rarely do I hear of them being similar enough to be compared.
Eh, it's just that we're so far out from general medicine that it's a weird niche. PCPs get kinda fed up when we ask for clearance for our uncontrolled 75 y/o DM2/CHF/COPD/BKA patients instead of doing it ourselves. Ortho folks in our hospital think we're not surgeons. I agree that we don't get the shaft badly. Also agree about the variety of practice patterns, which I'll touch on in the appropriate thread since it seems like there's enough interest for me to write something up.

I'll shut up and stop derailing this thread at least.
 
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Other medical specialties not totally respecting your training (we're often considered eye dentists)
Right now there's a dentist reading this thread thinking, "Heyyyyy..."

JK, I think the "grass is always greener" adage runs throughout medicine (except maybe for neurosurgeons). I recall speaking with an anesthesiologist who said that they think of themselves as the red-headed stepchildren of medicine. His words, not mine.
 
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Eh, it's just that we're so far out from general medicine that it's a weird niche. PCPs get kinda fed up when we ask for clearance for our uncontrolled 75 y/o DM2/CHF/COPD/BKA patients instead of doing it ourselves. Ortho folks in our hospital think we're not surgeons. I agree that we don't get the shaft badly. Also agree about the variety of practice patterns, which I'll touch on in the appropriate thread since it seems like there's enough interest for me to write something up.

I'll shut up and stop derailing this thread at least.
You aren’t derailing. The funniest discussions about your profession are in the anesthesia for them. Ie. How much clearance is really needed for a case done under a local or should a surgery center pay for an anesthesiologist to cover eyeballs that all have Medicare which apparently reimburses them poorly.
 
You aren’t derailing. The funniest discussions about your profession are in the anesthesia for them. Ie. How much clearance is really needed for a case done under a local or should a surgery center pay for an anesthesiologist to cover eyeballs that all have Medicare which apparently reimburses them poorly.
It’s pretty ridiculous honestly, but when anesthesiologists want it so I can do the case, hands are tied sometimes. I do retina, so my block for a case has a 1 in a million chance of killing someone. Should never need more than a CRNA unless it’s a super sick general case, <2% of my cases. Kinda cool to operate with folks awake, interesting conversations sometimes

Also, apologies to lurking dentists, I grew up where you didn’t need shoes, electricity, plumbing, or especially teeth
 
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It’s pretty ridiculous honestly, but when anesthesiologists want it so I can do the case, hands are tied sometimes. I do retina, so my block for a case has a 1 in a million chance of killing someone. Should never need more than a CRNA unless it’s a super sick general case, <2% of my cases. Kinda cool to operate with folks awake, interesting conversations sometimes

Also, apologies to lurking dentists, I grew up where you didn’t need shoes, electricity, plumbing, or especially teeth
I once did an ingrown toenail procedure on a kid with autism in the O.R. under monitored anesthesia care. Normally that's a procedure that we'd do in the office under straight local but he wouldn't let me inject his toe so the insurance company approved doing it in the surgery center. I was finished before Anesthesia even got him completely under. All I needed was for them to sedate him enough for me to inject but they had their process and didn't want to stop short or something. By the time they were ready I was like, "Yeah I'm all done."

CRNA v. MD/DO Anesthesiologists is another turf battle.
 
I once did an ingrown toenail procedure on a kid with autism in the O.R. under monitored anesthesia care. Normally that's a procedure that we'd do in the office under straight local but he wouldn't let me inject his toe so the insurance company approved doing it in the surgery center. I was finished before Anesthesia even got him completely under. All I needed was for them to sedate him enough for me to inject but they had their process and didn't want to stop short or something. By the time they were ready I was like, "Yeah I'm all done."
Venturing firmly off topic, I either do matrixectomies in the office or I don't do them. I understand the value of my time and it's just not a good use of my OR time. If the patient's parents insist, I will refer them to whichever doctors in the area are stupid enough to advertise that they are members of our unfortunately named pediatric organization (ACFAP).

PROTIP: to inject anesthesia in an uncooperative patient, recline the chair flat with the caregiver lying across the patient's torso. Then stand beside the patient's hip with your back to their face and kneel accross their thigh while holding the foot in your off-hand by the forefoot in extreme plantarflexion. We know the ankle is extremely unstable in this position, and any wrenching motions on the part of the patient will result in great discomfort for them. This will afford you the 10 sec you need to place your anesthetic block. The ends justify the means.
 
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Venturing firmly off topic, I either do matrixectomies in the office or I don't do them. I understand the value of my time and it's just not a good use of my OR time. If the patient's parents insist, I will refer them to whichever doctors in the area are stupid enough to advertise that they are members of our unfortunately named pediatric organization (ACFAP).

PROTIP: to inject anesthesia in an uncooperative patient, recline the chair flat with the caregiver lying across the patient's torso. Then stand beside the patient's hip with your back to their face and kneel accross their thigh while holding the foot in your off-hand by the forefoot in extreme plantarflexion. We know the ankle is extremely unstable in this position, and any wrenching motions on the part of the patient will result in great discomfort for them. This will afford you the 10 sec you need to place your anesthetic block. The ends justify the means.
ive done 2-3 in the OR. All kicking screaming spitting biting children. I book them when im already there and it didnt take that much time. One anesthesiologist insists on general anesthesia/LMA. It was so dumb.
 
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You guys are insaaaaaane... I won't deal with that crying kicking kid (or big kid... or adult) stuff at all.

Besides the threat to hurt myself, staff, patient, etc with a kick or needle poke or instrument... I don't want to scar the kid for life and make them hate doctors. That's not to mention it's just plain uncomfortable for everyone involved and not exactly good for biz in busy PP office and waiting room to have crying and thumping coming from an exam room and then a red-faced kid at checkout. :)

I will do avulsions for paronychia on babies and little toddlers (mom can easily hold them down and screen them), but the age ~4-8yrs and the special needs pts seem to be the potential problem ones. When they get anxious and dramatic or pouty and hide their foot by sitting on it or whatever, I just take off my gloves tell the parent or caregiver that I have other patients and they can bring them back when they're more calm... or we can schedule for OR.

Nobody ever died from a paronychia or pain from a pincer nail... 100% not worth it if it's going to be any kind of struggle. Rx them abx and let them go to competition offices or hospital or whatever to deal with it. If they want to do OR, ok.... just put it on with a block of other cases, and it takes half the time there it does in your office with the bawling and wiggling theatrics. 🎅
 
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Venturing firmly off topic, I either do matrixectomies in the office or I don't do them. I understand the value of my time and it's just not a good use of my OR time. If the patient's parents insist, I will refer them to whichever doctors in the area are stupid enough to advertise that they are members of our unfortunately named pediatric organization (ACFAP).

PROTIP: to inject anesthesia in an uncooperative patient, recline the chair flat with the caregiver lying across the patient's torso. Then stand beside the patient's hip with your back to their face and kneel accross their thigh while holding the foot in your off-hand by the forefoot in extreme plantarflexion. We know the ankle is extremely unstable in this position, and any wrenching motions on the part of the patient will result in great discomfort for them. This will afford you the 10 sec you need to place your anesthetic block. The ends justify the means.

I dunno, that just seems like a recipe for a traumatized child and/or workplace injury/needle stick. And this is coming from someone who HATES having to waste an OR spot for a ingrown toenail in a child/special needs patient.
 
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You guys understand how anesthesia works right? A nurse needs to establish IV access first. Patient's getting a needle one way or another.
 
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I don’t make a habit of doing matricectomies in the operating room but I’ll gladly make an exception for a kid with autism.
 
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You guys are insaaaaaane... I won't deal with that crying kicking kid (or big kid... or adult) stuff at all.

Besides the threat to hurt myself, staff, patient, etc with a kick or needle poke or instrument... I don't want to scar the kid for life and make them hate doctors. That's not to mention it's just plain uncomfortable for everyone involved and not exactly good for biz in busy PP office and waiting room to have crying and thumping coming from an exam room and then a red-faced kid at checkout. :)

I will do avulsions for paronychia on babies and little toddlers (mom can easily hold them down and screen them), but the age ~4-8yrs and the special needs pts seem to be the potential problem ones. When they get anxious and dramatic or pouty and hide their foot by sitting on it or whatever, I just take off my gloves tell the parent or caregiver that I have other patients and they can bring them back when they're more calm... or we can schedule for OR.

Nobody ever died from a paronychia or pain from a pincer nail... 100% not worth it if it's going to be any kind of struggle. Rx them abx and let them go to competition offices or hospital or whatever to deal with it. If they want to do OR, ok.... just put it on with a block of other cases, and it takes half the time there it does in your office with the bawling and wiggling theatrics. 🎅

Thanks for the insight. I stupidly wasted 15 mins sitting in a room listening to a mom console her daughter it’s okay to get the toe injected. Never again. Same goes for non qualified patients that want their callous removed. I feel heartless if I just walk out but it’s getting to the point where it’s not worth my time explaining the rules to them
 
I don’t make a habit of doing matricectomies in the operating room but I’ll gladly make an exception for a kid with autism.
Are you a patient advocate or advocan't???

Yeah, I don't see it as a trouble at all to do ingrown in the OR if they'd be a disaster in the office. There are good reasons to do them.

I also do most revisional (wedge + stitches) ones in OR since I just want the better instruments, lights, etc. Those are usually multi-failed phenols by others or by me, pyogenic granulomas from phenol attempt, etc. I even do occasional verruca excis or stubborn poros and stuff in OR for various reasons. It's just smoother and doesn't mess up the office floor or your schedule.
 
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You guys are insaaaaaane... I won't deal with that crying kicking kid (or big kid... or adult) stuff at all.

Besides the threat to hurt myself, staff, patient, etc with a kick or needle poke or instrument... I don't want to scar the kid for life and make them hate doctors. That's not to mention it's just plain uncomfortable for everyone involved and not exactly good for biz in busy PP office and waiting room to have crying and thumping coming from an exam room and then a red-faced kid at checkout. :)

I will do avulsions for paronychia on babies and little toddlers (mom can easily hold them down and screen them), but the age ~4-8yrs and the special needs pts seem to be the potential problem ones. When they get anxious and dramatic or pouty and hide their foot by sitting on it or whatever, I just take off my gloves tell the parent or caregiver that I have other patients and they can bring them back when they're more calm... or we can schedule for OR.

Nobody ever died from a paronychia or pain from a pincer nail... 100% not worth it if it's going to be any kind of struggle. Rx them abx and let them go to competition offices or hospital or whatever to deal with it. If they want to do OR, ok.... just put it on with a block of other cases, and it takes half the time there it does in your office with the bawling and wiggling theatrics. 🎅
At my new job I only see 15 and older. Podopeds is not for me. I dont have the patience as you above laid out.
 
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You guys understand how anesthesia works right? A nurse needs to establish IV access first. Patient's getting a needle one way or another.
Oh yes. Nurse called me on all those OR matrixectomies. Cant establish IV.

Usually the anesthesiologist brings them back to the room screaming without an IV then turns the gas on and holds them down until they lose consciousness. "FInally silence" is usually the first thing said.
 
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You guys understand how anesthesia works right? A nurse needs to establish IV access first. Patient's getting a needle one way or another.
You would think. I have actually seen some princesses get gassed while they are getting their IV access in the OR before.
 
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Are you a patient advocate or advocan't???

Yeah, I don't see it as a trouble at all to do ingrown in the OR if they'd be a disaster in the office. There are good reasons to do them.

I also do most revisional (wedge + stitches) ones in OR since I just want the better instruments, lights, etc. Those are usually multi-failed phenols by others or by me, pyogenic granulomas from phenol attempt, etc. I even do occasional verruca excis or stubborn poros and stuff in OR for various reasons. It's just smoother and doesn't mess up the office floor or your schedule.
I like the winograd! the surgery center I was at wouldnt allow phenol in the OR so any matrixectomy done in OR was a winograd. They work great!
 
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Are you a patient advocate or advocan't???

Yeah, I don't see it as a trouble at all to do ingrown in the OR if they'd be a disaster in the office. There are good reasons to do them.

I also do most revisional (wedge + stitches) ones in OR since I just want the better instruments, lights, etc. Those are usually multi-failed phenols by others or by me, pyogenic granulomas from phenol attempt, etc. I even do occasional verruca excis or stubborn poros and stuff in OR for various reasons. It's just smoother and doesn't mess up the office floor or your schedule.
I’m an advoCAN! I’m an advoCAN! 🤠

It’s pretty unusual for me to not be able to get it done in the office though. If necessary I put a hex on them with my melodic, sonorous voice.
 
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Similarities:
4 years of professional school
3 years of residency for you, 4 for us
Fellowship optional (although I did 2 years, come at me bros)
Limited regional anatomy (although different ends of the body)
Procedural in clinic and surgical to whatever degree you like/are able
Scope battles (you and ortho, us and optometry, though opposite)
Variable training (though not as much as it seems you folks deal with)
Other medical specialties not totally respecting your training (we're often considered eye dentists)
Can sell things to patients for extra income (glasses have to be more egregious than DME)
You have Dr. Glaucomflecken we have....@heybrother?
 
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I’m an advoCAN! I’m an advoCAN! 🤠

It’s pretty unusual for me to not be able to get it done in the office though. If necessary I put a hex on them with my melodic, sonorous voice.
You have Dr. Glaucomflecken we have....@heybrother?
If you folks aren’t watching Glaucomflecken’s content, you’re missing every hilarious stereotype of medical specialties

And that’s not counting the corporate medical stuff
 
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I find eye eye_captain’s perspective very refreshing. I work at a surgery center which is heavy on eye surgery. The majority of the ophthalmologists rarely give me the time of day. In clinical practice, there is very little interaction between our specialties, so the surgeons at this center likely know little about what I do.

I’ve always considered ophthalmologists to be at the top of the food chain, since it’s a very difficult residency to obtain.

A good friend of mine is an ophthalmologist and 100% honest and ethical. His practice grew so quickly he had to hire 3 new ophthalmologists at once.

I appreciate the comparison with podiatry, but realistically there is a world of difference how the two specialties are perceived.

Although optometrists do have some cross over, podiatry has to share the patient population with ortho, derm, physiatry, PT, chiro, etc.

But it is interesting to learn that a well respected specialist feels some connection with us.
 
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Usajobs just had a listing for a wound care podiatrist in Spokane starting at 200k. Not too bad.
 
Usajobs just had a listing for a wound care podiatrist in Spokane starting at 200k. Not too bad.
Spokane is basically Montana. Once again, a decent paying job where no one wants to live. This is not why most people go to pod school.
 
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Good wound care job

To be fair life in the suburbs would not be horrible in Spokane if one likes the pros more than the cons of the PNW. One can always try to transfer later. There may not be 100 applicants, but there will be plenty.

At one time podiatry schools were mainly in the largest of cities and many that went in to podiatry school also wanted to remain in the largest of cities for religious, ethnic, family and not to mention cultural reasons. I think most now know the large cities and their very desirable suburbs are saturated. Certainly there are some jobs that are available in these areas, but the good ones are extremely competitive. The bad jobs in these locations tend to find someone willing to take the job.....at least for a few years.

The associate job market does not always pay a fair base and have a fair track or sometimes any track to partnership. Certainly some are killing it with their bonuses and then end up being a partner a couple years later, but not enough. Less supply would make the associate job market much better.

There are not enough organizational jobs for everyone and I doubt there ever will be. There are way more than there used to be, but that is a tease.....just enough for one to really think they will get an organizational job when they enter podiatry school, but realize later they will likely end up in PP and maybe even solo practice.
 
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